glue

Some while ago, I used some no-more-nails type stuff to attach a metal (chromed) soap dish thing to the ceramic-tiled splashback behind the
handbasin.
it's fallen off again, although it stayed there for a while.
any recommendations for better glue for this purpose? It's got a "foot" about 40mm dia., and has to carry the weight of the dish and a bar of soap.
screwing it to the wall is not practical, since the tiles would have to be drilled, which is not easy, and the wall behind is lath-and-plaster, so screws don't guarantee to hit anything solid.
--
Austin Shackles. www.ddol-las.net my opinions are just that
Travel The Galaxy! Meet Fascinating Life Forms...
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Not sure about the glue - maybe one designed for gluing to glass would work better. Also, if you scratch the surface of the tiles the adhesion might be better.
I have found drilling tiles is fine provided that you make a good scratch at the desired point with a glass cutter (tap gently with hammer), then use a masonry drill (with hammer action switched off, obviously) until the tile is penetrated. Then one of the special thingies for attaching screws to plasterboard should work. Trouble with lath and plaster, I found, is that if you hit a lath it tends to get pushed away by the drill bit.
If all else fails, the nice holes should act as a good key for the glue...
David
--
David Littlewood

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Epoxy should do it. Sticks pretty well to glass/ceramic as well as metal. I would probably file the chrome of the back/glueing surface.
Richard
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On 16 Sep, 14:32, Austin Shackles

I would suggest EVO STICK WET GRAB might be good. It seems very strong and any excess can be cleaned off with petrol No guarantees though. Regards Alan
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Those sticky pads used for attaching rear view mirrors to car windscreens should do the trick. However last time one of those came off I used Araldite instead and that worked fine and provided a more rigid bond. You'll get a better key if you abrade the glaze on the tile and the chrome on the dish before sticking it on.
Actually it reminds me of a couple of nasty cheapo own brand air fresheners I bought from Asda when I was working away from home for a few weeks last year and staying at a colleague's house while he was abroad. They came with sticky pads attached so you could put them on tiles or glass. I stuck one in the bathroom under a glass shelf and one in the kitchen on the stainless steel cooker hood. The smell from them was awful. Far worse than that of anything I was actually buying them to mask.
I tried to get them off again and that was when the problems started. The one in the bathroom came off the glass shelf eventually although I was close to thinking the shelf was going to break before the pad had shifted and I cleaned up the excess bits of glue with a nylon scourer pad but the one stuck to the cooker hood refused to budge. I was pulling hard enough to start buckling the stainless steel and the effing thing still wouldn't shift. I didn't want to gouge at it with a knife so I worked away at it one corner at a time until finally it ripped free leaving big chunks of pad and glue on the cooker hood which similarly refused to budge.
I tried 'rolling' them off a bit at a time with a finger, scraping at them with softish things like toothbrush handles and a wooden thing I found in a kitchen drawer, I tried adding washing up liquid and every other liquid I could find under the sink but in the end the only way was to scrub away at it with a nylon scouring pad and finally with the help of that and some Jif or similar I got all the bloody stuff off. However when I stepped back and saw the results of my handiwork under the light to my horror where I'd been rubbing the scourer had turned the uniform and previously faultless brushed matt satin finish of the stainless steel cooker hood into a shiny polished patch which glared balefully back at me like a winking eye.
God knows how much it would have cost to replace the cooker hood so I had to mask the damage somehow. I tried roughing that bit back up again with a new scouring pad which helped a bit but not enough. I contemplated sandpaper but figured I stood more chance of ruining the thing completely. In the end I got a chair out so I could reach all of the hood and spent the whole night working away at every side of it with the scourer until I'd turned the whole bloody thing into a more shiny version of its previous self that the polished patch blended into. As dawn finally broke I stepped off the chair exhausted but unless you knew what had happened and exactly where to look the damage was near as dammit invisible.
That's the last time I ever use anything with a sticky pad attached to it and also the last time I use nylon scouring pads on metal which apparently they are much tougher than. So if you can find a couple of own brand Asda air fresheners and utilise the sticky pads on them I think you'll be able to glue your soap dish to the wall in such a way it'll never move again.
When the guy got back from abroad he actually sold the house a few weeks later without me hearing anything about it so it seems I got away with it. It's not a night I want to remember though.
--
Dave Baker



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Dave Baker wrote:

