Flaring 22mm pipe

I need to put single lip flares on the end of several lengths of 22mm
pipe. All the pipe flaring kits I've seen only go up to 5/8"
(exception being RDG with one up to 3/4") however no one seems to
stock a flaring tool in metric sizes above 16mm.
Anyone know of a source?
Am I right assuming that the 'gripper bar' that holds the pipe on
these tools has serations to improve the friction and stop it being
pushed through - if that wasn't the case I suppose I could bore one
out to 22mm ?
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
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Bore the holder out to ??? tap 7/8" x something then bore out to 22mm. The 7/8" is slightly bigger so will leave gripper groves.
Failing that, just realised why not turn the grippers in when boring out ???? -- Regards,
John Stevenson Nottingham, England.
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Reply to
John Stevenson
Good point John !
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
Isn't 22mm standard plumbing tube? There must be a proper flaring kit available - have a look in a plumbers merchants. I've got a pipe flaring kit with the gripper bits mentioned and it's not too great, to be honest - Clarke item
Reply to
Robin
Robin,
Although 22mm is a standard plumbing size, flared end joints are not a standard way of joining plumbing pipe. Rottenburger do do a kit at about £500 ! Big jump up in price from the 20-30 quid of the Clarke / RDG ones. I've ordered an RDG one and will try and modify it.
The piece I'm working to uses flared joints as the pipe is carrying 75 psi pressurised coolant and several thousand amps, so cannot use sealing washers. Depending how well the RDG tool works I may end up modifying the original equipment and experiment with soft annealed copper washers.
Amusingly this is a French piece of equipment but all the pipe threads are BSP.
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
I've got a refrigeration flaring tool and gauges downstairs in the workshop, but I think it is not as large as you need. I'll have a peek later.
I think there are also a couple of canisters of ICI Freon 12 still there from the 1960's....
Peter -- Peter & Rita Forbes Email: snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk Web:
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Reply to
Peter A Forbes
threads
Peter,
Thanks for that. Don't tell too many people about the freon - the 'naughty but useful chemical police' will be after you !
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
I`m not believing you guys are all to young to remember the Securex copper pipe fittings.Hold the pipe in one hand and hammer the drift in with the other.Good for a 100 psi.All you had to remember was to put the nut on the pipe first. regards,Mark.
Reply to
mark
How strong is a normal plumbing solder joint? If you aren't using copper pipe (which you never said you were) then might not be an option, but I would have thought a properly soldered fitting would hold a bit - not really able to quantify how much pressure 75psi is so be honest. I've used a hammer type flare on 22mm plumbing tube before with good results
Reply to
Robin
Securex
drift in
Robin,
The pressure of 75 PSI is not a problem. I'm going to either braze or silver solder the joints in the pipe runs, not for pressure reasons but for current carrying capability. The actual issue is a tad more complex - isn't it always. I am having to work to a piece of French equipment that was originally piped in 18mm copper pipe using simple flared joints terminating on 3/4" BSP brass male studs that have the male cone on their ends. 18mm isn't of course a common copper pipe size here, and a simple flare on 22mm ends up too large, so has to be a 'double flare' whereby the pipe is initially swaged in on itself forming a lip of double wall, which is then flared outwards to size. Fun eh !
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
What about sawing the flared part off and using a 3/4" BSP female to 22mm copper pipe fitting.For that matter a 3/4" BSP straight coupling would screw over the top of the cone and fit the steel to copper fitting into that.That would give you tapered threads all round. Mark.
Reply to
mark
Seeing as you are silver soldering the whole shebang, just turn up some ferrules with the right size cone / flare / inside leg and SS this onto the pipe -- Regards,
John Stevenson Nottingham, England.
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Reply to
John Stevenson
reasons
French
simple
coupling
Mark,
Yes that's exactly what I'd do if I could! However the four 3/4" studs are part of a complex assembly that is all brazed together and virtually impossible to remove to work on. There is a maze of thick copper buss bars behind them and integral with them with copper pipe brazed to them with coolant flowing though. I estimate that the whole beast has something approaching 80 or so linking neoprene pipes secured (or not!) with the French equivalent of Jubilee clips at each end in positions that would require a miniature acrobat to access ! Each semiconductor is mounted on a copper plate with coolant flowing through a pipe brazed to it, and each run of pipe has a pressure sensor (with two Jubilee clips!) fitted. As I speak I have blanked off the inputs and outputs and am doing a leak down test having pressurised it to 80 psi with air (top working pressure being 5 bar or about 75 psi). So far found and cured 3 leaks and it has held up for 5 hours (so far!). Don't fancy a water leak when it is running as there is a 500 V DC buss bar at 200 amps. You can be certain I will be earthing this beast VERY well
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
braze or
reasons
French
itself
coupling
John,
That if I may say so, is another example of a John Stevenson flash of genius ! Dead obvious when someone points it out. I doff my cap to you
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
Don't fancy a water leak when it is running as there is a 500 V DC buss bar at 200 amps. You can be certain I will be
Have you got enough water down there to cause a leak?(BG)
Mark.
Reply to
mark

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