Computer power usage

Having just received the latest missives relating to European directives - this time relating to power usage reduction - an interesting question came to
mind.
Is M$ Windows compliant :)
I've got a laptop in on the bench to try and fix. It belongs to a student who does not have much money so I'm doing it more as a favour but it is not cooperating. Basically windows seemed to be corrupt, and since everything of importance has been saved, re-installing seems the best option, except that stalls after a while.
OK - Hardware problem? So run the Linux disk since it has some nice hardware test programs. Memory test - several passes without a problem. Hardware test - failed on hard disk! Plug in a spare hard disk - since I normally have a couple in stock for the Mach-in-a-box orders. Hardware test runs fine, so install Linux on new disk - all runs fine and the machine works great! Leave it running some animations for a day because I don't have time to install Windows - no problems. When I get around to running windows install on the new disk it fails at almost the same point it did before. :(
What I had noticed was that the cooling fan while kicking in at switch on, it did not seem to start while running on Linux so is this a cooling fan problem? On the Acer machines I can force it on via the BIOS, but not with this HP machine, so having a DivisionMaster box sitting on the bench I sat it on that and blew some air through the fan hole. ( Again unlike the Acer - you can't get at the cooling fan without pulling the whole machine apart :( ) With this set-up the machine works better, but obviously the throttle back to reduce power consumption is kicking in. Something that was not obvious using Linux and I had not considered originally, since normally the cooling fan does not kick in until a laptop is well up and running.
I'll pick up one of the external cooling panels for laptops on Monday to get around having to try and find someone who can replace the internal one, which looks more like a problem with the driver rather than the fan anyway! But the fact that the machine worked fine for a day with Linux on and I even edited a letter via OpenOffice is at least curious.
The obvious things that come to mind are the fact that there is no indication on the laptop that it IS having a problem due to overheating - it's not as hot as my own laptop so IS that the problem :( There are no test tools available on any current Windows disks - hence the need to use Linux discs to test the machine - but do I just return the machine with Linux on :) Having had a quote of £100 to replace the fan - which I'm not convinced is the problem yet - is it economic to repair. The machine is only 2 years old, so throwing it away is stupid.
I'm just prattling on because in trying to do someone a favour I'm just wasting time I do not have. Anybody got any ideas WHAT I should do next with this machine? It's owner is going back to university Wednesday so I'm now running out of time :(
And back to the original thought, of cause since Vista apparently needs twice as much power to run should we simply be avoiding it to comply with these new rules :) If I install XP instead of Vista do I get a better energy rating when I sell the machine? Is *IS* relevant since *I* am the person supplying Mach-in-a-box and required to comply with the regulations!
--
Lester Caine - G8HFL
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Have you looked on the HP website to see if there is a fix, or any mention of this problem for your particular model ?
Peter
PS: Vista is worth avoiding, most of the machines that we have aren't up to running it anyway.
-- Peter & Rita Forbes Email: snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk http://www.oldengine.org/members/diesel http://www.stationary-engine.co.uk
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Peter A Forbes wrote:

Well I have proven that it's the cooling fan now. Hooked up a bigger one to blow through the machine and it's working fine now. So I'll drop the old hard disk back in and see what happens now :)
THEN I need to see if there is a more practical internal fix ;)
--
Lester Caine - G8HFL
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wrote:

Don't know if this will help your particular machine, but I have used this fan control utility for several years on my Dell Precision M60 laptop and can highly recommend it. Controls fan speeds and switch on/off points, and displays CPU & GPU temperatures and loads. http://www.diefer.de/i8kfan/index.html
Peter
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Hi Peter,
I use a Precision M70 at the moment, so I'm interested in this. Why doesn't the in-built thermal control work properly, or what would I gain from using this one instead? I haven't had any issues, and it has been left running for up to 24hrs.
Regards Kevin
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On Sun, 06 Jan 2008 19:05:58 +0000, Kevin

Hi Kevin
The normal fan switch-on temperature on th M60 is set pretty high (can't remember exactly, but some stupid high point), and as a result it only seemed to come on after everything got too hot , and then slowed things to a crawl while the processor etc cooled down.
This was a real pain when doing large CAD assemblies as I'm sure you know, so when I found this little free utility it was a blessing.
Obviously the fan comes on a lot more often now this is installed, but 3 1/2 years on has kept things running well, if occasionally a little noisy when it ramps it up to full speed.
You can select the temperatures for 4 levels of fan speed, and 4 different profiles from meeting/office/games/normal, and it also displays the CPU temp in the lower r/h toolbar.
The speedswitch XP utility from the same guy is useful too.
Peter
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I also noticed that some suppliers are shipping laptops/PCs with XP as Vista seams to be unpopular. I would think that XP is a better optoin.
Chris.
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Surely the user is not at fault for using a LAPTOP on TOP of their LAP?! It is more like the manufacturers fault for building a machine that will not function in the way that the name implies it will.
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Does not Windows have some nonsense about complaining if certain components are changed? Something to do with not installing on multiple machines?
Might be worth querying a Gates' World FAQ site?
MH
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Hit that one every time I replace a hard disk or motherboard. M$ keep insisting that I need a new licence, but it's the *SAME* machine so the *EXISTING* licence is still legal. After a repair job, the machine will not allow you to update or authenticate via the internet. So you switch to the phone - run through the manual activate until you get told that you are a pirate - *THEN* when you ring back again you can get at an operator who will sort you out.

