WTB Bridgeport Mill

Hi Guys,
I am strictly a hobbyist who has always loved tools and machinery. I
currently have a SB Heavy 10, Clausing Variable Speed Drill press and a
Clausing 8520 Milling Machine. I also have a ton of woodworking machines
but we'll discuss that at a later date :-).
I am interested in sellin the Clausing Mill and getting a Bridgeport. I
live in Middletown, NJ.
I figure the collective wisdom of this group can guide me to places where I
may find a Bridgeport for a decent price. I would also appreciate any other
comments or advise including what I should check for when looking a mill. I
have a 6 cylinder dodge Dakota but I'm not sure I could transport a
ridgeport with it, so shipping costs must be taken into account.
Thanks to all in advance for the help.
Joe...
Reply to
JB
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Got a truck and want to visit Cleveland?
Reply to
Tom Gardner
I would also be interested in opinions on comparible milling machines made by lesser known manufacturers.
Thanks again.
Joe...
Reply to
JB
I wish I had the time Tom :-). Six kids leaves little time or money for anything else. My wife will want to kill me when she finds out that I'm looking for a larger mill :-). Oh well, we only live once!!
Thanks.
Joe..
Reply to
JB
If you decide to go for like new, see
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You can buy a rebuilt machine from them. I did in 1995 and have been very happy with it.
Randy
Reply to
R. O'Brian
Those guys at Machinery Values seem to define the top of the market, so you could visit them and find out what not to pay.
I have always had good luck with small private machine dealers, we have the "Want AD" in mass, must be a similar thing in NJ. Usually takes a little time to find just the right machine
Vari speed and chrome up the price, as does a 12 inch vs 9 inch knee.
Personally for a home shop I would get a step pulley[much quieter] in the smallest size you think you need, because they feel nicer[less weight moving around] and fit places better. If the iron[not the paint] is very pretty, don't worry about chrome, you will never wear it out.
I have a Lagun at work, feels like crap but dials to the number. Also put lots of hours on SHarp mills, very few problems.
If you can find a reasonable rigger, it takes a lot of stress out of your life.
JB wrote:
Reply to
yourname
I suggest you plan on either buying a machine with a DRO or installing one after you get the machine. That lets you quit worrying about the precision or absolute accuracy of the dials and leadscrews, and just worry about the spindle and the ways, etc. I also wanted a Bridgeport brand mill (and got one) but I'd take any decent industrial knee mill if I had it to do over again. Be aware that if you buy a naked machine (no vise, no collets, no end mill holders, no parallels, no hold-downs, no boring head, no cutters ..) you may spend quite a bit to get it tooled all the way up, so it's always better to buy it from a private party who bought it new and is willing to "throw in" a lot of extras.
There has been much written about moving milling machines. Google Tells All.
GWE
JB wrote:
> Hi Guys, > > I am strictly a hobbyist who has always loved tools and machinery. I > currently have a SB Heavy 10, Clausing Variable Speed Drill press and a > Clausing 8520 Milling Machine. I also have a ton of woodworking machines > but we'll discuss that at a later date :-). > > I am interested in sellin the Clausing Mill and getting a Bridgeport. I > live in Middletown, NJ. > > I figure the collective wisdom of this group can guide me to places where I > may find a Bridgeport for a decent price. I would also appreciate any other > comments or advise including what I should check for when looking a mill. I > have a 6 cylinder dodge Dakota but I'm not sure I could transport a > ridgeport with it, so shipping costs must be taken into account.
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Thank you Grant. I can see that this is a daunting task. Freeing up cash is always a problem. I too always wanted a Bridgeport hence my inquiries. My clausing has served me well but it is a bare machine with no DRO and only a set of collets.
I'm 45 years old, I hope to one day have a full sized Knee Mill preferably a Bridgeport :-).
Thanks for the input.
Joe...
Reply to
JB
You would do well selling your current mill. Here in CT I see the Bridgeports going for about $2500 in good shape with options, even some with DRO. 6 kids??? how the hell do you have time to use your machines, I have 2 kids and its hard to find much time. My wife gives me crap about the tools I bring home too, but I have done some real nice custom work around the house. My son has some real cool toys that the other kids on the bus can't buy at walmart. I picked up a Millport with DRO, Kurt vise, Full set of collets, right angle head (I have no use for the right angle head but it was with it) and a few other extras. The price was far less than the Bridgeports in the area. My dad has a mint Bridgeport and it is no different to run than my millport. here iis a link
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Reply to
Waynemak
Waynemak,
Thanks for the input. Yes, not much time for myself after running around with the kids, not much money either :-). I am getting lots of advice about not being fixated on a Bridgeport. I want a good mill that is a bit heavier than my clausing 8520 and I don't want to buy junk or some unknown brand that uses non standard tooling. gain, I appreciate your help, it certainly has enlightened me. Your mill looks nice. Is it American made?
Regards.
Joe...
Reply to
JB
My mill is a Bridgeport clone, that being said it is not junk. Some of the imports are better than others. Most of the parts on mine are interchangeable with the BP. I do think the BP is a nice sized machine, it is not to bad to move, parts are out there and its built good. Its best to buy a machine with R-8 collets that will most likely save you money in the end. Good luck on your purchase."JB" wrote in message news: snipped-for-privacy@comcast.com...
Reply to
Waynemak
Rent a trailer to tow behind that Dakota. should be fine.
Tom Gardner wrote:
Reply to
Rex B

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