Dental amalgam?

wrote:


Given time, I'll get back to you, but I'm on 9-month checkup intervals so might be some time.
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My guess is that you were trying to snip the metal peg used to anchor the filling to the tooth. I don't what metal is used, but it needs to be strong and resistant to corrosion so titanium would not be unreasonable.
Cliff Coggin.
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On Wed, 31 Oct 2012 08:52:40 -0000, "Cliff Coggin"

I had a good firend many years ago who was a dental technician. He offered to lost wax cast some wheels for me in left over metal from his day job. I asked what machining allowances he would leave and he said none, since the castings would be spot on, and my machine tools wouldn't touch it in any case. :-)
Jim.
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JimGuthrie@?.?.invalid writes

This would not be amalgam, it would almost certainly be the metal used for making crowns.
David
--
David Littlewood

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David Littlewood wrote:

Gold? (but remove thee gems first)
--
Old Nick

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It was definitely what the dentist had teased out to prevent there being a ridge on the top of the tooth, and was flush with the rest of the tooth, except the bit that had broken away underneath.
Moral: Go easy on the pork crackling!
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On Tuesday, October 30, 2012 11:51:14 PM UTC, gareth wrote:

The answer to your question is NO:
1. Dental amalgam is a prescription only product provided only to dentists 2. It has to be mixed from alloy powder and mercury liquid in an appropriate machine with safeguards in case of mercury spillage. 3. Dental amalgam is brittle with a high compressive strength but weak in thin section, and certainly no good for cutting hard substances. 4. Mercury vapour is released (in tiny amounts) when it is abraded or cut. 5. It can be easily cut with diamond burs or tungsten carbide burs 6. Someone else posted that the sharp edge may have been a threaded retention pin for the filling. This may be true in which case it is most likely titanium.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com writes

All good points except 1 - anyone with some mercury can make it by mixing with the appropriate powdered metals. Maybe not as safely as you describe, but...
David
--
David Littlewood

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On 30/10/12 23:51, gareth wrote:

If you can snip it with side cutters, it isn't as hard as insert material. Not even close.
-- Peter Fairbrother
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There's a big difference between snipping and snapping.
eg. Try a bit of 2mm tool steel after quenching but before annealing.
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gareth wrote:

Strange stuff silver. I wanted to do a bit of fauk damascening on steel, and melted some silver on a charcoal block, then added about its same volume of lead-based solder.
The resulting alloy wouldn't work - club-hammer and anvil made no impression. Zirconium alloys - eat yer heart out!
--
Old Nick

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