Picture of my "new" electric/hydraulic shop press

75 tons of crushing force. Piston is 8 inch diameter.
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-bLQFVWr1c2Q/UZQSa9M6uBI/AAAAAAAACf0/DBfD2idIGLk/w490-h653-no/20130515_173855.jpg
Powered by a 110v electric hydraulic pump.
Has a gate for safety compliance.
I bought the body of this press at an auction for $50, finally located the hydraulic unit, and we hooked up everything together.
i
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So, are you using it to crush pop cans? <VBG>
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I had a piece of aluminum (pump cover) with pipe fittings stuck in it. I crushed it to separate the metals to get the full scrap value. 3/4 inch aluminum cracked like a walnut.
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On Thu, 16 May 2013 14:40:29 -0500, Ignoramus13578

Cheaper die castings will do that. In fact, a lot of aluminum castings will do that, diecast or not.
Since you're in the scrap business, you may also want to know about "hot shortness" in aluminum and cast iron. When you get them to the right temperature -- you can look up the temps yourself -- you can break up even heavy pieces of c.i. with a hammer. Likewise, aluminum, particularly those alloys containing copper. Really cheap, garbage steel does the same thing if it has a lot of sulfur in in. The commodity contruction grades (imported, uncertified A36 -- as if certification means anything for A36, anyway) often do.
Taking advantage of it, even over a fire from a charcoal grill, can make it a lot easier to bust up many types of castings.
--
Ed Huntress

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Yes, I am sure that it was a casting.

Yep, I will keep that in mind.
i
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wrote:

There's a 120 ton press where my son works, it's used for destructive testing and it has ~inch thick polycarbonate shielding on three sides.
-alls fun and games till somebody gets his teeth knocked out.
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On Thu, 16 May 2013 12:01:03 -0500, Karl Townsend
VW u-joint caps. <bseg>
--
The Road to Success...is always under construction.
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On Wed, 15 May 2013 18:01:34 -0500

Many years ago, in a different life... I was working on a farm. They had a John Deere 60 tractor in which the clutch began slipping. Normally with those old hand clutch tractors you just pop a big end cover off the belt pulley and remove some cotter pins on castellated nuts tighten each maybe quarter turn and then re-assemble. That didn't work though. Some investigation found that on some tractors like this a large gear would work loose on the belt pulley/assembly. It was a press fit. We didn't have anything, nor could cobble up a way to press the thing back into place. It only needed to go maybe 1/4 inch. Anyway... the point to this story is we took it to a local alternator/starter rebuilding shop. They had a 50 ton hydraulic press which put it back in place. Charged us ~$20 if I recall. So if you let the word get around that you have a press like that you might pick up a few odd jobs here and there.
Nice press by the way :)
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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It is great, and I am sure that I can find ways to monetize it.
i
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On Wed, 15 May 2013 18:01:34 -0500, Ignoramus6805

Cool!!!!
Mo Power!!!
--
"You guess the truth hurts?

Really?
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