Solid Works. 3D design

Hi, Does any company or employee in the southeast of England eg
Kent,Sussex,Surrey,Essex have a requirement for SolidWorks 3D design.
This is a massive tool for designing anything from a resistor to a
ship. It has many time saving features. Have a loot at the website and
get back to me.
formatting link

Reply to
paul-kent
Loading thread data ...
We don't buy the product of callers at the door even if we need that type of product. Sorry, you and SolidWorks are black listed as far as I'm concerned.
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
Some of us already have it and do a pretty damn good job ourselves...
formatting link
Peter
Reply to
Peter Neill
No, no, not at all.
Free samples are accepted gladly. :-)
Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones
You are obviously selling this (you say) wonderful thing. So just say how much for what. Rather than expect us poor punters to get interested and lock into you amazing drafting system. I am sure it comes with superb free back etc. So just tell us that or shut the f*** up
Reply to
alan
Solidworks is £5000 a seat and another £1250 a year for maintenance. I reckon this Herbert is trying to sell dodgy copies so probably best avoided by all.
Peter
Reply to
Peter Neill
In article , snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com writes
Looks interesting, but from what I have heard it is prohibitively (by my standards) expensive. Where websites do not quote prices, the old adage "if you need to ask the price, you can't afford it" springs to mind.
Anyone have any in-depth practical experience of the package?
David
Reply to
David Littlewood
Saladworks (as some call it) is the little (cheap, by their standards) brother of CATIA. I have worked with CATIA some years ago. It's a mind banger. Lot of fun to work with, but also takes about a month (fulltime) to learn. Only thing that was ummm ... not so good was making a set of drawings out of your models.
Unfortunately, the company where I could use it went down the drain.
This one took a day to model (included modeling the neat screws):
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
Yep. Been using it for the last 5 years to make money:)
It is a very powerful mid-range modeller, improvements added to the base package every year (subscription fee...) have made it the leading mid-range system around.
Autodesk Inventor is catching up, but still a couple of releases behind Solidworks in functionality.
If you need to do mechanical 3D design it is a *brilliant*, easy to use package. The high-end modellers litke Catia, UG, and Pro-E will outperform it in a number of areas, but you don't need these unless you're Ford or BMW.
And I think Nick was being overly-optimistic about 1 month to learn Catia, around a year or so sounds more like it.
However, for 2D draughting I styill far prefer AutoCad, it's far easier for straightforward 2D work that Solidworks. I haven't upgraded my AutoCad since the 2000i version and probably won't do so at any point.
Peter
Reply to
Peter Neill
In article , Peter Neill writes
Thanks Peter. I should have said I'm really more interested in the stress analysis bits rather than plain drafting. If you know, how do these compare?
David
Reply to
David Littlewood
Beware! Not completely. It certainly takes longer to master it. Solids, constraints, assembly and kinematics. The one who owned the CATIA was impressed with my progress. Also I think I'm quite good modeling things in my head and thinking in extruding, rotating, cutting off, pathes, merging and all those operations. For another guy who was also working in the automotive sector, I quickly draw the bell-shaped housing of a rotary engine to show him where to put the raisers etc. for casting that part. He was close to hire me. :-)
I'd *really* like to have one. To me, CAD looks like some mathematical/logical video-game. Have been trying out Alibre, but wasn't happy with it. Even if it is much cheaper.
Ah well, gonna have to play in the lottery this weekend...
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
God if i thought i would got so many replies from non-engineering type people i would not have posted it. I wanted to get away from the chatroom type thing, and what one guy called me...well. Seems the net really is for idiots, if anyone has any real requirements please contact me, and yes i do sell it for a living, so looking for honest people with requirements for cost saving software.
Reply to
paul-kent
Cost Saving and SolidWorks? Actually I can see that it could save money, but you need a big bank balance to actually get started. After the very good sales demo of it I can see how it might be of use, but since most of my suppliers still need parchment copies of drawings to work from, the limitations when working 2D caused me a concern. And £250 for TurboCAD Pro seemed like a much better investment to sell with a CNC Milling Machine that costs less than £3k :)
Reply to
Lester Caine
In article , snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com writes
(1) You must be a little short on reality if you post a blatant spam to a recreational newsgroup and don't expect to get comments from recreational users.
(2) Even when you post on usenet, you don't "own" the thread, anyone is free to make any responses or observations - preferably (but not always) vaguely relevant.
(3) Several of the people on here, including some who responded, do "real" engineering. I myself, though not a professional engineer, am assisting an engineering research project of potentially large significance, and my interest in the stress analysis part of the package was quite serious.
(4) Throwing your toys out of the pram is not generally the best way to win friends and influence people. It would be interesting to take a straw poll to see how many people here would be (a) more or (b) less likely to recommend you to friends after seeing your attitude.
David
Reply to
David Littlewood
Dave -
Allow me to predict the outcome of your proposed straw poll to save you the bother of conducting it...
(a) 0% (b) 100%
Regards, Tony
Reply to
Tony Jeffree
Paul -
Having read your posts in this thread it is painully obvious that you are in dire need of a spot of PR and marketing consultancy.
As a consultant with many years of experience (none of it in PR and marketing - but hey - that never stopped any consultant worth their salt), I would be delighted to offer you an introductory consultation for *only* the cost of a 5-seat Solid Works licence. A massive cost saving to you as I am sure you will agree, and one that will boost your productivity in no time at all. After the introductory consultation, I'm sure that you will be more than happy to sign up for my annual retainer.
Looking forward to a long and fruitful (for me) business relationship -
Regards, Tony
Reply to
Tony Jeffree
Well get this, we use Solidworks at work and if I find that we're buying from you, I'll make well sure we use a different distributor. Spamming is *not* a valid form of marketing and I hope your company goes bust if this is how you treat potential customers.
Chris
Reply to
Chris Eilbeck
If you are a so-called professional then why are you hiding behing an anonymous hotmail address and refusing to actually say who you are, or what company you represent? No one in their right mind would take a post like this seriously if they were about to spend £5k+ on a software package.
Regards Kevin
Reply to
Kevin
Most of the people on this newsgroup are in fact quite seriously into engineering, either as a hobby or as employment or both.
You should learn a little more about Usenet and spamming/advertising before you start calling people for what they have said.
The people that make/sell Solidworks as a company must be pretty short of sales if they have to resort to this sort of sales pitch, which is pretty obviously getting you and your client absolutely nowhere, fast.
Peter -- Peter & Rita Forbes Email: snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk Web:
formatting link
Reply to
Peter A Forbes
David, Solidworks has a built-in simple stress analysis package. It is called CosmosXpress and is a basic stripped down version of the add-in package that can be bought seperately.
You can do static analysis only, no dynamic stuff, using different sets of restraints and load applications for force or pressure.
Here is a link to a zip file of a brief avi movie clip of it in action, showing an animation for part deformation and the stresses involved. This was a pressed stainless steel spring that we used to overmould as part of a gearbox sensor for the BMW K1200 motobike, and also used in the electronic gearchange for the Smart car.
formatting link
This was done inside Solidworks and took about 2 minutes to work through the analysis.
Peter
Reply to
Peter Neill

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.