Why use brass?

Why might a doctor use brass for her nameplate on the outside wall and
why is the material suitbale for this purpose?
Reply to
Albert
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I think I know this one. Brass is 'soft' so it engraves easier than some other metals. And it polishes up nice.
How's that? :-)
Reply to
jim.blakely
And if your asked questions like this by your teacher, the answers in the textbook. Read it - full of all sorts of interesting stuff.
Andrew VK3BFA.'
Reply to
Andrew VK3BFA
Your implies ownership: "your pen" , "your kipper" etc
You're is an abbreviation for 'you are' as in "You're getting mixed up."
AWEM (sorry to be pedantic)
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
Sorry - I accept the correction. Should have been "yore teacher" cause hes been around for Ever or "yaw teacher" cause hes swaying slightly ( Or "that ignorant b**** who is wanting me to do some work and hasnt written the answer on the blackboard"
Andrew VK3BFA.
Reply to
Andrew VK3BFA
You left out one important feature. Brass has the appearance of gold to the untrained eye. Gold has been cherished as long as it's been known, so anything that appears to emulate it tends to be desirable.
Harold
Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos
Along with what others have said about "easy to clean" and it's shiny and looks nice, just plain old "That's how we've always done it."
Before machine engraving was available, they would have been of cast metal. Iron and brass/bronze were the common products for casting. Cast iron rusted, and all other materials were either too soft, or too hard. And casting supported "raised lettering" too, which direct engraving tends not to (or at least is more cost intensive).
Take care.
Brian Lawson, Bothwell, Ontario.
Reply to
Brian Lawson
Andrew sez:
"> Your implies ownership: "your pen" , "your kipper" etc
That's OK, Andrew! Your friendly admonition is greatly acceptable. Thanks! RCM has become a haven for those that abuse the English language... Frankly, I tend to pass over messages couched in careless vernacular, such as the misuse of pronouns. Some RCM respondents have the proclivity to inject the appearance of "ignorance" in their messages as if this will elicit more accurate answers from the readership. I think not!
Sincerely yourses,
Bob Swinney
Reply to
Robert Swinney
Yeah! Like for a very long time. There is a large monument in Paris, built completley from melted-down bronze cannon.
Bob Swinney
Reply to
Robert Swinney
"Robert Swinney" wrote: (clip) There is a large monument in Paris, built completley from melted-down bronze cannon. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Beat *your* swords into plowshares. Cast *your* cannon into nameplates. *You're* the one who makes the choices. *Your* teacher is the one who asks the questions.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
It would be rather silly to use a brass nameplate on the inside wall, since the diplomae and certificates displayed there identify the occupant.
Let's hope the doc actually did her own homework and earned her diplomae....
Reply to
Don Foreman
"Don Foreman" wrote: Let's hope the doc actually did her own homework and earned her diplomae.... ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ When I was in school, learning to repair Multi's, we were given "problems" on the machines to diagnose and fix, and we were allowed to use any of the facilities available in the classroom. One of the students used the phone, to call Tech Support.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Then there are those of us who have a maimed little finger and have a devil of a time getting to the ' key, so have over the years, on these informal newsgroups...shortcutted to "your" rather than the more proper "you're".
Its homage to the goals of Liberal mandated outcome based education..where spelng relay don mattr juz as lon az you feal gud aboot yorself.
Gunner
The aim of untold millions is to be free to do exactly as they choose and for someone else to pay when things go wrong.
In the past few decades, a peculiar and distinctive psychology has emerged in England. Gone are the civility, sturdy independence, and admirable stoicism that carried the English through the war years . It has been replaced by a constant whine of excuses, complaints, and special pleading. The collapse of the British character has been as swift and complete as the collapse of British power.
Theodore Dalrymple,
Reply to
Gunner
Still, it corrodes rather less readily than mild steel, for example. And, perhaps more importantly, a little corrosion on a name plate doesn't look too ugly. Sometimes it produces quite a nice patina.
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy

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