Master Thesis proposal

I'm studying computer science at Computer Engineering Groups at DII, and now I want to gain some practical experience and I must do a
Master Thesis. I would like to make practical use of the theoretical knowledge I have acquired during your studies and, I would like to spend four to six months participating in some of projects in the field of automation systems. I have a question: the Master Thesis about a new robot control is an object useful for the future job?
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On Oct 12, 7:20 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

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On Oct 12, 7:20 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Certainly. But then again, any Masters thesis done well will be a useful object for a future job. The question is, which job? A robotics based thesis will appeal to those looking to hire robotics experienced individuals. Using a PLC on some other control application will probably appeal to 10x as many potential employers. There's more money in, shall I call it sub-robotics?, than in robotics itself.
If you aren't experienced in robotics, 4 to 6 months of hard and focused work, will qualify you as a rank beginner. (You could probably make a kit into a functioning robot, and may or may not add one or two unique additions showing a slight improvement to the overal body of the field.) So to an employer, you will look like someone with an interest, but not someone well versed in robotics. (I say this after ~40 years in electronics, and after 6 years of intensive pushing myself in robotics, and even though I am now an University instructor in robotics, I just consider myself becoming somewhat rounded in some limited areas of the field. Robotics is so interdisciplinary, there is so much to learn, that it takes a long while to pass all the preliminaries, and get to new research.)
Your greatest danger is choosing too broadly, and having nothing unique or new to show at the end of your thesis.
Randy
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Hi again, I wanted to amplify on my above post with something written on SeattleRobotics list by Robert Scheer descibing his first year in robotics:
"The most difficult and time-consuming part of innovating is in the electronics and especially in the sensory processing, computational, control and behavior domains. In my one year in this hobby, I've already learned how to program in C, designed my first 3 circuit boards, programmed several AVR microcontroller applications, confronted the technologies of echolocation, computer vision, PID control, GPS, odometry, gyros, accelerometers, magnetometers, Kalman filters, wireless LAN, serial communication.... and many more. I've set up embedded Linux computers that control and exchange data with a handful of microcontrollers. I've learned how to share memory between programs running in parallel, how to run a GUI controlling one computer on a separate, remote wireless tablet computer, how to create a boot image in a USB flash memory stick and so forth. I would very much like to accomplish stereovision obstacle avoidance and EERUF sonar in the next couple of months. It seems like the challenges of making robots smart enough and able to sense the world well enough are still the big challenges. ... There are too many other things getting in the way. I'm not smart enough. I don't want to cram one more esoteric subject into my aging noggin, eg digital signal processing just so that my robot won't hit that tree. Sitting another hour at the computer will drive me insane."
It has taken Robert a year to get a handle of some of these essoteric subjects. If you aren't already up on most of those subjects, "echolocation, computer vision, PID control, GPS, odometry, gyros, accelerometers, magnetometers, Kalman filters, wireless LAN, serial communication" you may find 4 to 6 months simply too few to get to the working robot you had anticipated.
Randy
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On Oct 12, 6:20 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

It's not clear what you have in mind as regards "new robot control", but a literature search is the first step in any academic research project. You'll find, for AI and robotics, that Citeseer is a great resource, and has 100s if not 1000s of papers on robot control available online ...
http://www.google.com/custom?q=citeseer+robot+control
Click on one, and you'll find links to 50 more. Iterate.
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dan michaels wrote:

Personally I would not do a thesis on "robot control." Though it looks fancy on your VC, there are virtually no "robotics" jobs out there, and the related fields may consider a thesis in robotics to be too limiting.
The same day the OP asked about a master thesis idea, someone else wrote a job candidancy post looking for industrial control engineers. THAT is the work you want to go after, because it exists today, there's plenty of it worldwide, and it's basically a "robot" that has its base bolted to the floor. Some of the latest factory automation lines even use AI.
-- Gordon
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