Indexable parting tools

Anyone tried the Glanze parting tools from Chronos?
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item 21.
The other option for a small lathe seems to be the Q-cut from Greenwood,
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but that's more than twice the price at £50 :(
Any recommendations, other suggestions?
Ta.
BTW, I just had to make a complex part from Inconel, and as I only have
one bit of stock the right size I decided to make a test piece from ally
first. Wow! It was so easy .. 0.01 mm? peasy, go for a micron .. I'd
forgotten what machining ally and even mild steel is like after
struggling with stainless, copper and superalloys all the time.
-- Peter Fairbrother
Reply to
Peter Fairbrother
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I have the Greenwood parting tool and it works a treat. Not seen/used the Glanze but just looking at the pic on the website, I don't think it will give the same depth of cut as the Greenwood (which is basically a piece of steel plate that is thinner than the cut width of the tip). Mine is good for 20mm cut depth.
Regards, Tony
Reply to
Tony Jeffree
If you are planning to trek up to Harrogate, See is Jenny has got anything suitable. ISTR I got my first insert parting tool from her. Later additions were vie Ebay. Things like this:-
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regards Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
I have been mulling over an indexable tip parting tool for some time. I am currently considering a Hertel blade from J&L currently on offer at £32.95 +VAT. The Holder I will make (hopefully). The advantage is capacity. The Chronos looks to be about 32mm OD max the Greenwood is 42mm the Hertel is 76mm (if you pick the 2.2mm x 26mm deep blade. It is also machined for a blade at both ends. Useful should you damage an end.
One small note. Hertel suggest that the tip should be 0.1mm above centre line for cutoff in solid bar stock. Not sure if the same for Greenwood or Glanze.
Reply to
Richard Edwards
On Mon, 21 Apr 2008 20:21:23 +0100, Mark Rand garbled:
Sorry about the spelling, Blood sugar must have been a bit low before teatime...
IF Jenny VIA Ebay
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
And the grammar isn't too great either. Should read Blood Alcohol -- Regards,
John Stevenson Nottingham, England.
Visit the new Model Engineering adverts page at:-
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Reply to
John Stevenson
Worth taking a glanze at the instructions then....
I'll get my coat...
Regards, Tony
Reply to
Tony Jeffree
No, that's now, not earlier on in the evening.
In between was spent wasting the children's inheritance on a couple of oil seals and an hundred 5/8" bearing balls for the grinder (it needs 52, but with 100, I can select for size)
Mark Rand (in vino veritas, or something like that) RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
In article , Peter Fairbrother writes
Like Tony, I have the Q-cut - bought before the Glanze one appeared. I have to say it is the best parting tool I have ever used, by a mile. Parting off is now a comparative pleasure, never needed to think about rear tool posts and all that stuff. I saw a demo at Myford last year of a guy doing it with pxf and a flood of suds, damn fast too, went through the steel like butter.
David
Reply to
David Littlewood
Agree totally with some of the other comments. Have used the Greenwood Q-Cut for years and it is brilliant. It has probably saved me a fortune in time & materials with spoilt work amd my nerves remain fairly calm! hth Mike
Reply to
MikeH_QB
Just wondering if these replaceable tip parting tools are okay for interrupted cuts such as square and hexagon bar ?
Also are they okay for parting off something that's been turned eccentric ?
Allan
Reply to
Allan Waterfall
Peter Hi,
Yet another vote here for the "Q-Cut" type of parting tool. I actually bought mine form Jenny at JB Cutting Tools here:
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It is superb and has transformed parting off for me. Although at nearly =A340 (delivered) only slightly cheaper than the Q-cut I think it was excellent value and would instantly buy the same again if necessary. You can get different thickness of blade and tip but my 2mm version handles all that I throw at it. I think that RDG also sell a similar design at a cheaper price.
One issue I have heard of (in the past not recently) was that with some of the cheaper copies the tip was not always held tightly enough in the blade and could fall out. I have had no experience of this though.
Best regards
Keith
Reply to
jontom_1uk
Keith -
That version looks like a better option than the Greenwood to me - what they have done is to cut the blade in half and attach a piece of square section steel to fit the toolpost, which limits the depth of cut to 20mm or so. With the JB version it looks like you can adjust the blade in the holder to allow deeper cuts; also, the blade is double ended so you could fit it with two different tip widths. I might have to arrange for one to follow me home from Harrogate.
Regards, Tony
Reply to
Tony Jeffree
Yes and yes.
Regards, Tony
Reply to
Tony Jeffree
Tony Hi, always happy to spend someone elses money :-)
Yes, they are adjustable to an extent but the top clamp plate is split into three areas and I haven't yet been brave enough to stick the blade out to use only the two front sections, can't see why it wouldn't work OK though.
Enjoy Harrogate; unfortunately I can't make it this year and will very much miss the trip as I think it is by far the best show in the UK.
Best regards
Keith
Reply to
jontom_1uk
snip
snip
That does look far more like a "professional" holder. Why though do advertisers not supply ALL of the information required? Typically What is the maximum diameter this unit will cut to centre What does 10mm minimum centre height actually mean? One assumes that it means a centre height equivalent to a 10mm shank tool. Surely a dimensioned drawing would be far better then one could see wether all dimensions suited ones application.
Reply to
Richard Edwards
Rear Parting Tool( sounds kinky) but that is what my GHT one is called. It is designed to part off up to 2" diameter.
I have a nice line about 4" diameter parting off from the Martin Cleeve stable.
Both 'toys' fit a Myford
Norm
Reply to
ravensworth2674
On or around Mon, 21 Apr 2008 20:27:49 +0100, Richard Edwards enlightened us thusly:
Must measure the holder I have, I only need a blade. Existing HSS blade is OK but needs frequent sharpening if it's to work at all reliably, and at that I generally get the angles wrong.
Reply to
Austin Shackles
On or around Tue, 22 Apr 2008 11:36:41 +0100, Richard Edwards enlightened us thusly:
Holder looks quite like the one I have, in which the blade can be slide back and forward. I'll have to measure the blade and see if I can get a tipped one.
Reply to
Austin Shackles

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