Clausing drill press followup

I went ahead and grabbed the Clausing 15" drill press. It's an olive green
16VT-1 series one with the variable speed belt contraption, and goes from
500 to 4000 RPM as it's the fast version. Serial numbers and styling
indicate it's from between 1962 and 1965. The motor appears to be
original, 3/4hp 3 phase and works fine. One grease gun style oil fill port
is missing, can easily replace that though. Everything spins up, and
there's no horrible sounds, although it does sound like a big fast machine
at the highest speed setting. It came with a fixer-upper Albrecht 130
chuck from some other machine.
Somebody went to town trying to remove the arbor from this chuck, complete
with a vise, what might be an angle grinder or file and other prying
tools. The jaws and shell seem OK. I tried to pound out the arbor with no
luck. I finally drilled into it with a 1/8 drill bit, then 5/16ths then
3/8ths by hand to try to push it out with a punch. Somehow that got stuck
in the hole and I had to cut the arbor off to get the punch out. I'll try
to thread the hole and pop the stub of the arbor out with a bolt and stack
of washers. The arbor is a super old looking and real Morse, that doesn't
appear to be hardened at all, anywhere, considering I was able to hand
drill into it as well as cut it off with a hacksaw. Was this normal back
in the day?
As for the bent spindle, the last owner did something and it appears to
run true at this point. It's a done deal now, so we'll see if there are
any surprises when I take the quill out to look at the spindle itself.
This it is my first "large" machine that weighs more than I do.
Reply to
Cydrome Leader
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The space I'm moving into has 3 phase power. The test run was with alligator clips into a disconnect box on the wall. I will have to run 3 phase over to "my" corner or fish out the strange wiring that's in place now and retrofit.
Reply to
Cydrome Leader
The condition of the arbor was too poor to use wedges or any type of prying tool anymore. I really can't determine what the last person was even trying to really do from all the marks and worn off sections. The end chuck body itself was pretty chewed up. I'm going to use a 7/16-14 tap (it fits the slighly oversized 3/8 hole) and bolt to try to pull the JT33 stub of the arbor out. If I can locate my coping saw I might just try to cut into the shell of the arbor to relieve the tension a bit. I'm still surprised at how soft the old Morse arbor really is.
Reply to
Cydrome Leader
Cydrome Leader fired this volley in news:md7q0q $1ls$ snipped-for-privacy@reader1.panix.com:
Since it's only used in force in one direction, and because MT arbors sometimes seem to just 'fall out' without much provocation, I would presume that a soft arbor in a hardened socket would hold better.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Its ashame that its sometimes tough to go by the previous occupants' prints.
Reply to
mogulah
I don't know the story on this, but I read (30 years ago) that Morse taper tool holders are (always? sometimes?) supplied soft. Then there was something about heat-treating them.
I wish I remembered more, but that much I recall.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
Ed Huntress fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
I don't know how you'd successfully harden them without also having to re- grind them. They'd change dimensions, one way or another.
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Ya' got me, Lloyd. Maybe it's worth looking up -- for someone else.
I'm busy trying to figure out which metals can be used in laser-melt additive manufacturing. Did you know that the martensite in maraging steel is actually FeNi, and that, unlike iron-carbon martensite, it doesn't distort when heated and quenched?
I learned something new today.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
Was there a change in arbor technology at some point? All the new arbors I see listed brag about hardenened or even fully hardened- I don't see any unhardenened ones for sale anywhere. The generic and even Rohm MT2 to JT33 ones are only $8 with the Jacobs ones at about $22.
If unhardened steel is really fine, I'd be tempted to make my own arbor. The JT33 side could be turned from a shaft and mounted in the chuck body. The Albrecht chuck body does fit in Sherline lathe and from there the morse 2 taper could be turned. In theory it would be as straight and concentric as you could get as long as the arbor isn't removed from the chuck.
Reply to
Cydrome Leader
Ed Huntress fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
Did you hear of the new iron-aluminum alloy the Koreans have finally succeeded at making? They figured a way to distribute the B2 crystals that normally render the alloy brittle... makes it as strong as ferro-titanium alloys at 36% less weight than plain steel.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Cydrome Leader fired this volley in news:md801o$dt8$ snipped-for-privacy@reader1.panix.com:
You gonna turn accurate tapers on a Sherline? Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
"Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" fired this volley in news:XnsA453B0AD019ABlloydspmindspringcom@216.168.4.170:
What I mean was... do you have the CNC version? If not, how would you approach cutting that taper with the work _chucked_?
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Yeah, I saw the story in The Economist and I read the paper. It really is exciting:
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We'll see what happens with it. Some of the exotic precipitation-hardening alloys that come out of the labs are not practical to make in commercial quantitites.
But, maybe....
Reply to
Ed Huntress
How does your Sherline do with the tailstock set over that far? I'd think you were pushing it, unless you have a very good taper attachment.
Here's a soft, blank Morse taper arbor:
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Reply to
Ed Huntress
If he's not aware of it, he needs a faceplate dog made to slide smoothly on a drive pin mounted in the faceplate. But I don't think he'll have much luck with it.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
Test your idea on a tapered arbor with a dial indicator in the toolpost. It ain't easy.
I have similar sizes of Albrecht and Jacobs Ball-Bearing chucks, and prefer the Jacobs.
-jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I checked the docs on the their compound slide and yeah, it doesn't have enough travel to cut a taper 2-1/2" long. boo. The head can be offset, but the tailstock can't move with it, so turning with one center isn't possible at weird angles. The old timers on youtube always do a final tuning and fit with a sharpie to make sure the fit is good.
Reply to
Cydrome Leader
I would buy an arbor for the Clausing DP. That said, an unhardened arbor w ill work just fine. And you can make one. I made an arbor for a Jacobs sm all ball bearing chuck for use in my lathe. It is a bit longer than what y ou can buy. You can make the taper by cutting two diameters separated by t he right amount. Then just remove most of what needs to be removed with th e lathe. And then use a file while the piece is turning. Use some blue an d check it with the chuck to see where it is touching and then use the file some more. It isn't a fast way to do it, but it can be done. Do it betwe en centers.
Dan
Reply to
dcaster
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Or -- if you have one of the Harbor Freight hydraulic presses, you can unscrew the pusher-platform for the jaws (you already have the shell off and the jaws out, don't you?), and find a pushrod which will go through the threaded body, ideally with a sleeve of aluminum, so you don't press against the sides of the threads with the steel of the rod if it bends, and just pump until it pops out. Be sure to have something like a box with crumpled newspaper below it to catch the arbor stub, so it does not go bouncing around the ship, or into you.
You'll probably have to do the drill and tap to give something for the rod to push against, since you cut off the bottom to give access for driving out the push rod which got stuck.
If there is enough shoulder for the fork to work against. To start with, the special Jacobs fork pairs (two thin wedges) for popping out arbors would have been a better choice. I've got all four sizes ready for various needs, but sometimes the arbor body it too close to the Jacobs taper diameter for one of those to work.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
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As I read it above, he is trying to get the arbor (remains) out of the chuck, not the spindle.
He will probably find that quite useful, once he has the stub out of the chuck,
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols

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