Electrical power requirement question

Considering getting a VMC but need to check I have the power to run it. As I'm no electrician, I am trying to understand what the text I pasted below
means
electrics - voltage/frequency 380 / 50 V/Hz main drive DC 20 kW spindle drive 15 kW
How many Horses ? How many amps supply do I need ?
My now scrapped Auto lathe had a big beast of a motor on it, the plate says 5.5/5.5/3,?? forgot the last bit. I think it was a 7.5 horse 2 speed motor, but I cant seem to grasp the KW - horsepower confidently. I also understand this is spread across 3 phases ? Advice welcome. Bob
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On Fri, 24 Feb 2012 22:13:55 -0000, "Emimec"

1 HP is approx 3/4 of a KW. So your 20KW is about 26 horses...and would be a major space-heater. I suspect you have lost a decimal point somewhere.
Regards, Tony
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wrote:

Thanks I pasted the info as supplied from the seller. Must admit, sounded a lot to me as well !! The "DC" bit worries me. I think I'll have to get the info again from him and hope there is a mistake in the original. In the meantime, maybe someone on here has Bridgeport 460 or similar and they could suggest what the power for that is ? Bob
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"Emimec" wrote in message wrote:

The DC will undoubtedly be internally generated within the machine control, and is quoted as a description of the type of drive, however it still is power that you have to supply. What you need is what the rating plate on the machine quotes as AC power input.
This post quotes the spindle as 2.2 kw:
http://www.cnczone.com/forums/product_announcements_manufacturer_news/136457-sharpecnc_vmc420_4axis.html
Regards,
AWEM
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wrote:

http://www.cnczone.com/forums/product_announcements_manufacturer_news/136457-sharpecnc_vmc420_4axis.html
Many thanks all Seems the most reliable way is once again to see for myself, and follow advice given here, and get the info from the machine maunufactures plate. I did request this from the seller, but he seems to be confused along the line somewhere.
To answer one question about the motor I mentioned that was 5.5/5.5/3 XX It is a Brook Crompton 2 speed beastie, powered my now scrapped, 2 inch capacity EMI-MEC auto lathe, but is still sitting on the floor, as its very heavy, and cant decide if its to be sold or go to the scrappy Bob>
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On 24/02/2012 22:13, Emimec wrote:

Power is 746W/horsepower, plus about 15% losses to be sure. Sounds like some exotic motor with a plate like that. Is it a normal induction motor?
Rob.
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On 25/02/2012 09:56, news.plus.net wrote:

Sorry did auto pilot response.....embarrassing.
Rob.
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Den 25-02-2012 10:56, news.plus.net skrev:

I whished that was the whole truth. In USA it is correct but where I live (Denmark) it is not. Here it is 736W/horsepower. Not a great difference but enough to add some confusion. AFIK the 736 goes for Europe and the 746 goes for USA and whatever more countries, I do not know.
--
Uffe Brentsen

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Uffe Brentsen wrote:

Actually what you're referring to would correctly be Pferdestarke, abbreviated PS, and often referred to as metric horsepower. Car ads in the UK usually have it mentioned in the small print somewhere indicating the figures are PS rather than hp but for most purposes the 1.3% difference doesn't matter and in kW we should all know that's unambiguous and can convert to whatever else we like. /
/
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Interesting. According to the Oxford Dictionary of Weights and measures, the term horsepower was coined by James Watt as part of the marketing of his steam engines. Its value in the UK settled down to be defined as 550 ft.lb.s^-1, which converts to 745.699872 W. Continental Europe seems to have decided on a metric version, defined as 75 kgf.m.s^-1, which is 735.499 W. The USA seems to dislike untidy numbers, so they appear to define it as 746 W, though I can't find definitive proof of this.
Since the UK invented the term, I claim we should take priority, though I'm quite happy to use 746 W in everyday use :-)
David
--
David Littlewood

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"David Littlewood" wrote in message writes

Well it rather depends if you're talking Clydesdales weighing in at a tad short of a ton, or a New Forest Pony. I've had a Clydesdale step on my foot so I know they're genuine heavy horses worthy of generating a one horsepower grunt, whereas the New Forest Pony is regarded by the French as suitable for a mid day snack!
AWEM
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