Shaver sockets

Can you get adapters, or socket strips, for shaver sockets? I can't seem to find any
I have a single socket in my bathroom, but nowadays I need several more
for the toothbrush, the air flosser, an occasional GF's or visitor's toothbrush, as well as the shaver - these are all designed to be permanently connected on charge status.
thx,
-- Peter F
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Peter Fairbrother wrote:

I do hope not!
Those sockets have a low power isolating transformer behind the plate and an extension strip would soon overload it. They often have a thermal overload switch too which would mean that your devices would simply switch on and off until the thermal overload switch wore out.
Bob
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On 16/07/12 10:16, Bob Minchin wrote:

The toothbrush takes 6W, the air flosser 8W on charge. I don't know how much the shaver takes on charge, but call it 30 W total.
When the shaver is operating, as opposed to being on charge, it takes 80W.
So, it's not going to overload in a few minutes.
Afaics the transformer doesn't seem to get hot when the shaver is operating, although I haven't run it for hours. But I rather doubt the thermal overload would trip.
Anywhoo, no adpters doesn't exactly solve the safety problem ..
-- Peter Fairbrother

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The safety issue is not primarily about overloading, it's about electricity and water. This is the reason why there are no plug sockets in the bathroom, and the light switch is either on the outside, or operated by a pull string. Using a socket strip or adapter would compromise this.
Steve
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On 16/07/12 11:35, shazzbat wrote:

How?
-- peter Fairbrother

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Quite a difference: http://www.ehow.com/list_6617658_code-requirements-bathroom-electrical.html http://www.neweysonline.co.uk/Electricity-In-The-Bathroom/Static.raction
We in the US don't have to accomodate the peculiarities of structures built before 1600AD. I've lived in several, in Germany, with what seemed like the original plumbing.
It was hard enough to rewire and replumb the house I grew up in, built in 1830 and considered quite old here. My sister had to pull down and replace all the plaster to salvage the 1790 farmhouse they bought. Her husband learned post and beam (half-timbered, fachwerk) framing to keep the structural repairs and additions authentic.
jsw
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On 16/07/12 10:52, Peter Fairbrother wrote:

Oooops - toothbrush charger is rated 1.3W, air flosser charger is rated 4W, shaver on charge uses 2.3W.
Shouldn't trust other people's figures!
Shaver sockets are at least 20 VA continuous, so eg a four-way strip wouldn't be overloaded in normal use. Also there is no reason why a four-way adapter strip can't have overload protection etc built in.
-- Peter Fairbrother

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On 07/16/12 10:52, Peter Fairbrother wrote:

The safety issue is that shaver sockets are low power *isolation* transformers with closely defined leakage characteristics. If you run a socket strip and one of the plugged in device inputs ends up even partially earthed through damp ingress, there is then a potentially dangerous voltage between earth (water pipes) and all the other devices connected to the strip. The only safe way to do that is to either a) keep all the chargers outside the bathroom or b): use separate isolation transformers per appliance.
I wouldn't take the chance with my family, or myself. Would you ?...
Regards,
Chris
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On 16/07/12 22:12, ChrisQ wrote:

Prolly - but there is no reason why the adapter/strip couldn't have an isolation transformer for each socket.

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On 07/17/12 12:57, Peter Fairbrother wrote:

Well, exactly, but then you don't need the socket strip, as each transformer has it's own socket :-).
I only brought this up as some readers may not be aware of the safety issues...
Regards,
Chris
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On 18/07/12 21:53, ChrisQ wrote:

eh?
I envisage a strip with four or six sockets, about 6" by 1/2" by 1-1/2", and a tail with a shaver plug, which plugs into the normal shaver socket. Each socket in the strip is supplied by a fused 5W isolating transformer.
Or is that what you/we mean? :)
-- Peter

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On 07/18/12 22:37, Peter Fairbrother wrote:

No, crossed lines :-). I was thinking of several of the standard shaver sockets, each of which has it's own transformer and output socket.
Your solution takes up less space on the wall, but you need separate 2 core cables or multicore to the several transformers, wherever they are located, yes ?...
Regards,
Chris
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On 19/07/12 13:40, ChrisQ wrote:

I was thinking of a strip of say 4 sockets, with a tail, like a 4 or 6 way 13A strip, with a tx built into the strip, with one primary and several secondaries serving the 4 sockets in the strip.
Hope that's clear,
-- Peter Fairbrother
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Peter Fairbrother wrote:

Peter,
As the shaver sockets seem to have 2 pin sockets as many on the continent could you use a continental strip socket plugged into the shaver socket.
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On 07/19/12 17:59, Peter Fairbrother wrote:

That would work and you could even make a product to sell doing it, though the chinese would probably copy it within months. The only practical problem is that the transformer secondaries would all need to be on separate sections of the bobbin per output, to meet safety regs. Standard transformers of that type usually have a square shaped core with a bobbin on opposite sides...
Regards,
Chris
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I thought that if you were using it in a bathroom, each socket has to have its own isolating transformer which makes multiple sockets expensive. When rechargeable toothbrushes were first available there were reports of problems with overheating of the transformers which were only designed for intermittant use with shavers so they had time to cool down between uses. continuous use was not part of their specification - hopefully modern ones have a higher rating.
Are you sure that you are meant to keep the charger plugged in and on? The instructions with the rechargeable toothbrush that we have used for several years recommends only recharging when it makes a rapid beeping sound and turn off when the green light stops flashing.
Alan
--
snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk
snipped-for-privacy@riscos.org
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On 16/07/12 11:16, Alan Dawes wrote:

I think modern chargers use less wattage than early ones, and aremeant to be kept on full-time.
Not absolutely sure for the toothbrush, though it makes sense - it takes16 hours for a full charge - but the air flosser is meant to be plugged-in full-time, it's in the instructions.
-- Peter Fairbrother

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Peter Fairbrother wrote:

My Braun toothbrush says it can be left on charge all the time but it is unnecessary and wastes power. It flashes red when the battery is low and takes nominally 16 to 18 hours to charge. It gets charged in the kitchen about once a week. My flosser comes on a reel and is hand powered.

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[snip]
Alan makes a good point; most electric toothbrushes still have NiCd or NiMH batteries*, and it does these no good to be left on trickle charge all the time; they should be fully discharged and then fully charged to avoid memory effects.
*I got fed up of my toothbrush batteries losing their capacity, and searched in vain for one with a Li-ion battery. Since the batteries are non-replaceable, ISTM very environmentally wasteful to put short life rechargeables in these things.
David
--
David Littlewood

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On 16/07/12 12:10, David Littlewood wrote:

At least some Sonicare toothbrushes have Li-ion batteries. I think some of the newer Braun / Oral B ones might do too.
-- Peter Fairbrother
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