What kind of lathe has V-flat ways rails with 80 degree V angle? - Photo

In "What kind of lathe has V-flat ways rails with 80 degree V angle?" posted on 14 June 2013 to RCM, I asked if anybody could identify a
steady rest with 80-degree included angle Vee-flat ways. I now have a photo and description posted on the metalworking dropbox. (The owner doesn't want the real URL published, to keep spam down.)
Google on Mystery_Steady_Rest.
The filenames are "Mystery_Steady_Rest.txt" and ~.jpg.
Joe Gwinn
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Need to say more as to the base description - and color of paint. Is V on the front or rear. Is it light, dark gray or green or white or .....
Photo would be great.
I'll try to search. Sounds like in the drop box.
Martin
On 6/30/2013 8:42 PM, Joe Gwinn wrote:

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Yep in the drop box.
I suspect it is a Logan or a Sheldon.
I have a Logan made (From Scott) center for my Sheldon.
My guess it is Sheldon from color, but heavy weight machines have strong parts.
That is a nice and heavy looking one.
If the V matches yours - and the dimensions fit - might be good.
But that has been in the database for many years.
Martin
On 6/30/2013 8:42 PM, Joe Gwinn wrote:

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Hmm. I can ask on the Logan reflector.
Is there a Sheldon newsgroup or reflector?

It is quite sturdy.

It almost matches - Clausing Vee is 70 degrees, not 80 degrees.
Center height is the same as Clausing 5900, and space between Vee and Flat is also almost the same.
The under-rail clamp is a tad too small, and has to be cocked to grip the bedrails.

What has been in "the database"? Which database?
Joe

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wrote:

Nice looking rest. Two things, fairly narrow ways for the center height, and maximum diameter it can handle pretty small for the lathe. Was it meant for the tailstock ways? Did some lathe makes offer more than one size steady rest?
Good luck.
Pete Keillor
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I have no idea what the original intent was, but is does fit the tailstock ways of a Clausing 5900 lathe reasonably well.
I've never heard of a lathe having two sizes of steady rest.
Given the small hole diameter and beefy construction, I'd guess it was for a lathe that usually used collets, versus 3-jaw chucks.
Joe Gwinn
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wrote:

I have a steady rest for a lathe that is at least 14" based on its height about the ways..that has a 4" hole in the middle.
Rather fascinating actually.
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    [ ... ]

    Considering that the typical size for a 3-jaw chuck is half the swing (a 4-jaw is typically a bit larger), and the grip with the standard jaws is about half the diameter of the chuck before the back end of the jaws extends too far from the chuck, that might be about right for the grip of standard jaws on a 3-jaw chuck.
    And -- you aren't going to be turning something 14" diameter over the carriage/cross-slide on a 14" lathe, so this is probably pretty reasonable.

    Oh -- my Clausing 5814 (12" swing) seems to be pretty close to 90 degrees on its V-ways.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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