What is it? Set 547

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Rob
Reply to
Rob H.
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3193 morse code receiver? crazy automated mailbox?! 3194 some kind of stopcock turner (I do hope it isn't a fence tightener!) 3195 bale/sheaf cutter, for portioning out feed. 3196 lecture theatre bench (arm rest incorporates area to write on, as long as you're right handed). 3197 I'll guess at school tannoy. 3198 standing wave demonstrator? smoke emitted from holes on resonance?
Reply to
Stanley Daniel de Liver
3194 I must be missing something... This is a monkey wrench, missing the movable jaw and adjusting nut.
3195 Looks like a froe.
3197 Wire recorder microphone?
Reply to
Alexander Thesoso
3193: 3194: Pipe wrench missing the "top" piece? 3195: Hay bail cutter? 3196: School seats? 3197: Taxi microphone? 3198: Silk screen apparatus?
Reply to
mungedaddress
3193 Electric Mailbox 3194 Part of a Pipe Wrench 3195 Finishing Trowel 3196 School or Lecture Bench 3197 Microphone
Reply to
G. Ross
3193 is some sort of wacky electric motor that runs off a dry cell battery. But for the life of me I can't figure out how it's supposed to work. Its design (and the fact that at least two of them exist) leads me to suspect that they are to be used in place of steam engines in a model workshop setup. 3194 is the bottom half of a stilson wrench 3196 Some sort of writing bench. Seems a little short for a classroom. I suspect that it is from someplace like a recruiting office or draft board. Perhaps it is the bench that the Arlo Guthrie sat on in "Alice's restaurant.
Paul K. Dickman
Reply to
Paul K. Dickman
3194 Part of a monkey wrench. The moveable jaw and nut are missing. 3195 Short scythe. 3196 Jury Bench 3197 Speaker from drive in theater.. Missing hook for window, but could be a different type than I usually saw.
Reply to
woodchucker
3193 over-kill rodent trap 3194 the handle from a Stillson (or similar) adjustable wrench. 3195 chaff cutter. 3196 school/college/uni bench for students.
Good set as ever Rob. Thank you, Nick.
Reply to
Nick
Nope, though it does kind of look like a mail box. A large battery fits on the inside of it.
It's been around six weeks since I've posted a fence tool, might be a new record!
You're in the right ballpark.
It was marked as being from somewhere else.
I don't know exactly where this device was used.
Nope
Reply to
Rob H.
Yes, this one is too easy unless someone hasn't seen a pipe wrench in a while.
Nope
Microphone is correct, though I don't know if it's for a wire recorder.
Reply to
Rob H.
Correct
Yes, aka a hay knife.
Nope
Reply to
Rob H.
Yes, it's basically just a toy motor, a video of one running can be seen here:
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Reply to
Rob H.
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Reply to
Alexander Thesoso
Whoa, that's wacky. I like the way the speed is controlled by adjusting the dwell between the contact and the lobe on the crankshaft.
I am still not sure how the other two rods are functioning.
Paul K. Dickman
Reply to
Paul K. Dickman
"Paul K. Dickman" fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@news6.newsguy.com:
It's an _attempt_ at 'continuous motion' cranks that have no dead-center (actually, several, but overlapping).
If you look, you'll see that the rods float in the yoke they pull down. As each rod (top to bottom) bottoms out, the yoke can continue to move downward, being pulled by the next rod down. So each rod has its maximum pull at a different part of the power stroke.
It doesn't _actually_ work to avoid the dead-center problem at the bottom of the power stroke, but it still gives a smoother action to the motor, allowing the power stroke to be developed over a longer throw of the crank, avoiding high-torque and low-torque spots in the stroke.
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
3193 - I think it has something to do with generating a spark gap. Perhaps for wireless telegraphy.
Reply to
Baxter
I got it. That makes sense. I had it my head that they were performing some electrical function, but they are just drumming their fingers in the magnet.
Paul K. Dickman
Reply to
Paul K. Dickman
3197 -- definitely a microphone from a Webster-Chicago/Webcor wire recorder ca. 1940s-1950s. I saw several when I was a youngster.
keep scrolling -- there is a picture.
Northe
Reply to
Northe
Posting from the usenet newsgroup rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
3193) A demonstration electric motor, likely powered by a "type F" dry cell (zinc-carbon) with screw terminals. Based on the size of the "mailbox" structure.
Two electromagnets on the near side, and adjustable spring-loaded switch on the top to apply power to the electromagnets at the crucial point in the rotation of the flywheel.
It looks as though there is a missing part on the end to join the two brass straps -- and act as a switch.
3194) This one is simple -- the handle of a Stilson pipe wrench.
It is missing the jaw, and the threaded and knurled ring which adjusts the position of the jaw.
3195) A knife for cutting something relatively soft by drawing the edge across it -- and likely held in a guide to keep the blade upright.
I can't tell whether there is any kind of tooth on the edge from the photos.
3196) A bench from a school lecture room, since there is no visible storage place for books or paper.
3397) A low-quality hand-held microphone -- likely from a relatively inexpensive tape recorder.
3398) This is an interesting variation on a stringed musical instrument. Given by the apparent fact that the length of the two strings is the same between bridges, and the bottom anchor pins are connected to a pivoted bar, so both strings would have the same tension (aside from frictional losses in the pivot), so I think that it is intended for comparing the pitch of two strings, likely from two batches. Probably used at a factory which packages strings for sale for banjos, guitars, and the like to make sure that the latest batch from the spring wire factory has the same characteristics as the batch most recently sold.
Looks like the "nut" at each end is a glass rod -- a good choice.
Now to post and then see what others may have suggested.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Webster-Chicago made disk cutters, wire recorders and tape recorders. I may have a picture of that microphone in a collection of old service manuals.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell

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