old delta drill press dp 400


PIcked it up at an estate sale for 35bucks. Came with a like new vise,
planer head, circle cutter & some cheapo saftey router bits + they
through in a wilton adjustable ball thingie that I've already mounted
on a plates to hold work whilst polishing. The machine is in nice
shape, no rust- runs good. The keyless chuck seems to run out slightly
though. Looks like its on a M/T? How do you pop those off? Pickle
spreader?
I want to make sure its not threaded before I start hammering
I cant seem to find anything on DP 400. By what OWWM.com has, its from
the 40's. It looks just like DP220's only smaller. About 5 1/2 in
swing. Must have not been that popular being so small?
I found Delta/Rockwell did make a newer DP 400 though.
Anyone know anything about this model?
Thanks
Gil
Reply to
cncmillgil
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It appears to have a morse taper in the spindle. The parts breakdown below shows the situation. You will need a morse taper wedge to pop the arbor out. These wedges are common as dirt.
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Joseph Gwinn
thanks, but that link is for the "new" DP400. looking at the patent label, they are from the 30s! Whats a good rust preventive to coat the unpainted surfaces?
Gil
Reply to
cncmillgil
Ahh. Are there patent numbers mentioned? If so, look them up, as the patent drawings are often quite informative.
I assume that you mean for use, versus for storage. I use ordinary way oil. Lanolin also works well.
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Joseph Gwinn
Assuming that this is the same as your older one. Look in the quill (part 72 in the exploded drawing) for the slot which the key is pointing to. If you find it, rotate the chuck by hand to look for the matching slot in the spindle (part 74 in the same drawing) and line them up. Then place the wedge shaped Morse key (if you have it -- otherwise make one) in there so it presses on the top of the slot in the spindle and against the top end of the arbor (part 75) and tap it while holding something the chuck with the other hand -- or put something softer than metal (e.g. a pine 2x4) under it and move the table up so it can only drop about 1/2" or so when it comes free.
Once you have that out, you then use the pair of pickle forks for the specific Jacobs taper which holds the arbor in the chuck to separate those parts. Then re-insert the arbor and check it for runout. If it has runout, it has probably been bent and should be replaced. If not, the runout is in the chuck.
It looks to be a Morse Taper 2 arbor -- and whatever Jacobs taper is on the other end is a function of what that specific chuck needs. The one illustrated (the "info" link does not bother saying either what the Morse taper is or the Jacobs taper -- but looking at the photo I think that you won't be able to use the pickle forks on this particular combination -- at least without drilling a cross hole for a pin and destroying the arbor.
Somewhere near the bottom of the drawing are two hex keys, which show up as being metric -- so this is probably one of the Chinese or Taiwanese made ones not too different from what I have (without the brand name, however. :-)
Which kind of keyless chuck? An Albrecht should be very precise. Some early designs of keyless chucks are terrible -- the kind which used to be on hand held electric drills, or on eggbeater drills. (Do they still make those things?)
And another consideration -- are you sure that it is runout, and not simply that the quill is loose in the headstock casting? These don't have a clamp to hold the quill extended -- which can also be used to reduce free play, so they can be rather loose.
Good Luck, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
O.K. Very different, with the same model number. :-)
Can you take some closeups of the bottom end of the quill with the drill chuck and either put it on a web site and post links to it, or post it to the dropbox
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with a matching explanatory ".txt" file, and then post the URL and the filenames here? Maybe we can figure it out from the photos.
Vactra No. 2 if you have it. (Lathe and mill Waylube.)
WD-40 is useless long term.
Maybe chainsaw bar/chain oil -- I've heard that it is as tacky as Vactra No. 2.
Good Luck, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
564 > =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 (too) near Washington D.C. |
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> =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0--- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero =
Reply to
cncmillgil
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Most drill presses have both a MT (in the spindle) and a JT (at the chuck end of the arbor), so both at the same time are possible.
However -- this looks very much like one which I saw at a hamfest which had a Jacobs taper machined directly onto the end of the spindle.
Except that the weight listed in the auction (about 100 lbs) is much heavier than what I saw at the hamfest.
Does the chuck look like the one shown in the last photo in the auction you pointed to below? If so -- runout is a way of life with those. The jaws are spaced by compression springs in holes drilled in the meeting faces of the jaws. It does not take long before one of the springs gets warped, and forces two jaws farther apart, leaving an off-center grip for the drill bit.
Also -- some of that sort are tightened by screwing onto a threaded shaft -- but you could tell that by adjusting the chuck to maximum size. If you don't see threads above the chuck body, it is likely a Jacobs taper -- and the pickle fork pairs are called into service.
Anyway -- the suggestion of a loose qull in the headstock is eliminated by the photos here -- this has the split headstock with the clamp bolt to lock the quill at a given extension.
What color is yours? Black was common for a *long* time.
Or is it possible that yours was repainted? Check around the edges of the badge on the front belt guard for traces of paint applied after the badge was installed.
Sometimes, shops painted all of their tools the same color for whatever reason.
Maybe. The motor shown here is a 1/3 HP one as well. Pity that the serial number is partially covered with grease, so you can't compare them, assuming they are the same maker and model number. The one shown is certainly an old one.
