Way to mix concrete without a cement mixer

I have some projects at home for which I am wanting to make my own concrete with Portland cement, gravel, sand, and of course water. I need a fair amo
unt of concrete but not all at one time. I don't have a cement mixer and it would be a pain to rent one every time because I cant do all these project s in one day or even a weekend. I am wanting to pur a footer along my drive way to make a brick boarder, and I also have some concrete edging I want to make.
Is there anything without too much trouble I could fab together that would be relatively in expensive?
I wondered if a 55 gallon drum and a tractor post hole digger for a mixer w ould work?
Any help is appreciated!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 09/10/2014 9:12 AM, stryped wrote:

I'd suggest if can't find a loaner from a friend/neighbor/acquaintance to just buy one of the cheapies from HF or the like and plan on reselling it when you're done (if you don't find it useful enough to just keep)
--


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 10 Sep 2014 09:14:48 -0500, dpb wrote:

Or look on Craigslist for someone who's just done that.
I don't know if it's just a Hawaii thing, but in one "This Old House" episode they bought concrete where you picked it up at the plant in a mixer-trailer, then brought the trailer back when you were done.
If it's a BIG job, it may be cheapest to just have a concrete truck come out.
--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Second this! Borrow, buy used or buy cheap. I bought a used one nearly 30 years ago that still runs fine as of last year. Wheelbarrow and a hoe are too much work!
Unless you have a young and strong helper, pay the few extra cents for 60 LB bags. Much easer to lift and pore in the mixer than 80 LB. Home Depots near me keep 60 LB inside and the 80 out front. Explained that too many people would buy the 60 then load the 'wrong' one intentionally.
--
William

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have some projects at home for which I am wanting to make my own concrete with Portland cement, gravel, sand, and of course water. I need a fair amount of concrete but not all at one time. I don't have a cement mixer and it would be a pain to rent one every time because I cant do all these projects in one day or even a weekend. I am wanting to pur a footer along my driveway to make a brick boarder, and I also have some concrete edging I want to make.
Is there anything without too much trouble I could fab together that would be relatively in expensive?
I wondered if a 55 gallon drum and a tractor post hole digger for a mixer would work?
Any help is appreciated!
===============My father made quite a bit of concrete in a large wheelbarrow with a shovel. IIRC he mixed the dry ingrediants fairly well before adding water.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 10 Sep 2014 12:15:16 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

I built a concrete patio that way when I was 14. It was 10 feet by 16 feet, and (nominally) 4 inches thick. It took me four days, if I recall correctly.
I do not recommend it for anything that large. To stabilize a basketball net or to make a base for rocks around a garden, it's OK -- I still do it that way. I've used the same method for my ferrocement experiments.
But for anything large, it's backbreaking.
BTW, a big mortar box is better, because the wheelbarrow is too high.
--
Ed Huntress
>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


I've heard that in some parts of New Jersey you can see cement mixers used as contractor-chic lawn ornaments. -jsw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 10 Sep 2014 12:49:58 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

It's confined mostly to people who are connected. If you see a pair of rubber molds alongside of the mixer, shaped like huge boots, that's what it is.
--
Ed Huntress
>
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 10 Sep 2014 12:49:58 -0400, "Jim Wilkins"

Just last week I tried to convince my wife that we needed a cement mixer and that this one would be a nice lawn ornament when not in use. She's skeptical. http://maine.craigslist.org/tls/4642527190.html
--
Ned Simmons

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Oooh, who could resist that? It cries out for a hit-and-miss engine to run it.
Doesn't she appreciate that the uncompromisingly functional designs of the 1930's are recognized as legitimate ART? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bauhaus
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dieselpunk
Around here the status lawn toy is a backhoe or loader.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/10/2014 11:15 AM, Jim Wilkins wrote:

