'Forming' Tufnol strip

I need to put a permanent set (arc of a circle approx. 6..8" radius)
into some 1/16" x 5/8" Tufnol strip. The stuff can be bent quite easily
to very small radii and when released will spring back to the required
radius but it appears to have a memory and, over time, will straighten
further. I believe that heating will teach it some manners but
unfortunately I don't have enough spare to risk sacrificial experiments.
Any ideas?
The application is 'passive' (i.e. Dummy) leaves of a leaf spring
assembly. The top two leaves are tempered PB and do all the real work
the rest (Tufnol) are purely cosmetic.
Reply to
Mike H
Loading thread data ...
Genuine Tufnol is Synthetic Resin Bonded Fabric in one of a few grades, Paxolin is Synthetic resin Bonded Paper.
Both will soften with heat, our transformer bobbin guy used to heat sheets of Paxolin over a hot plate before punching to stop it shattering.
Try boiling water first and see what that gets you, if more heat is needed then either hot oil or open flame but the stuff will burn so be careful.
Tufnol are in Perry Bar, Brum and their technical guys are quite helpful.
Peter -- Peter & Rita Forbes Email: snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk Web:
formatting link
Reply to
Peter A Forbes
easily
required
straighten
experiments.
Only an Idea, but can you sneak SWMBO's iron into the garage for a bit
Thermostatcally controlled and temps from low to quite high wih minima burning risk.
Dav
-- small.plane ----------------------------------------------------------------------- small.planes's Profile:
formatting link
this thread:
formatting link
Reply to
small.planes
In message , small. planes writes
Erm! I need to iron them round rather than flat IYSWIM.
Boiling water was only marginally effective but a brief sojourn in SWMBO's oven at 115 degrees C seems to have done the trick and, hopefully, no discernible olfactory evidence remains!
Reply to
Mike H
In message , small. planes
writes
Sorry, I wasnt clear in my suggestion, I ment to heat them with th iron, and then form them around the curve afterwards, Ive had to d this recently wit some veneer I needed to steam.
minimal
:) good job it didnt catch fire... :0
Dav
-- small.plane ----------------------------------------------------------------------- small.planes's Profile:
formatting link
this thread:
formatting link
Reply to
small.planes
It is common practice when Tufnol is to machined to tight tolerances to 'cure' the workpiece first. This reduced creep or relaxation during and after machining. A temperature of 150 degC is used - but not more as this tends to reduce strength.
Reply to
Tim Christian

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.