But apparently Araldite on car windscreens is too tough and because of differential expansion can cause cracks to start, (or so I read somewhere).
Russell
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You'll hate me for saying this, but 20 minutes with acetone would have shifted the stuff without leaving a mark. Bet you don't tell your wife you are an expert at cleaning cookers <g>
Cliff Coggin.
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Hi All
I wanted some acetone to soften a rectangular PVC conduit (50mm x 200mm) before using normal solvent weld to seal in a plug at one end. In the US it seems you use a purple coloured primer (acetone and MEK) but I couldn't find it anywhere here in the UK. Our solvent weld pipes are of a softer or pre softened PVC, but the conduit PVC won't take solvent weld very well.
I eventually bought 0.25L of pure(ish) acetone from a beauty supplies place - Sally's, I think. Apparently its used to remove false finger nails - the finger tips are immersed in the acetone for 15 min and then the nails are peeled off. H&S minded people should all suck through their teeth at this thought.
Softening the conduit with the acetone worked a treat and I now have a tall slim coolant tank that fits neatly along side the lathe stand, tucked behind the front leg.
I've since found acetone to be the most wonderful substance ever. It shifts all sorts of stubborn glues and marks, permanent marker pens, names and addresses on poly bags (ME and MEW etc) that can't go through the shredder.
Returning to the original topic, I used impact adhesive to fix up a small plastic hook to hold the end of the shower curtain to prevent splashes sneaking around the end and onto the carpet. Its been in place for at least 10yrs.
cheers
Toby
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You can also get it from model aeroplane shops like SMC <http://www.sussex-model-centre.co.uk . Fibretech also sell it but it doesn't seem to be listed on their website <http://www.fibretechgb.co.uk .
Hth,
--
Boo

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In article

In my lab days we used to use the stuff by the gallon for cleaning glassware - it is an excellent solvent for most organic chemicals. In those days (early 1970s) we used to chuck it down the sink, which would probably get you time in chokey these days.
David
--
David Littlewood

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David Littlewood wrote:

That takes me back :)
Also good for drying glassware quickly, though you weren't really supposed to use it for that.
-- Peter Fairbrother
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But it worked a treat didn't it? Wash with water, squirt acetone over the lot, and shove it all in the drying oven for 20 minutes.
Cliff.
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Cliff Coggin wrote:

Oh that works too, but it's not what I meant. Shake excess water off, rinse with a good slosh of acetone, chuck the acetone down the sink - and wait ten seconds for the remaining acetone, with most of the remaining water, to evaporate.
20 seconds to dry glassware, rather than 20 minutes, For when you are in a real hurry. :)
-- Peter Fairbrother
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Not really practical for the job your doing, but a can of Polycell expanding foam must the stickiest substance I've ever come across. I've stuck windowsills to brickwork, doorframes to walls etc. Also sticks to fingers pretty good. Bob
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wrote:

    I've been equally successful in gluing a heavy three-container shower gel dispenser to a tiled wall with common old silicone from a tube....and that was at least fifteen years ago. It's hasn't moved, and neither have we :)
--
Chris Edwards (in deepest Dorset) "....there *must* be an easier way!"

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On Tue, 16 Sep 2008 20:51:59 +0100, "Emimec"

I agree - I've used the stuff in all manner of applications after noting how infernally sticky it is. I glued a fibreglass bumper on a car with the stuff after the mounts rotted off. It's still on, several years later.
You can buy a low expansion version of the foam - and I'd recommend a trial run with a couple of bits of wood to see exactly how much you'd need before it starts to ooze out of the joint.
Regards,
--
Stephen Howard - Woodwind repairs & period restorations
http://www.shwoodwind.co.uk
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Stephen Howard wrote:

Aaarggh. Don't mention that stuff in my presence.
Got some on my (signed) John Lennon T-shirt, and it's never come off. Doesn't get washed or worn much, but !!!
(and even messed up, you'll get it over my cold dead body; and those of my heirs too, if the bickering is anything to go by. Though they seem more interested in my Google T-shirt right now, but I don't think that will last)
Austin might use a urethane glue, maybe Gorilla glue though I've never used it, or car windscreen glue (the type that comes in sealant cartridges and is used to hold the glass in place, not the tiny tubes which are use for car mirrors - but some need a primer too).
However the latter especially may be overkill for one soap dish.
-- Peter Fairbrother
(but remember rule 37: "There is no 'Overkill.' There is only 'Open Fire' and 'Time To Reload.'")
(I'm unsure whether the last phrase should be hyphenated - but it's written without)
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On Sep 16, 2:32 pm, Austin Shackles

Hello Austin have you been into B & Q lately because they have a range of wire mesh type bathroom soap dishes that you hold up by two suction pads that are about 40 mm Dia they are designed to attach with the suckers then screw a cap on that tightens it up, I have tried one of these units in my shower cubicle in my caravan as I didn't want to drill any holes and they hold up very well with a Bottle of shower gell and Shampoo. Well worth a look at Cheers Colin
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On Tue, 16 Sep 2008 14:32:49 +0100, Austin Shackles

One of the most effective adhesives I know for attaching stuff to tiling is silicone bath sealant. I used it to attach the metal frame of a shower cubicle to the tiling & the only way to remove it when I came to replace the shower was by cutting through the joint.
You would have to support it in place while the sealant cures, but should work a treat.
Regards, Tony
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Austin Shackles wrote:

Aquarium silicone. People use it to hold fishtanks together, and there's a whole lot of weight of water in one of those. Ordinary acetic (the type which smells strongly of vinegar) silicone sealant will probably do, but aquarium silicone is better, and not much more expensive.
Maybe stick it on the cross junction between four tiles, after removing the tile grout? - but this may not be aesthetically pleasing.
-- Peter Fairbrother
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