Reimpregnating sintered bronze bearings

I have some 50+ year old sintered bronze bearings which no longer exude much oil. They are a complicated shape, so would rather not make new ones.
Somewhere long ago I read about reimpregnating such bearings with oil under vacuum.
I seem to recall they were heated in an oven to remove the old oil and then placed in a vacuum chamber in oil and the chamber evacuated. However, I cannot find any further information e.g. times, pressures, temperatures.
There's an Edwards ED100 pump sitting in the workshop, so if I can find a few KF25 flanges I can probably make up a little chamber -- provided that this pimp provides enough vacuum (two stage pump, the manual says 10^-4 torr, but this is a pretty old specimen!)
Does anyone know where I could find any more information on the process?
Alan
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"Alan Bain" wrote in message

Examine closely the actual bearing surface under a very strong glass. The porous surface can 'smear' over time and become far less porous. This is also a potential issue when machining them, especially with small cuts which tend to rub.
Loading porous / sintered bushes with oil was always a case of putting them in a clean bean can with the appropriate oil in it, and heating to bubble point then letting soak over night. I'd imagine oil already in the bush will migrate and mix under these circumstances.
Andrew
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Andrew Mawson wrote:

With new small fan sintered bearings we used to fill with oil,blocked by finger and squeeze with thumb till the oil oozed from the sides,Not that this bit of info is probably any use.
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I've used this technique a number of times and it works very well. Once the oil coming out is clean and there are no more bubbles, you've done the job.
--
Mark Rand
RTFM

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On 22/01/16 11:25, Andrew Mawson wrote:

Don't use Hypoy...
Ford did in their MkI Concertinas, and had to replace/refurbish a *lot* of gearboxes.
It always puzzled me how I could have told them not to do it, but their engineers didn't know not to mix Oil-Lite bearings and Hypoy.
--
Rusty Hinge
To err is human. To really foul things up requires a computer and the BOFH.
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"RustyHinge" wrote in message
Don't use Hypoy...
Ford did in their MkI Concertinas, and had to replace/refurbish a *lot* of gearboxes.
It always puzzled me how I could have told them not to do it, but their engineers didn't know not to mix Oil-Lite bearings and Hypoy.
--
Rusty Hinge
To err is human. To really foul things up requires a computer and the BOFH.
  Click to see the full signature.
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On 21 Jan 2016 23:43:37 +0000 (GMT), Alan Bain

I usually just put them in hot 30 weight oil and let 'em soak overnight. I've had to a couple times clean thick old oil from the interstices of the bearing because it was clogged. I did this by putting the bearing in the hot oil and after an hour or so of the hot oil treatment and while the bearing was still in the oil pushed a close fitting rod into the bearing to force the hot oil through the bearing. This cleaned the clogs from the bearing. Then the bearings just sit in the oil until cool. Eric
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Years ago when I had to machine an Oilite bearing I talked to the technical people at Manganeze Bronze about replacing the oil that had been flung dur ing machining. They said, basically, the method Andrew suggested was the wa y to go. As they made the bearings they should know.
John H
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Thanks very much for these answers. It sounds as if heat and a bean can are the way forward!
Alan
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How about filling the 'hole' ( where the shaft runs) at one end with a rubber bung, fill with oil, close the other end with another bung, and apply G clamp. Tighten the G clamp. Repeat.
May be lightly burnish the bearing surface first, to remove/clear blocked 'pores'.
I did something similar with grease once on a roller bearing which had been flushed of grease (a long story) and it seemed to do the job.
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