Why waste the time. They never listen :( I'm expecting even more fun with Vista, but perhaps we can convince M$ that *REPAIRING* a computer does not make you a pirate and get them to provide a *SIMPLE* phone number for activating a repaired machine !!!!
And the laptop is working fine with a fan bolted on the bottom :) I wiped the old hard disk and rebuilt it and it seems to be OK *AND* I did not have a problem activating windows which *IS* a first :)
--
Lester Caine - G8HFL
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Surely if you have the original CD, it is just a matter of running install again?
Never had that one yet, but we do have half a dozen legit Win2kPro installation packs to use.
Peter -- Peter A Forbes Prepair Ltd, Rushden, UK snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk http://www.prepair.co.uk http://www.prepair.eu
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Prepair Ltd wrote:

'Product activation' - on XP this generates a security key based on the hardware, once that key is activated against the serial number you can't change any key hardware. So installing again on a new hard disk gives trouble. ADD to that the fact that the serial number may be locked to a particular installation CD - which the customer may not even have been supplied with - and you then have even more fun :(

No problem with W2k - in fact I keep dropping back to that if the XP key will not work!
--
Lester Caine - G8HFL
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wrote:

Many laptop manufactures do not provide instalation CDs. There may be in system partition on the hard disk which allows you to re-instate the OS if it becomes corrupt but if you need to replace the hard disk, you are fcuked. Some laptops manufactures expect the end user to create their own recovery cds from tools installed on the machine. I wonder how many users actually do this?
XP cd keys. Before (re-)installing you need the correct type of media for the Key you have. There are three types of XP CDs- OEM, Retail Box and Volume license and each type can be - original without any service pack, with SP1, with SP2. A key for an OEM SP1 cd will be rejected if trying to install from an OEM SP2 CD.
The other thing worth remembering is that OEM manufactures do not use the serial number from the label stuck to the PC. Each manufacturer has a generic pre-activated set of serial numbers which they use for there machines. If you reinstall from a recovery cd provided by the manufacturer, the serial number may be "slipsteamed" in the cd so you don't need to enter it. If you reinstall using the serial number from the label, it will need to be activated andmay fail the automatic process so you need to phone MS. I found a partial list on the net once of these serial numbers for some common OEM manufactures e.g. Dell and HP
Since there are all these potential issues with serial numbers and product activation, Microsoft provide the means to reactivate a system even if it means phoning them up and I have never had a problem phoning them. My guess is that MS reccon that phoning them up will scare off most pirates that they don't ask too many questions and just give you the code to activate you OS. If you phone up every day trying to activate the same serial number then maybe they will get suspicious.
Archie
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I remember when we got four Digital laptop computers with Windows95 pre-installed. I, as the systems administrator, religiously used the provided utility to re-create the media just-in-case. 22 floppies per laptop :-(
Mark Rand RTFM
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When I were a lad, the OS (CP/M) used to fit on a single 128Kb 8" floppy disk. :-)
Archie
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When I were a lad there weren't any floppy discs - you had to load the OS from paper tape (having first punched the program onto the paper tape with a blunt needle of course) ;-)
regards, Tony
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Crikey!
We'll be down to the stone tablet with hieroglyphics at this rate..... Peter -- Peter A Forbes Prepair Ltd, Rushden, UK snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk http://www.prepair.co.uk http://www.prepair.eu
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Well it was Holerith cards for me. Took ages to punch a program, and woe betide you if you dropped the bundle that was your program, as they didn't have sequential numbering (dahik !)
AWEM
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Andrew Mawson wrote:

Writing the program name on the top edge of the bunched cards helped when the ubiquitous rubber band broke and dumped the lot on the floor. :-(
Tom
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Tony Jeffree wrote:

I still have the floppy disk copy of the Windows for Workgroups development kit - 60 odd? (but I would not let any children look at it - the language used for some comments would even get censored today)

I can remember trundling over to Guildford Collage with stacks of 'mark sense' cards. Black pencil marks for each hole to be punched! Usually two or three round trips to get a working set of cards :( Guildford had an ICL1900 with 16kb words of core store - 16bit I think so switching back to 8 bit processors was another backwards step.
( So we are nearly back to stone tables Peter :) )
--
Lester Caine - G8HFL
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