Rotary Tables?

Hi, I've had the Soba rotary table for about a year and have found it very useful both with and without the dividing plates. Never yet used the tailstock though. Regarding the size, it depends on the work you will be doing and the size of your machine. The most useful accessory to make or buy is a morse taper fitting with your lathe headstock fitting so that you can move work directly from the lathe to the mill without rechucking.
Russell.
Reply to
russell eberhardt
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Hi all,
Im looking at buying a rotary table and wondered if anyone here has
experiance of the Shoba tables from Chronos? The 6" one with dividing
plates and tailstock looks quite reasonably priced at 140ukp?. Or any
recommendations for what to get? my budget is less than 150ukp, and I
think a 6" RT would be most useful.
thanks
Dave
Reply to
dave sanderson
There have been some reasonably priced ones on ebay recently, could save yourself a few pounds by holding on for a while and seeing what comes along. Also put a post on the model engineering sales/wants site, that often brings something nice along :-))
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The larger sizes tend to be cheaper as well, always worth remembering.
Peter -- Peter & Rita Forbes Email: snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk Web:
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Reply to
Peter A Forbes
Think about the size. My 150 mm RT is often enough too small. You need room for clamping.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
I agree entirely, a 6 inch rt doesn't give much room for mounting things like a vice etc. My problem is the opposite though - I have one of the 6" Shoba tables from Chronos and it is a bit big for the 6" table on a VMC. If you have a wider table though then I'd follow Nick's advice.
Hth,
Reply to
Boo
Currently I dont have a mill, so it wont fit on any table... and the boring table to center height on my harrison is ~57mm, so even a 4" table is to big for that, and i think a 4" is to small to be very useful. currently I plan to use it for things like drilling the cylinder head bolt circles, dividing and such like,hence a set with all the bits seems like a good idea. One concern was what the quality is like, as I would be mail ordering, so wont be able to play with it until it gets here so to speak.
Dave
Reply to
dave sanderson
On a drill-press!? How will you find the center and move to the bolt circle?
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
well, the plan was to use a pointy scriber in the lathe to mark the pitch circle and then set this on the drill center, and then turn the handle to index round. what obvious flaw have I missed? I thnk that will work, though it's less conveniant than winding the table across on a mill. I have sucessfully divided for a 6 spoke flywheel using the 3 jaw chuck and a spirit level to make out both the rim and the hub and then carefully drilling the holes. it all lined up ok, but was less than easy ;) hence the interest in an easier dividing method...
Dave
Reply to
dave sanderson
No, that works, if you get the pitch circle precisely. If! But then, you could also use a compass (pair of compasses?) to divide it into 6 or 3 equal parts or a "center finder"*) to get 4 points.
*
) That thing:
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
I am aware of these sort of dividing methods, but they dont do odd numbers or fine divisions easily....ie With the cylinders the current engine has 5 bolts.... But once I have set the table to do the cylinder head as long as I dont move it the cylinder will end up on the same pitch circle and so the parts will mate? There is some (small) room for error in the absolute dia of the pitch circle. I plan to get a mill soon, just not this year, the garage is still in a state of disorganisation from absorbing Tim's Surface table (think it must have brought some disorganisation with it ;)
Dave
Reply to
dave sanderson
Could be done with a compass too. You also could drill the mating part off.
My point is: Don't buy an RT before you have a mill. Or maybe you discover that it doesn't match. Too big, too small, not enough room RT - spindle nose, mill has no tiltable table so you want an RT with a tiltable base, whatever.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
How do you divide by 5 accurately with compasses? Last time I tried drilling through one into the other I scrapped both parts, however that was a long time ago, before i improved my drill and its clamps.
Ok, I understand what you are geting at now...
Dave
Reply to
dave sanderson
If you know the PCD or circumference of the circle, divide by 5 and mark off with dividers.
Get a copy of the Zeus tables book, there are formulae in there for this sort of stuff.
Peter -- Peter A Forbes Prepair Ltd, Luton, UK snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk
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Prepair Ltd
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-Mark
Reply to
Mark Rae
Ah, Its been a while, but I do wonder if I covered that in school, I dont remember it...
Dave
Reply to
dave sanderson

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