what's involved in re-tinning a steel pot?

I have this Greek baker friend. Today he asked me if I could re-tin a pot, actually a bowl from an industrial mixer. Apparently once upon a time it
was routine to make such bowls from mild steel and tin them to keep them from rusting. But the whisks etc. over the years beat the tin off on the inside and they now say they can't find anyone left in the Pacific Northwest who does re-tinning.
Anyone know how hard this is, and what kind of setup you need? Tinners used to go from door to door, so it seems like it has to be something you can do with a blowtorch and a lump of tin .. ??
Grant
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Grant Erwin wrote:

Hey Grant. Tin a cooking utensil and you'll be a felon. Both of you, as a matter of fact. Tell your friend to quit poisoning his patrons, open his wallet and buy Stainless Steel.
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John R. Carroll
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John R. Carroll wrote:

John,
Could you elaborate? A lot of places re-tin copper pots and pans. For example:
http://www.eastcoasttinning.com / http://www.mmresto.com/index.php?menu_id 
Grant,
I belive the instruction were printed here a couple of years ago. As I remember, melt the tin in the pan, wipe the tin around with cotton waste.
Kevin Gallimore
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From Kevins 1st link:
"First, the old tin is removed from the cookware and the raw copper is prepared to accept new tin. The surfaces are then covered with an acid flux which helps the tin adhere to the copper when heated.
The outer surfaces of the pot are protected with whiting to prevent the hot tin from accidentally sticking to the outside of the pot.
The pot is heated to approximately 450 degrees Farenheit which is the melting point of tin. Pure molten tin is then ladled into the pot and swirled around to coat the desired surfaces. The excess tin is wiped up with a flux coated cotton cloth and the pot is allowed to cool naturally."
CarlBoyd
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"John R. Carroll"
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?????? I see lots of tinned steel food processing equipment in use----pretty much the standard for older commercial mixers. You have a statute or some other evidence to back up that "felon" statement? I don't hear a lot about tin poisoning either---is it common? How does one become poisoned from a tinned mixer bowl in a bakery?
Bill
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BillM wrote:

Tin is lead and zink.
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John R. Carroll
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John R. Carroll wrote:

Sn = Pb + Zn ?
Kevin Gallimore
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Evidently. I'm sure the deadly dihydrogen monoxide must have some part in the reaction.
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I dunno, but over exposure to dihydrogen monoxide kills more people in this country every year than lots of things the extremists want to control or ban.
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You are probably confusing Tin with the highly banned lead/tin solder.
John R. Carroll wrote:

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Highly banned? I have several rolls of lead alloy solder out in the shop. Most recent one was purchased just a year or two ago. I use it regularly for some types of electrical repairs and connections.
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Electrical solder is indeed still tin/lead but all the larger diameter stuff for plumbing is lead free. You can still get some larger diameter tin/lead but not at the local big box places. But don't let the plumbing inspector catch you with tin/lead in the tool box or job site.
Bob La Londe wrote:

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wrote:

Bought some about a month ago at the local hardware store, about a week before I got about three pounds for a buck one Saturday morning. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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"John R. Carroll"
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John R. Carroll

I think you are confusing "tinning"----a soldering term for applying a thin coat of solder (lead based or otherwise), with Tin---an element, atomic number 50, symbol Sn.
The tinning process on mixing and kitchen utensils uses Tin, NOT an alloy of lead and zinc.
Bill
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John R. Carroll wrote:

WHAT? TIN IS TIN. It is a base metallic element. Not an alloy.
No Lead and no Zinc in it.
Pure tin is used to line 99% of the copper pots used in the world, and any plain steel is also tin lined. It is also used to line the storage tanks and most of the systems in many water treatment plants. Why? It is chemically inert in the presence of water and does not taint it as it is processed.
--
Steve W.
Near Cooperstown, New York
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John R. Carroll wrote:

Uh, no. Tin is tin. It is an element.
Grant
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John R. Carroll wrote:

I'm sure you're already being jumped on but --
Tin is tin. 50 electrons, 50 protons, somewhere around 69 neutrons if you buy it from a reputable vendors and not those glowing guys who hang out in Hanford. It's been known ever since folks started making bronze from copper and (get this!) tin!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tin
There may be some alloy of lead and zinc that's called 'tin', and thin sheet steel is called 'tin', and making a thin coating of solder (which is often tin and lead, but not always) is called 'tinning', but those are just colloquial names that mislead one from the basic fact:
Tin is tin.
--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
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Tim Wescott wrote:

Tin is Tin. My bad.
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John R. Carroll
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Tin is an element. It is not a mixture of lead and zinc.
Tin and copper = Bronze. zinc and copper = Brass
Martin Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com /
John R. Carroll wrote:

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On Mon, 28 Jul 2008 17:58:38 -0700, "John R. Carroll"

================Don't confuse terne plate [solder] with tim [an element]. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terne http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tin http://www.fantes.com/tinned-metals.html
In cooking tin plate can be a help to produce very light whipped egg whites marangue as the tin reacts [very slightly] with the egg white protean.
Tin lined cookware is still widely sold but you must be careful not to overheat the pots/pans if you cook in them as opposed to beating eggwhites. http://www.buycoppercookware.com/cat_copper_cookware.cfm
for one retinning vendor see http://www.fantes.com/manuals/retinning_request_form03.pdf
google on <cookware retinning> for >8k hits.
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