diamond cut-off wheels?

Does anyone know where to get small diamond cut-off wheels (you might call
them slitting saws if you prefer)?
The usual diamond disks have layers of diamond on the flat surfaces of a
metal wheel. They are fairly useless at slitting - cut a teeny bit and the
metal wheel is exposed on the edge, and you are trying to cut with the metal
wheel, not diamond.
Thanks
Oh, and why don't bandsaws have a double vice to hold both the stock and the
cut-off piece? That way you can slice short bits at a right angle. If you
only have a single vice it goes squint, always, guaranteed.
Reply to
Peter Fairbrother
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Alan gave us the solution to that problem a few days ago:
band saw vice have a look at my web site page here:
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Reply to
Kevin Steele
Depends how big you are after. You can get inexpensive diamond saws that are made for cutting ceramic tiles - not tried them for metal cutting but might be worth a go.
Regards, Tony
Reply to
Tony Jeffree
Have a look at
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don't know if it has what you want but the company specialises in small diamond and carbide tools.
Cliff Coggin.
Reply to
Cliff Coggin
Have you tried
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?
John Ambler Sussex, UK Return E-mails to snipped-for-privacy@skiprat.net
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Reply to
John Ambler
Thanks for the suggestion. Nice site. Unfortunately while they sell (expensive!) "diamond slitting disks", these are still made with "Diamond coating on both sides and the edge" rather than solid diamond in a matrix. Once the edge coating goes they won't slit, and I want to use them on inconel where the coating won't last long.
Has anyone got any other suggestions for making thin slits in inconel? A HSS slitting saw will quickly get blunt. I have some solid carbide milling cutters that cut okay, but they make a cut that is too wide. Do they make solid carbide slitting saws?
Reply to
Peter Fairbrother
Yes, I believe J&L stock them, no book handy at the moment and I hate web ordering sites. -- Regards,
John Stevenson Nottingham, England.
Visit the new Model Engineering adverts page at:-
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Reply to
John Stevenson
What about laser cutting? -- Dave Baker
Reply to
Dave Baker
Thank you, they do.
Only 0.3 mm thick, so I guess you have to be careful not to snap them (especially at the price), but that was most useful, and I would never have found it on google.
The J&L site is pretty bad. In fact most engineering websites are pretty bad. Which is a shame,
as it only takes half a day to learn to write HTML and cgi scripts, and maybe a week's practice to get good at it. I don't know why, but it seems to take very much longer - sometimes a lifetime - to learn that you should always write in HTML/cgi, and only in HTML/cgi. And only then use a good html checker.
No flash/shockwave, unless you are an animation, pop culture or games company. No XML or bleeh XTML etc, no java unless you really need it - do you really _need_ java? couldn't it be done in html/cgi? or are you just using java because you like it?
And no output from html/webpage writing programs. You know who you are. Shame on you.
Handwritten html is also good for simplicity of operation - you do NOT want your customers waiting 15 seconds for your page to dislay because it's waiting for a button .gif that's located on a different server in a different country, and which might become unavailable anyway ...
Demand that any on-page ads are served from a fast server - waiting for slow ads to be served before a page will display is the PITS OF HELL!! as far as your customers are concerned. Even if you don't have customers, and rely on advertising revenue to provide a service, the ad server should always deliver a file faster than the main server, even at peak times. Write that into your ad contract.
Session cookies only, plus one long-term cookie if you must. Only one!
No logon required unless the customer is actually_buying_something_right_now - if he's only browsing, let him, tempt him with your wares, don't annoy him by asking for a logon, he might go away and miss the offer that would tempt him to eventually become your biggest customer - bandwidth is cheap, especially if you have 1 kB handwritten html files rather than 200 kB files from a program that writes html badly for lazy and indifferent people.
Reply to
Peter Fairbrother
small
Don't be so sure the coating won't last. Even glass is sawn with copper discs coated with diamond, and I have seen reinforced concrete bored by a steel tube coated with diamond. Diamond is the hardest substance known to man and will cut through anything else, so provided it is firmly attached to the substrate there is no reason for it to wear out.
Cliff.
Reply to
Cliff Coggin
Just because a material is harder than one which it is cutting doesn't mean it won't wear out. HSS lathe tools are harder than non heat treated steel but still wears out and blunts when cutting it. Carbide tooling is harder than most things but still wears out and blunts. Diamond is harder than everything but still wears out and blunts. -- Dave Baker
Reply to
Dave Baker
I have diamond cutoff wheel available 5pcs w/mandrel $8.00 you have to shipping to the UK sorry
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Reply to
topgun600
It seems to be a day for spammers. First the a Chinese trying to sell us carbide tools, now this Yank flogging cutting discs that were probably made in China anyway. They are all on my blocked senders list now.
Cliff Coggin.
Reply to
Cliff Coggin
...and if the others I have come across are anything to go by, not capable of cutting anthing harder than soft cheese.
Regards, Tony
Reply to
Tony Jeffree
Aahh, the inevitable yuppie goats cheese, no one ever says though whether it comes from the nanny goat or billy goat, have you noticed ?
John S.
Reply to
John S
I suspect goat's cheese (of either variety) would be too strong for those cutting discs...
Regards, Tony
Reply to
Tony Jeffree

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