dry out oil

I had to dump the trans-hydraulic oil out of a tractor today. Its contaminated with water. I've always just replaced it before, but the
price of oil has went nuts. And I'm a bit short right now.
I'm wondering about putting it in a metal bucket on a hot plate out in the field. If you heat it to say 200, will it drive the water off?
karl
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Karl Townsend wrote:

Try a small ,say cup full first. It should work. then you will need to heat the larger amout in such a way as to not catch it on fire.
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Watch out. The oil floats, and when the water reaches boiling temperature, it pops up kind of explosively and hot oil sprays around. It's really dangerous.
Yes, I have done it.
--
Ed Huntress



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Ed Huntress wrote:

If you have the time let it settle and then pour off the top. Another way would be pulling a vacuum on it and let the oil boil off at room temp. under a vacuum.
John
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john wrote:

Didja mean "let the water boil off" ?
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
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jeff_wisnia wrote:

Yup
John
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No, it will not. And no, you have not done what Karl wants to do.
i
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Ah, a challenge. <g> Ok, the single-burner Coleman is going now, under a 3-lb. steel coffee can with 1/4" of water and a half-quart of cheap motor oil...it's sounding like popcorn. POP! There it goes. 'Just sprayed oil all over the plywood scrap I use for mixing small batches of concrete.
It better not be ruined, or I'll be annoyed -- at both of us. d8-)
Try it, Iggy. Now, if you're going to say that Karl can control the temp to 200 F, my response is, good luck. But stand back.
--
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Ed Huntress wrote:

I think he is saying the water is emulsified in the oil and won't separate. But I wouldn't bet on it not separating when heated.
-jim

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If that's the case, I didn't see where Karl said that the oil was fully emulsified.
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What I am saying is that at 200-220 degrees, the water (in droplets) does not have the energy to explode. I would just heat the oil in a boiling water bath.
i
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Well, I'm not putting a meat thermometer in there, but it went off pretty damned quick. There are two sides to this but I'm not going to do the physics. One is that the oil is putting a modest pressure on the free water, and probably is raising its boiling temperature. The other is that the vapor pressure of the heated water (vapor) may not have to be that high to form a pretty violent bubble -- possibly below boiling temp at atmospheric pressure. I'll leave that question to the physics people.
But the oil apparently does put some pressure on the vapor, which is why, I'm guessing, it pops up violently when it reaches the oil's surface.
(That was my can for cleaning bicycle chains in kerosene. It better not be wrecked. <g>)
About the hydraulic oil: We may have better living through chemistry today, but when I had to deal with it, maybe 40 years ago, you had two choices. You could have anti-foaming, or you could have water-emulsifying. But you couldn't have both. The chemistries for those two features were not compatible.
So I didn't automatically assume that Karl had an emulsifying oil.
--
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On Mon, 30 May 2011 20:57:26 -0500, Ignoramus17069

At 215F at sea level water is vapour. At 210 it's just hot water. Somewhere in between there the water trapped under the oil approaches it's "local" boiling point and starts rizing to the surface - and the localized pressure reduces, causing the water to "flash" to steam. When this happens it expands exponentially - something like 1700:1 - blowing hot oil all over the place.
This is bad enough on an enclosed element - it is EXTREMELY DANGEROUS when working with an open flame, as the splashing oil can easily ignite, and the possibility of igniting the whole pot of oil, although not terribly high, IS REAL.
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wrote:

If it is "emusified" to the point it will not settle out, don't be a cheapskate - put in new oil. I'm sure the hydraulics are worth a LOT more than a couple gallons of new multi-hydraulic oil
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That's called "form oil" when it lands on your concrete-mixing plywood scrap, Ed - should be fine.
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wrote:

I was kidding Iggy. I wouldn't have put something that couldn't take the oil under my stove. But I do try to keep it off of my mixing tools.
Now I have to get rid of the mess of oil and water...
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On Mon, 30 May 2011 21:24:44 -0400, Ecnerwal

Real form oil is a mixture of the cheapest grade base oil and wool grease and stinks of sheep piss.
    Alan
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Ed Huntress Inscribed thus:

Try putting a 1 inch cube of meat on a fondue fork and plunge it into very hot oil...
The water in the meat boils and causes it to spit oil like crazy !
--
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Well, yes, I used to do that. This was a lot more violent -- a big POP! and oil sprayed a fair distance.
As I said, I've done that before. I think the last time was when I was around 20 and got the bright idea that I could dry the water out of an oil can I'd left open outdoors. I put it on my dad's new gas grill to heat it; 'wound up running off to buy some more of those lava rocks before he got home. <g>
--
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These examples have NOTHING to do with heating oil to be near the boiling point of water.
i
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