I recently poured a 3ft x 6 ft slab. I mixed 3 or 4 batches in a wheel barrel and dumped them into the form. On the last batch I didn't need to much so I only used 1/2 of a bag. I had trouble in the area of that last pour. I could not get it to float, I had stones at the surface where I made the last dump. It could have been me, but I have done several jobs and am especially proud of the last ramp I made, no stones, I broomed the surface, and use it daily, looks great. When you mentioned mixing the "dry ingredients fairly well" It added to my thought that maybe the 1/2 bag was more stone than cement and that's why I couldn't get it to float. Anyway, next time I will throw away a 1/2 bag of concrete I added water to, instead of a 1/2 bag that hardened in the bag :-)
Mikek
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Use a shovel, it works great and it a great exercise.
i
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What's the matter with doing it the way 'short jobs' were done for many decades? Use a mortar box (which you can build with plywood and some 2x6s, and a mixing hoe (A LARGE hoe with two holes in the blade to aid in mixing the mud).
I still do 1/4-1/2 yard jobs that way, and I'm "an old guy". You won't find me mixing a full yard with a hoe; too much work. We have a local 'small job' company that sports a 3-1/2 yard mixer truck.
Lloyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
stryped wrote:

by the time you come up with a way to mix it thoroughly and handle/dump it, you could easily buy a small used one or even a new one from HF Item #67536 3 cu ft $199.99 Grab a 20-25% off coupon and take it home for 150+tax. Will make mixing MUCH easier. Clean it well after each use, grease it good and toss a tarp over it when not in use and you can expect it to be there as long as you need it.
--
Steve W.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Either a box and a mason's hoe, or buy a mixer. I got a decent used one for $50 and $10 or so in gas money via craigslist - otherwise the new/plastic jobbies are pretty cheap new (and pretty cheap, in the "not to be confused with inexpensive" sense, but probably more reliable than whatever silliness you are contemplating with a 55 gallon drum.)
The box and hoe can be quite effective if you learn to use them correctly.
--
Cats, coffee, chocolate...vices to live by
Please don't feed the trolls. Killfile and ignore them so they will go away.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, September 10, 2014 2:14:11 PM UTC-5, Ecnerwal wrote:

I did not realize there was a certain way to mix it in a box. I assumed you just turned everything over with a shovel until it looked consistant. Sort of like you do with pre mix.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/09/14 20:08, Steve W. wrote:

I'd go with buy the mixer and sell when done with. It won't take a big pour and the materials would cost more than a new mixer, at least here in the UK and they're available quite cheaply these days, so I guess you really need to work out the volumes of concrete you need to mix and the materials cost before you start and see if you want to hand mix or use a mixer. Having a mixer takes the hard work of mixing out and the largest I've done was 8' x 8' and about 3" thick for a shed base, moving the material into position was more work than loading the mixer, which did the hard work, which was then poured out and my neighbour gave a hand raking it into position between pours and final tamping to level. I would ask friends and relatives if they have one to borrow as I now have 2 concrete mixers which were given to me free and I wasn't even looking for one. One I changed the belt on and the other needs the belt tightened but other than that haven't cost me more than a belt, both are currently out on loan doing work for a friend and a neighbour. both are UK made Belle mixers so decent kit used by most small builders here and spares readily available if ever needed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

There is a "small batch" mixer that you just roll around on the ground - looks like a 15 gallon barrel
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 10 Sep 2014 22:24:10 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

They're a PITA, too. I made a mortar hoe with a Greenlee punch and found that it was still too much effort to use. I now use a simple soil cultivator (3-tine pointy-toothed rake) and it slides through the dry and wet concrete very easily. The helper I hired for the 135' of fencing I put up last week was very happy with how easy it was to stir the mix with that thing. (Amazon 4-tooth version) http://tinyurl.com/o7g9nvs I use those in the large black tubs, which are getting too hard to find. Most are extruded, and all the corners are super thin lately. (HD tub) http://tinyurl.com/p37jaes
--
Let no man imagine that he has no influence. Whoever he may be, and
wherever he may be placed, the man who thinks becomes a light and a power.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Contractor's wheelbarrow, and a mixing hoe. I've mix a lot of small batches in one.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.