Good Luck, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
I saw one of these at a used tool place. If I recall, the spindle ended in a JT33 taper. If so, or any of the Jacobs tapers, the Jacobs pickle forks will work
Joe Gwinn
Reply to
Joseph Gwinn
564 > =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 (too) near Washington D.C. |
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> =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0--- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero =
Reply to
cncmillgil
The really OLD Deltas had a splined adapter. They had various adapters depending on what the custormer wanted, even a MT socket that stuck out a mile. Usually supplied with a JT taper for chucks. A snap ring at the bottom of the spindle retained the adapter. You remove chucks from the JT using special forked wedges, MSC used to carry them. Used in pairs. This was with the floor-sized machines, I've no idea what your particular model has. Probably a JT33 machined on the spindle stub.
Stan
Reply to
stans4
-4564
Ok I'm bored & in clean & restore old iron mode. Whats a good brand of machine enamel for the Delta (gray) Someone spilled paint all over the base(painted areas only) prolly 20-30 years ago. I will meada blast it down to bear & repaint only sliding table & base. The head is original & nice - only a saw - dusting & cleaning needed. have to check out H/F for a JT pickel forks for chuck removal.
Reply to
cncmillgil
personally, I use Imron for painting machinery, it is very rugged and resistant to solvents, coolant, and abrasion. There is a thread on paint on the OWWM site that you may find helpful
Reply to
Bill Noble
Any clue what the OWWM site happens to be? A full URL? What it means? (I guess that I could do a Google search, but it probably matches more than one thing.)
Not that it matters to me -- I didn't ask the question.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
On 25 Jul 2010 01:30:58 GMT, "DoN. Nichols" wrote the following:
I used Homey's Despot brand of alkyd paint for Dina (my old tablesaur) and it has held up well for a decade. I think it was $7/qt.
Type "owwm" in the browser window and it magically brings up "
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", Don. _Amazing_, huh?
When in doubt or curiosity, try the simplest thing first, even if you didn't ask the question and it doesn't matter much.
-- It is pretty hard to tell what does bring happiness; poverty and wealth have both failed. -- Kin Hubbard
Reply to
Larry Jaques
is runout, and
l. =A0Pity that
38-4564
ero ---
Good luck with HF, have seen a few oddball things there, but not those wedges. Here's the MSC catalog page, upper right:
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*LTIP They're wedges, NOT an automotive pickle fork.
Stan
Reply to
stans4
[ ... ]
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*LTIP>
They do seem to be referred to as pickle forks anyway. :-)
And they *are* forked to pass either side of the taper.
Note that there are four different sets (IIRC) for different sizes of Jacobs taper -- and some tapers require one fork from each of two different sets. So -- until you know what the taper is, you may or may not be able to figure out which set you need.
Good Luck, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
The DP400 is / was the most common small drill press sold for a VERY long time. It's actually made by Rexon in Taiwan - or at least was towards the end of it's run.
It's often sold (The Rexon) by other manufacturers. Here are some mades and models that are the same exact design at one point or another:
DAYTON 3Z917E, 3Z918, 3Z918F, 3Z993, 5Z146 GRAINGER 3Z917E, 3Z918, 3Z918F, 3Z993, 5Z146 DELTA DP400, 17-900, 17-901, 17-950L, 17-959 GRIZZLY G7943 & G7944 JET JDP-17MF PALMGREN 80153, 80154
As you can see, the 17-900 and other 17-XXXx units replaced the DP400.
If you want a technical drawing of it's Morse Taper #2 quill, etc, I'll be glad to send it to you in DWG or PDF format. Just e-mail me directly or post here and hope I catch it.
Everything above is pseudo-correct. I've not actually put any of these machines side-by-side with the DP400 to compare them, but when the quill and other measurements are exactly the same and when I was able to track down Rexon as the manufacturer for two or three brands, then all the pieces started to fit together in my mind and this is what I came up with.
I'm sure enough of my data that when someone comes to me with any of the otehr brands listed above, I simply send them a DP400 compatible multiple spindle head and adapter and sleep well at night knowing it will work just fine.
...Of course, I just read the threads after your initial one (after typing the stuff above) and realize that it's an antique model that is different than the one I know so all of what I wrote above is useless to this particular item but possibly useful to otehrs here so it remains intact and transmitted.
...And if it matters, I call the tool that removes a Morse Taper loaded tool (via the slot) a Drift or Drift Key and the one used on a Jacob's type taper Chuck Removal Wedges.
McMaster sells them all:
Jacob's Taper Tools: JT1 - 29225A34 $7.18 JT2 - 29225A35 $7.18 JT3 - 29225A36 $7.18 JT6, JT33 - 29225A37 $7.18
Morse Taper Tools: MT1 - 4 1/2" 2796A11 $8.04 MT2 - 5 3/4" 2796A12 $9.14 MT3 - 7 7/8" 2796A13 $9.90 MT4, MT5 - 9 1/4" 2796A24 $16.05
Those for MT6, MT7 or the super rare larger styles are generally hand made. ...At least as far as I can tell.
Regards, Joe Agro, Jr. (800) 871-5022 01.908.542.0244 Automatic / Pneumatic Drills:
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Spindle Drills:
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Tapping:
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Site:
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V8013-R
Reply to
Joe AutoDrill

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