Mars Exploration Rovers Update - February 13, 2004

wrote


spottiness
in
images?
indeed.
it
of
sunlight
catch
like
I saw that specimen. If these are the "true" colors, the first thing that really strikes me is that the blue color is highly reminiscent of the mineral azurite. Just a thought.
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What's been driving me crazy is an explanation for the segregation of dark blue pebbles from the lighter colored ones. What's going on there?
--
Greg Crinklaw
Astronomical Software Developer
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You got it. At first it seeed to be an artifact of the stitching, but that doesn't quite make sense with the curved boundaries.
Also note that the circular boundary between the light and dark pebbles has "cracked" the overlying rocks:
http://www.copperas.com/astro/berrybowl.jpg
Like it's a circular depression and the berries are rolling towards the center of it?
Joe
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February 16, 2005
Joe Knapp wrote:

Testable hypotheses : subsidence, sublimation.
Thomas Lee Elifritz http://elifritz.members.atlantic.net
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Joe Knapp wrote:

Looking at the panorama, this is actually a fairly steep slope of the loose material that forms the crater edges...
--
Greg Crinklaw
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Hi All!
I'm not any sort of geologist, but I've been vastly enjoying the ongoing discussion on the possible origin of the "blueberries". I don't have all the vocabulary, but the judicious use of a geological dictionary helps me over the rought patches.

has
It would be interesting to see a bit of the larger context..
Could the circular "berry bowl" simply be an airbag bounce mark?
Perhaps the bag impact knocked a lot of dust off?
Simeon
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Simeon Nevel wrote:

That's exactly what I thought -- but even though I'm a geologist, that does not mean I know any more about this than you or anyone else!!!!!
--
_____________________________________
Richard I. Gibson, Gibson Consulting
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Richard I. Gibson wrote:

It takes a little doing due to the difference in perspective but I did identify this region on the panorama. The area behind the rocks (top) is the side of a "dune" for lack of a better word (the loose material at the crater edge). It doesn't look like the lander bounced/rolled that far in that direction.
I can also add that this area is in the original hematite map. The resolution is low, but it is possible to discern that there is no difference in hematite content between the dark spherule regions and that where the lighter shperules are found. In fact, it also appears that, looking at places where there are high concentrations of spherules, that they really aren't the source of hematite after all. Perhaps the hematite is in the sand grains, maybe those blowing in from beyond the crater.
--
Greg Crinklaw
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I hate to say it. That is what I've been thinking all along. One of the high resolution images of the spherules contained on spherule that has been battered. On the right edge of that spherule I noticed a small crystal. It was very small, but was obviously not the shape of hematite. Honestly,. it looked more like a silicate than anything else, as it looked tetragonal or orthrombic, not trigonal, as would be the case if it was hematite. Having said that, the resolution wasn't high enough to get a good enough look at it to make any real determination as to what the crystal form actually is. I have a copy of this image, if you are interested. Unfortunately I am not able to access my FTP site at the moment. If you want, I could e-mail it to you.
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If the hematite is in the sand grains, what it confining it to Meridiani Planum, an area several hundred miles in extent and reportedly a very ancient surface (> 1 billion years)?
If it comes from the bedrock there, it is naturally confined to that area.
Joe
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Difference in density?
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February 15, 2004
George wrote:

Yes. But only you are in trouble. Conclusions are called falsifiable hypotheses, crackpot. You test them, with experiments, and further evidence, to produce more conclusion and hypotheses. It's called the scientific method. However, being the crackpot that you are, you ridicule, then dismiss, and and remain skeptical, without offering any evidence, except that you still remain a crackpot.
Thomas Lee Elifritz http://elifritz.members.atlantic.net
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go look at the mushrooms
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you
and
trouble.
hypotheses, crackpot. You test them, with experiments, and further evidence,

method. However, being the crackpot that you are, you ridicule, then

that you still remain a crackpot.

Gee, I haven't felt the need to do this in a long, long time. So it gives me great pleasure to say to you PLONK!
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February 15, 2004
George wrote:

Crackpot keyword : 'plonk'.
Another crackpot down, 6 billion more crackpots to go.
Too bad they are breeding like ... rabbits.
Thomas Lee Elifritz http://elifritz.members.atlantic.net
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says...

Well, there you are dead wrong. The plagioclase on the Moon was formed when the early Moon, just after accretion, developed a "magma ocean" in which plagioclase flotation resulted in an anorthositic crust. (Anorthosite is a rock made up mostly of a single mineral, plagioclase.) The plag at the Apollo 14 site was excavated from the highland materials (i.e., the brecciated remnants of the original lunar crust) in the target area of the Imbrium impact. The Fra Mauro formation on which Apollo 14 landed is a huge splash sheet of ejecta from the Imbrium impact -- very little (if any) rock from the original local surface remains on the surface at the landing site. According to the experts who have studied the Apollo 14 rock samples, not even Cone Crater was deep enough to punch through the Imbrium ejecta. So everything at Fra Mauro was originally located somewhere in what is now Mare Imbrium.
The interesting thing is that there seems to have been a fair amount of mare basalt in the Imbrium target rock, since many of the clasts and some of the matrices in the breccias collected by Shepard and Mitchell are indeed basaltic, and analyze out at anywhere from 3.9 to 4.1 billion years old, considerably older than the age of the Imbrium impact itself (which is somewhere between 3.83 and 3.86 billion years). But the impact melt itself, as collected at Fra Mauro, is predominately noritic (anorthosite with some admixture of olivine).
I'd like to see a cite for these "spherules" from the Apollo 14 collection -- I've seen a lot of discussion of the breccias from the site, and seen it noted that ALL of the Apollo 14 samples are indeed breccias. Perhaps you're thinking of spherical clasts within the breccias? I'd love to know which sample numbers you're speaking of...
Doug snipped-for-privacy@NOSPAM.mn.rr.com
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snipped-for-privacy@george.net says...

Thank you -- I have it here and will read through it. I guessed you might have been talking about clasts in breccia -- which are rather different in formation, crystallization, etc., than what we appear to be seeing in the "blueberries" at Meridiani. But yes, I am very much looking forward to reading this and I'll make some comments later today. Again, thanks for the link!
Doug snipped-for-privacy@NOSPAM.mn.rr.com
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De nada. By the way, thanks for the links for maestro. I'll try to mess around with it today.
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