dry out oil

I had to dump the trans-hydraulic oil out of a tractor today. Its
contaminated with water. I've always just replaced it before, but the
price of oil has went nuts. And I'm a bit short right now.
I'm wondering about putting it in a metal bucket on a hot plate out in
the field. If you heat it to say 200, will it drive the water off?
karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Loading thread data ...
Try a small ,say cup full first. It should work. then you will need to heat the larger amout in such a way as to not catch it on fire.
Reply to
Ted Frater
Watch out. The oil floats, and when the water reaches boiling temperature, it pops up kind of explosively and hot oil sprays around. It's really dangerous.
Yes, I have done it.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
If you have the time let it settle and then pour off the top. Another way would be pulling a vacuum on it and let the oil boil off at room temp. under a vacuum.
John
Reply to
john
Didja mean "let the water boil off" ?
Jeff
Reply to
jeff_wisnia
No, it will not. And no, you have not done what Karl wants to do.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus17069
If the oil is milky it has additives to keep water suspended and yes the water will come out with gentle heating...been there! If you have beads of water and the oil isn't milky it will separate by standing over time.
Reply to
Tom Gardner
Certainly it will drive off the water. However, overheating may be detrimental to the oil and/or any additives. I think if I were doing it I'd try to discover what the recommended maximum operating temperature is for the oil and then hold the heat to that figure.
Cheers,
John D. Slocomb (jdslocombatgmail)
Reply to
J. D. Slocomb
Ah, a challenge. Ok, the single-burner Coleman is going now, under a 3-lb. steel coffee can with 1/4" of water and a half-quart of cheap motor oil...it's sounding like popcorn. POP! There it goes. 'Just sprayed oil all over the plywood scrap I use for mixing small batches of concrete.
It better not be ruined, or I'll be annoyed -- at both of us. d8-)
Try it, Iggy. Now, if you're going to say that Karl can control the temp to 200 F, my response is, good luck. But stand back.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
Got a vacuum pump? I doubt you have the volume to justify the sort of thing (as commercially and not cheaply built in Cortland, NY) we used on the transformer oil in the labs, but that was a vacuum-filtration system, and as such would get the water out without heat (it also ran it through filters to remove particulates at the same time - I'd suggest at least a pipe section with a bunch of super-magnets to pull any steel out of it, and perhaps a regular spin-on filter as well if you can plumb one up.)
Reply to
Ecnerwal
I think he is saying the water is emulsified in the oil and won't separate. But I wouldn't bet on it not separating when heated.
-jim
Reply to
jim
Do you want to risk an expensive transmission, hydraulic pump and control valves to salvage $50 worth of tractor UTF fluid?
Reply to
Pete C.
its a bit of both. I'll toss the bottom gallon after it sits. Then heat the milky stuff. I'll just start with 1/2 a five pail and set the hot plate on about mid range heat. Check it every 30 minutes or so. I got 20 gallons for this batch.
Thanks, everybody, for all the advice.
Karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Are you saying that you pulled a vacuum to boil off the water, or that you used a vacuum pump to suck the oil through a filter? Two pretty different processes.
Reply to
rangerssuck
A centrifuge is effective at this, if you are on a farm, a cream separator is a form of a centrifuge that may be worth a try, particularly if you have one that you don't use for cream any more.
Reply to
Bill Noble
Aside from what others have suggested, a dessicant like silica gel or calcium chloride will absorb water from oil. You will need more of the dessicant than the water you want to remove. I have not tried this myself.
Reply to
anorton
If that's the case, I didn't see where Karl said that the oil was fully emulsified.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
That's called "form oil" when it lands on your concrete-mixing plywood scrap, Ed - should be fine.
Reply to
Ecnerwal
but I kept it so clean.
I was kidding Iggy. I wouldn't have put something that couldn't take the oil under my stove. But I do try to keep it off of my mixing tools.
Now I have to get rid of the mess of oil and water...
Reply to
Ed Huntress
What I am saying is that at 200-220 degrees, the water (in droplets) does not have the energy to explode. I would just heat the oil in a boiling water bath.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus17069

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.