which capacitor

I'm on the home stretch on the pump project. I want to replace the
capacitors, they are 22 years old. here's the specs:
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Start Capacitor 270-324 MFD, 330 V 1 275468119 305208919
Run Capacitor 40 MFD, 370 V 2 155327114 305203914
I can see the size, but what kind of capacitors do i order? I'd just as sonn
order generic capacitors and not go through franklin.
P.S. While trying to shove two lbs. of wire in a one lb. box i used a screw
driver to pry a whole group of wire over. I cut through the insulation and
burned a large screwdriver damn near in two and left large brown and yellow
spots in my shorts. Took a couple hours to repair the burned wiring.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
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IN all probability these are just ordinary motor start and run caps. If you can do business with Granger try them or a motor repair place, or some electrical supply houses also might have them.
Chuck P.
Reply to
Pilgrim
Grainger. Mouser. Or eBay if you have time.
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Reply to
Richard J Kinch
Perhaps most importantly, make certain that the replacement capacitors are marked that they are rated xxxVAC, not DC (not DC or DCV or VDC or WVDC, or red/black-plus/minus markings). The voltages you listed are common voltage values in AC capacitors, but choosing a slightly higher voltage rating will be OK, if that's what they have on hand.
Most industrial suppliers will know what you need, but if you encounter the FNG/my first week worker, see that the person looks at AC motor capacitors. Sometimes also referred to as oil-filled, but not completely accurate/true in all cases.
WB ......... metalworking projects
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Reply to
Wild_Bill
McMaster, Grainger, Johnstone have them. And motor run caps also make good substitutes for HID lamp ballast capacitors, I usually run to Johnstone for run caps because smaller electrical wholesalers usually don't have a good selection.
The sizes make the selections semi-idiot proof, but you need electrolytic start and run caps - they will be rated for this. The start caps are intended to be used for 3 to 5 seconds at a shot, and a stated number of cycles an hour - short-cycle the motor and the cap can overheat and fail.
Run caps are generally rated continuous duty.
This is why they invented the stick and the wire spudging tool (looks like a solid plastic tongue depressor with a v-notched point at one end) - wood is reasonably non-conductive and plastic is normally a very good insulator.
If you don't have the right tools and absolute confidence that you won't short something out accidentally, you are supposed to shut off the power first.
And if you are going to make a habit of doing this when you know darned well what's going to happen next... It's time to either retire or switch to Depends. Or both.
-->--
PS: Sears has wised up, they won't take that screwdriver back.
Reply to
Bruce L. Bergman
Over the years, how many pair of underwear have you had to throw away before their time? I can only remember three myself.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
there is almost NO chance that 40 and 340 uf capacitors in this use will be oil filled - they will be AC rated electrolytics.
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Reply to
William Noble
Panties? I thought you were a butch lesbian. Long sleeved flannel shirts, jeans and boots. I never suspected that you were were a lipstick lesbian! ;-)
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
Dont forget the truckers wallet on a chain..... The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who in times of great moral crisis maintain their neutrality", John F. Kennedy.
Reply to
Gunner Asch
I got my pair of submersible pump caps from Grainger a couple weeks back. The ones that came out were generic, ditto for the new ones. $17 for the two of them. Make sure you match both the capacitance and the voltage. For your installation, I'd probably sub a 440 volt rating for the 370 volt on the run cap, only a couple bucks more.
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Karl Townsend wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
Karl
If this part of your message is NOT in jest, then I hope you are replacing the one pound box with a 4 pound box. IMHO here is nothing worse than a too small enclosure for any electrical wiring. The peace of mind will be worth the effort and expense.
Also if you are going to get the larger box look at disconnect switches, that are enclosed in larger boxes to save money. Of course remove the interior switching components and just utilize the box.
Reply to
Bob AZ
Just because I always wear Dockers and "Dickies" pocket T-shirts doesn't mean I can't be comfortable...underneath.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
This is the main circuit panel inside my house. There is now only one more breaker to install. Panel is clear full.
Say, I think I've got newserver trouble. No posts showed up (even mine) till just now. I see five responses total. Everybody else see the same?
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
I'm seeing something like 7 direct responses and 11 including the replies.
Karl Townsend wrote:
Reply to
RoyJ
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Let me guess -- this was a piston style quick-change toolpost. :-)
Good thing that nobody got hit by the handle -- or the fragments of the ball grip on the end of it.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Yea, it was a cheap piston-type. Does a wedge type limit the handle travel? It's not the tool post's fault, it was an ID-TEN-T error. Truly the most frightening thing I have experienced in a long while!
Reply to
Tom Gardner
That, or it was just an excuse to go lingerie shopping! ;-)
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
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Yes it does. The wedge style (at least the Aloris and the Phase-II clone) rotate a coarsely threaded sleeve which moves the wedges up and down. The threads and the travel of the wedges limits the rotation of the locking handle to maybe 120 degrees rotation at the most, from near parallel to the tailstock to slightly towards the check but well out of reach of the jaws, even when facing to the center of a workpiece. *And* -- the wedge style locks at the same position whether you are using the turning station or the boring/facing station (dovetail) so you don't have to adapt your practices when you switch stations.
I had actually chosen the wedge style and purchased it before I saw the behavior of the handle on the piston style (at a Cabin Fever)-- and just *seeing* it scared me, without ever hanging it on a lathe.
This is one of the reasons which I usually use when suggesting a wedge style as the better choice.
I'll bet.
But it should be possible to drill and tap a hole in the corner of the toolpost to limit the travel of the handle. Except that it has to rotate another 90 degrees to lock on the facing/boring station instead of the turning station.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Sorry to disagree; you are correct that the 340uF starting cap is a bi-polar electrolytic, but the 40uF run cap would be either a paper oil-filled AC capacitor or perhaps a dry polypropylene AC capacitor. Electrolytic caps are not suitable for continuous AC heavy current duty, and are not used as motor run capacitors. They may look externally similar.
Regards.
Chas.
(To email me change 'xxx' to letters tango papa golf.)
Reply to
Chas
OK, you are right - it was the "oil filled" I was trying to correct - a 40 uf oil filled cap is pretty large (the 20 uf I have is 6X3X6 aprox)
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Reply to
William Noble

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