3 phase electricity meter

I wonder if the more electrically knowledgeable than me can advise me on a question/problem
The landlord of the yard where my workshop is has realised that he is paying
all the electricity bills, he's not that quick, as I only ever had 2 bills in ten years.
Now he has a new business partner, with a brain, the finger is starting to point at me who is using all the 3 phase.
I want to put my own meter in the workshop as I can sense me paying over the odds for a long time and a big dispute erupting. I need to know if the ones I see on ebay
Item number: 270082541197 Item number: 130072649113
are suitable. Advice needed then as to what type I need. I wont be doing the installation myself I hasten to add Thanks Bob
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paying
the
Either should do but we don't know what your max load current is. The second one quotes 100a per phase . This is like 3 domestic houses worth with plenty of margin. The first one does not state the current but is possibly similar but to be sure - ask the seller.
Both look quite new and should be in spec but you might want to test their accuracy (use an electic fire or something similarly simple) before using it formally to base your bill on.
hth
Bob
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Many thanks for the advice bob

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I should add I will only be pulling 3 phase power for the machinery. There is no neutral in the yard, single phase is supplied on a seperate feed. The old trick of tapping single phase from 3 phase is only possible if using the earth as neutral, and that I'm told is a bit on the naughty side. bob

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Also dangerous.You have two problems here.One,the meter will need a neutral and two,if the landlords partner is as switched on as you think, he`s going to want to put his meter in which he will have had calibrated and as it`s an industrial supply he can charge what he wants.I would sit tight and see what they propose. Mark.

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On Sun, 28 Jan 2007 22:25:04 -0000, "Emimec"

Almost all electromechanical meters will require a neutral connection, the first one does and is represented by 4W in the model number meaning 4wires (3 phase + N) the second one does'nt state but I'm prety certain it does. For the purposes of billing you really need a calibration certificate. Have a look at this web page
http://www.pjwmeters.com/power303.html
you will need some current transformers too:
http://www.pjwmeters.com/page16.html
Not cheap cheap but it'll do everything you want and if you get split core transformers they are almost a diy fit.
Hope that helps Graham
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Graham Thanks for the links, it does help. I would be better off with a digital one for a start. I have been advised I can use the single phase neutral....... I'll keep out of it all I think, because I don't understand heavy electrics, why would I need a transformer ? Bob
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On Mon, 29 Jan 2007 19:37:39 -0000, "Emimec"

You would actually need 3 transformers, most meters require the incoming supply to be "broken", instead you place current transformers around the individual supply tails, these pick up how much current is flowing and the meter converts that to a number. If you use the split type, you can just clip them on. Most meters are battery powered and don't require any other power, hence a DIY job, even if it does need a supply, a plug and socket will usually suffice. If the supply is separate I personally would not mix the 2 and use the other neutral, to do so would in my opinion be very danerous, but without seeing the setup...... As the other poster mentioned, you really should have a chat to your landlord first.
Graham
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You would not need ct`s (current transformers)unless you have a large supply.Normally 200 amps and up a phase.On 100 amps the meter would go inline. Mark.
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On 29 Jan 2007 13:22:37 -0800, " snipped-for-privacy@ems-fife.co.uk"

Correct, but the meter I linked too does need them, all the inline ones I found needed a neutral.... His setup seems unusual as in 15 years I've never come across a 3 phase incoming supply with no neutral. A lot of machines need one to supply the control gear and things like lights.....
Graham
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A few thoughts: Does your tenancy agreement allow you to do any work on the supply?, even if it does it probably requires it to be certificated, breaching the tenancy would be bad... Would a landlord be obliged to take any notice of a second hand, uncalibrated meter that a tenant fitted and used to dispute the bill? What would your insurance do if you had a claim related to a DIY job on a 3 phase supply? Is your landlord so bad you can't discuss the situation with him? Greg
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