I'm either a genius or an idiot

The piece I am making is a cylinder, about 15mm diameter but needed to have a flat down one side. I don't have an end mill to mount in the
chuck, so I bolted the cylinder sideways in the 4-jaw and used a normal cutting tool... did a reasonable job (nothing a bit of linishing won't sort out!!). Is there a better way of doing this without buying a milling machine?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That is a perfectly reasonable way to do the job.
--
Charles Lamont

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robin wrote:

You really gotta get a couple decent model engineering books and discover some of the things that you are rediscovering.
The Amateurs Lathe by Sparey is one of the best.
Workholding in the Lathe by Tubal Cain is good, and affordable, Milling Operations in the Lathe , Same author, is one I reccomend getting over a lot of others. Both are part of the "Workshop Practice Series" books. Most of that series of books contain a least a few golden tidbits of information, while some of them are simply outstanding. These two books are in the outstanding catagory,IMO, and can be got for pretty cheap in the brit neighborhood, according to amazon.co.uk.
The prices quoted there for brand new stock are about half the retail prices I pay here in Canada for these books, and if you check out the "used" listings, well sir, I figure they are asking a paltry sum for these, at 3 or 4 pound a copy.
At those prices, I recomend you get Screwcutting in the Lathe, by Martin Cleeve, as well. I don't normally recommend it at the retail prices that I have to pay over here, as it is largely padded out with screwcutting charts that are really only of use to folk with older odder lathes, but it covers the theory of screwcutting well and is a usefull addition at the prices over there.
If you feel the need to splurge, get the George Thomas books, Model Engineers Workshop Manual, and Workshop Techniques. GREAT books!
Cheers Trevor Jones
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robin wrote:

When I had to do a similar job I just plonked it in my shaper :)
kerthunk,tick,kerthunk,tick. flat sided cylinder :)
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
from "Robin" :

Given the equipment that you have available - perfectly reasonable.
With similar constraints I soon looked on eBay for a Vertical Slide which fits on the cross slide. Theses are available in both Fixed and Swivel types. Once you have one then your time will be taken up with "making fixtures to make tools, to make fixtures, to make tools, to make parts" :))
My Vertical Slide is on the cross slide as much as my quick-change tool post!
JG
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've already got the screwcutting and milling-in-the-lathe (sounds like a nice village...) books - probably should read them again.
Isn't it a "shock" to the cutting tool when the cylinder meets it - since the length of the cylinder far exceeds the diameter, the majority of the time there is air in front of the cutting tool, until the cylinder swings round to hit it... do I not risk damaging things? Standard of finish was not great as I was reluctant to increase the speed but it's close enough for what I need...
...so to answer the question, looks like I'm a genius!!!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I say get the milling machine - I did and its like chalk and cheese compared to milling on the lathe.
Tim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robin wrote:

Yes, it sounds awful but it doesn't seem to harm HSS tools. Don't try it with tipped tools though, they may be hard but they're also very brittle and chip easily with intermittent cuts.
--
Regards, Gary Wooding
(To reply by email, change feet to foot in my address)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robin wrote:

It is a shock, but nothing compared with running the saddle into the chuck jaws or dropping something heavy on the bed :D As long as the tool (HSS?) is sturdy, speed is low and feed is modest, no problem. If you take too big/fast cuts the worst that could happen is the workpiece moves, or the tool tip snaps off - in which case you'll may to start again. Provided the lathe is setup right, the machine won't suffer.

Try a tool with a wide sharp edge for finishing.

Yes :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robin wrote:

Interupted cutting used to be the bane of carbide tools, though there are now carbibes built to take the shock.
It's a pretty normal thing to do, and as long as you don't get too eager on the feed, it works fine.
Cheers Trevor Jones
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Trevor Jones wrote:

I think I did chip the tool slightly, but can just index it round :) Will look at investing in some different tools - I think the scrappie down the road has hundreds just lying around which I'm sure I could pick up for next to nothing...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

scrappie
Your lucky then. The scrapies round here (not that there are many) have an animal with fangs at the gate (or it could be the owner - hard to tell) playing the "no mate can't come in, health and safety.. mor'n my jobs worth" record.
AWEM
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 31 Oct 2006 18:32:04 -0000, "Andrew Mawson"

They probably only play that record when they see you coming ;-)
Regards, Tony
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Scrappies have to be 'cultivated' , bloody hell most need it.
It's well worth it though for the gems that happen your way. Never, repeat, Never try to beat a scrappies down on price, take it as either yes or no and use the swings and roundabout routine.
What seems dear one time will seem cheap on others.
Ignore the fact that they have paid bugger all for that part or very little but work on the premise that "Is that worth that much to me ? " routine.
My best scrappie is that cultivated he drops his missus off at Asda and calls in for a coffee whilst she shopping. I've had some gems off this guy in my time.
One day he came round with a round head Colchester Student on the back. Came out of a special school where they had been making wooden pens on it ! Hardly used, coolant tank had never been filled, 4 jaw and steadies were still in wax wrapping paper. I asked him how much it had cost, answer was bugger al, they just wanted it moving. Then asked how much, answer was 250, done deal and lifted it off onto the yard, coffee gone he went on his way. Customer came round and asked if the lathe was for sale, yup 400
Done deal, loaded up and away. Next time he asked what happened to the lathe, I told him I sold it for 400. His reply ? We all have to make a living.
. -- Regards,
John Stevenson Nottingham, England.
Visit the new Model Engineering adverts page at:- http://www.homeworkshop.org.uk /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Don't assume carbide is the be-all and end-all. You can grind HSS tools and tool bits to any shape or cutting angles you need, and they will often give a finer finish. You can also make specials from scratch from silver steel. Shape it in the soft (well softish) condition, harden it, and just hone the edge on.
--
Charles Lamont

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Charles Lamont wrote:

All very well if you have a grinder. My lathe is in the lounge - I've got no room for anything else - garage is completely full...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Move it upstairs into the bedroom then. That way you can turn in your sleep.
Ok I'll get me coat............................................
. -- Regards,
John Stevenson Nottingham, England.
Visit the new Model Engineering adverts page at:- http://www.homeworkshop.org.uk /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John,
I always look forward to reading your posts. Some are very detailed and informative, some give a different view on problems which no one else has thought of and some like this, just crack me up. Keep it up.
Archie
">>

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 01 Nov 2006 13:27:18 GMT, John Stevenson

LOL Having seen JohnS' workshop and front room, wouldn't surprise me in the least if the bedroom has overflow. Have you finished decorating the front room yet John?
GeoffH (The Pirate) Norfolk - UK not VA
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 01 Nov 2006 17:52:15 +0000, gch <halgate> wrote:

Front room ?
Oh you mean the Ebay dispatch office ? -- Regards,
John Stevenson Nottingham, England.
Visit the new Model Engineering adverts page at:- http://www.homeworkshop.org.uk /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.