what type of press is this?

It's some sort of press with a heavy wheel that spins back and forth and presses on the work using a heavy screw.
No audio needed, just watch about 10 seconds

https://youtu.be/CLcAms8GgeM?tB7

https://youtu.be/CLcAms8GgeM?tB7

What's the history of these, any is it something uncommon in the US?
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https://piehtoolco.com/contents/en-us/d1439.html
I've seen them in a blackmith shop but never in the New England museums or used machinery stores I've visited. That may only mean they sell quickly, like anvils and other desirable small-shop machinery.
The blacksmith had custom forging dies in them to leave his power hammer free for general work. -jsw
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On Friday, February 1, 2019 at 1:11:19 AM UTC-5, Cydrome Leader wrote:

That's a "fly press": a flywheel screw press. No, they aren't common in the US. Apparently they've been around for a long time in forge shops in other parts of the world, including Europe.
I never saw one but I remember seeing photos when I was an editor at American Machinist, back in the '70s.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Interesting.
Are there other regional variations of "basic" machines like presses that still do the same job in the end?
Sort of like how germans were obsessed with slotted screws for absolutely everything forever?
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On Sunday, February 3, 2019 at 8:20:35 PM UTC-5, Cydrome Leader wrote:

nd

the US. Apparently they've been around for a long time in forge shops in o ther parts of the world, including Europe.

erican Machinist, back in the '70s.

I can't think of anything in particular. There are some cases of machine ty pes being associated with the products they make, and the regional emphasis on those products. For example, horological lathes initially were associat ed with the UK, IIRC, and then Switzerland dominated that business. From wh at I saw years ago, Switzerland seemed to have an overwhelming number of th ose little lathes. Lens grinding and polishing machines in Germmany, then i n Japan, etc.
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wrote:

I can't think of anything in particular. There are some cases of machine types being associated with the products they make, and the regional emphasis on those products. For example, horological lathes initially were associated with the UK, IIRC, and then Switzerland dominated that business. From what I saw years ago, Switzerland seemed to have an overwhelming number of those little lathes. Lens grinding and polishing machines in Germmany, then in Japan, etc.
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On Fri, 1 Feb 2019 06:11:16 +0000 (UTC), Cydrome Leader

I'd call it a "rotary inertia" or "worm gear inertia" press and it is not common in North America from what I've seen.
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On Fri, 01 Feb 2019 10:13:12 -0500

That's because Andrew has been hoarding them all in Texas:
https://www.instagram.com/blacksmithtools/p/BYjxXCmjvtY/
Seriously though, he would be a good one to call if you want one. He seems to come across them pretty often...
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typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    Looks like a stamping press. In this case, knocking out 'flatware. Put the blank in it,down comes the die, up goes the die, out comes the spoon / fork. FWIW, Krupp Steel started out supplying those dies.
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wrote:

They were wise to be ready for either war or peace. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guns_versus_butter_model
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typed in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    But when he started, Herr Krupp wasn't the Industrial Powerhouse. Rather a bit of the opposite. E.G., his first mill used water wheels to power the drop hammer (SOP at the time). Which he put on a stream which didn't have enough flow year round.

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wrote:

New England has preserved some of that history. We took a school trip to this place not long after it was restored and they demonstrated the waterwheels and trip hammer and explained the tedious process of squeezing the slag out of a bloom of iron, one of which they had on display. https://www.engr.psu.edu/mtah/photos/photos_saugus.htm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taylor_Mill_State_Historic_Site
When I was little my father bought lumber to repair our 1830 house at a water-powered sawmill. -jsw
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On Sun, 3 Feb 2019 13:54:17 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"

The house I was raised in, was built with exterior walls of two layers of white pine planks on end. these planks were 24 to 36 inches wide, 2 1/2 inches thick and up to 20 feet long. The trees were cut on the property and floated down the river to a water powered mill much like the Taylor Mill with the vertical saw powered by an undershot wheel. This mill combined the saw mill, a planing mill and a grist mill. I never saw the mill but remember well the stone fillled cribs of the dam and flume. We used to use the cast grinding plates from the grist mill as a boat anchor. The site was washed away in the early '50's when an ice jam combined with driftwood in the forebay of the dam gave way and spread everything downstream.
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wrote:

This private NH Christian high school teaches both male and female students the skills needed to restore or duplicate New England structures from the 1700 and 1800's in their original style. http://www.turnermills.com/JesseRemingtonArticle.pdf
Last fall the fair had an exhibit of cutting pine planks as large as yours with a chainsaw running on guides, like the Alaskan mill that Northern sells but bigger. A couple of huge planks were still there during the ham radio flea market a few weeks later.
My sister and her husband have repaired and extended their 17xx Maine farm house using pegged post and beam construction, though not with timbers that large.
I sized the bandsaw mill I built for 20" logs based on the largest trees left in the neighborhood and have had to chainsaw slabs off the stump end of oaks that had been leaning over the house to fit it. Instead of full width planks I've been cutting each log section into two 6" x 12" by 12' beams to store the wood in the form of shed frames. The logs and rough cut beams (cants) dry evenly without cracking too much if the ends are painted with melted toilet ring wax, which unlike paraffin wax is flexible enough to not crack open as the weather changes.
-jsw
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On Mon, 4 Feb 2019 08:39:41 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"

Most excellent! They'll have a very interesting, well-paid career for life. I watched a couple timber frame class workshops on YT and have always loved the look of timber framed buildings.

Cool. Don't the tree huggers crusade against the old-growth destruction? They sue every single timber sale in Oregon nowadays, without missing one.

Yeah, that was over the top.

I wonder what's in those "wax" rings today.
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wrote:

I think the broader intent is to instill the confidence to take on a difficult task in cooperation with others.
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On Mon, 18 Feb 2019 20:27:46 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"

Timberframing definitely does build teamwork. Kudos for a smarter syllabus, JRHS.
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On Sun, 17 Feb 2019 18:50:43 -0800, Larry Jaques

Door-Ease stick lubricant is a very similar soft wax. We use it at work on the latches on top of bulk trucks. Lasts longer than oil or grease in a high dust environment... Have thought of toilet wax as a cheaper substitute but worry it is more likely to contain nasty stuff. Plus it would be far less convenient for the few dollars saved. Made by AGS and they also make a version for NAPA that looks identical other than the label.
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On Sun, 3 Feb 2019 13:54:17 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"

Really cool.
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wrote:

The sawmill was a commercial operation. I didn't realize it was powered by water until they opened a hatch in the floor and showed me the Francis turbine in the stream under the building. The dam, pond and an ice house were on the other side of the road. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_turbine
Unlike a vertical wooden water wheel, a Francis turbine in operation is as picturesque as a garbage disposal. There are others still generating micro-hydro electricity around here, including one under the mill building space the blacksmith rents. https://www.des.nh.gov/organization/divisions/water/wmb/rivers/instream/souhegan/documents/notado.pdf Notice how many small dams are or were a hydropower generating facility.
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