Very interesting compressor

I saw this compressor today and witnessed it run. It must have been
made in 1940's, has a huge 75 HP motor and is quieter than a mouse.
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i
Reply to
Ignoramus28528
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Looks like it was made after 1955, per Wikipedia.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus28528
It's not that old. Where I used to work we had three of them. They were new in 1986. Joy was the brandname. Probably ran somewhere around 90-100 rpm
Reply to
Gerry
Well, th emotor looks very old.
Reply to
Ignoramus28528
Yes it does. Looks like some of the 40's vintage stuff I have at work now. The ones I have are off of military ships and are on their original v config air compressors
Reply to
Gerry
The Expert has spoken. It must be from the 1940s and everbody else needs to shut up.
Reply to
Cydrome Leader
I will call the maintenance man at that place tomorrow and will ask him about the date of the compressor. He had been at the plant for 30 years. I will let you know.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus28528
You thinking of bidding on it? It's a water cooled compressor. The whole compressor head and cylinder has a jacket around it and it's a double acting cylinder, at least ours were. They were quite and reliable
Reply to
Gerry
Joy Manufacturing of Cambridge Ontario built hundreds of them up untill the eighties??? I think it was late eighties the plant closed down here.
Reply to
clare
It must have a short stroke judging by how low the crank is in the crankcase.
Reply to
aasberry
The old Ingersoll Rand compressors with the 300 RPM synchronous motors direct-driving the crank were also pretty quiet. I think they were about 100 Hp. The motors looked like something from 1900, salient pole motors with wound field coils on the rotor. They used a phase angle meter to adjust the field current to act as a "synchronous condenser" to correct the plant's power factor.
(only older EE's know this, but a synchronous electric machine, if the field is overexcited, run with leading power factor, acting as large capacitors, to correct for the usual lagging phase angle of most other equipment.)
I saw a couple of them at the Emerson Electric defense plant, they were put in in 1951.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
Hey Iggy,
A compressor that size is only "quiet" when in the best location. Note the size of the intake piping, and that it goes out of sight to some distant place. There won't be anyplace that you can have the air-intake opening located in a residential neighbourhood and still stay free of being shot by some irate citizen if you buy it. The noise these make is not quite like the Sears stuff, but imagine the effect of multiplying that 5HP noise maker you have now by 15 plus times.
The intake noise is similar to a "concussion" noise when running. Somebody here mentioned Joy in Cambridge. Just up the road in Hespeler at one of the textile mills they had a 100HP one that was fairly quiet in the building. You could hear the piston slap it was so quiet. But you couldn't talk or hear if you were within 100 feet of the intake outside. Awesome sound !!
Take care.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario.
Reply to
Brian Lawson
The suction of ours went up just past the top of the compressor and had a large filter can. When it was running, we could carry on a normal conversation while standing next ti it. The company later addas an Atlas Copco rotary compressor next to it. That thing screamed! Could not stand to be around it with the cabinent door open
Reply to
Gerry
So, those compressors were running constantly, then?
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Reply to
Ignoramus10776
The air pipes for this compressor are 5 inch in diameter.
Does the same apply if there is an intake silencer?
i
Reply to
Ignoramus10776
Well, I did call him, he said that it is "very old and they got it a lot earlier than his start date 30 years ago". Then he gave me some details about its recent rebuild.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus10776
That's how they usually installed monsters like that - it has an unloader and runs constantly, the unloader cuts it in as the mainline pressure demand calls for.
They only had to spin it up once in the morning, before the other big loads in the factory.
I thinl you have a smaller example of this in your collection. In a residence you don't get billed for Demand Current, so a start surge isn't a problem- as long as it doesn't trip the Main Breaker or cause computers to reboot and lose unsaved data...
But on commercial service, starting and stopping a 150-HP motor several times a day (with all the other loads running) will spike the demand meter, and the demand factor adjustments could literally double the monthly power bill.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
But they probably didn't even try to muffle it, they just moved the intake outside and stopped. They might have to build a big tuned trap chamber, but the noise can be damped.
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Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
Hey; I resemble that remark...
Reply to
David Lesher
My garage has a separate meter, and the power co. does not allow 2 residential feeds at the same property, and so the garage is billed by the 'demand' rules.
I'm not running anything big- yet.
Dave
Reply to
spamTHISbrp

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