Why use Industrial robot?

It looks like that the industrial world will use more and more
industrial robot to improve the productivity, the qulity and to help
people to do the dangerous tasks.
But still some one want to know more details :why use and how to
chosse an industrial robot?
Reply to
Bruce
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Bruce, this seems like a strange question. You've repeated it and made similar posts over the past couple months. It looks like a homework question, so I'm nost surprised you haven't gotten many responses.
You can't explain how to choose an industrial robot until you know why you want to use one. You've already listed the reasons why to use one - productivity or protection rom dangerous tasks. You might add consistency, repeatability, accuracy, or any one of a dozen other concerns associated with manufacturing, since industrial robots are almost exclusively used in production.
What other answer are you looking for?
Randy M. Dumse
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Reply to
RMDumse
Thank you for your kindly reply. Randy. yes.I know some reasons why we must use industrial robot.I also ask this question to some of my friends who works for industrial robot company,and their answer is that "the robot can do what a human can not do." Yes.It is exactly right. And this is not a homework question,I posted this question just want to know what you guys think about this question? And you may have some other special views about it.
Reply to
Bruce
Why? To save money.
How to Choose? Hire an independent expert. This is always important for a high-cost item if you don't already have the in-house knowledge to decide. There are also service companies that specialize in automation sells... but they will be biased towards the products they sell. Still, they may be your best bet if you are going towards the lower-end of the price spectrum.
Joe Dunfee
Reply to
Joe
Thank you very much for your valuable reply. Joe.
It is a good idea that to find an expert to help to decide the solution of robotized workcell.
Reply to
Bruce
"Bruce" a écrit dans le message de news: snipped-for-privacy@w5g2000hsg.googlegroups.com...
I agree with Joe, hire an independant expert. I'm too connected to Adept,Staubli,Fanuc to be independant, and I'm french......
Reply to
marchenchuches
What is the low side of the price range for a new industrial robot arm? (lets say for example a 6DOF pick and place arm with about 2 feet of reach). I have been looking for something to experiment with that has a few pounds of lifting capacity and have not seen anything less than US$13000.
Also, is there one common standard for talking to an industrial robot or are there many custom protocols?
-howy
Reply to
howy
"howy" a écrit dans le message de news: snipped-for-privacy@m36g2000hse.googlegroups.com...
For $13000, look after used robots.
I developped my own custom common standard protocol for Fanuc,Unimation,Staubli,Adept robots.
Reply to
marchenchuches
Hi,howy,
I got some rules to choose an industrial robot. It depends on the weight of the workpiece you want to pick and place, the reach,the speed, and the work enviroment,etc. of your application need. so you must first know all above specifications and then can help you to choose that industrial robot.
Reply to
Bruce
So they all have their own proprietary protocols? Seems pretty primitive. If I were to design and sell my own semi-industrial robotic arm would I could cook up my own protocol or is there a De Facto standard? Maybe I support all the popular protocols... Is your protocol documented? What do you use it for?
-howy
Reply to
howy
Perhaps you'd like an example.
In the early 1980's Rockwell Int. was making gyros for nuclear submarines. These electrostatically levatated beryllium spheres had to be incredibly round and smooth, and any impurities left on them would cause the field to discharge. So they had to be extremely clean as well.
They tried to use clean room techniques with humans, but they just weren't getting them clean. The very fact that they were humans involved introduced the dirty they were trying to remove. For instance, even the rubber gloves would sluff off particles during handling.
So they built a small robot to do the cleaning. It would pick up the lower case assembly in its grippers, and methodically swing it under a stream of solvent, then set it down. Then the rotor ball, do the same, set it down, and regrip at a different angle, and clean again, then place in the lower cup. Then the upper cup was cleaned and placed over the assembly.
The end result was with a human, and 24-hours effort to clean, about 30% passed inspection and became operational. With the robot, the process took less than 20 minutes, and was near 100% perfect. Rockwell chose to use an industrial robot for its repeatability, its reliability, and its ability to be where humans should not be.
-- Randy M. Dumse
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Reply to
RMDumse
It is a good example to explain why we choose industrial robot. Thank you!! Randy.
Reply to
Bruce
"howy" a écrit dans le message de news: snipped-for-privacy@n2g2000hse.googlegroups.com...
Usually they do.
Yes, but it's propietary.
I use it to build applications residing 100% in a PC, using the robot as a peripheral. That means you can change the robot brand without changing a comma in the program. More than 100 robots in the shoe industry run that way.(roughing, sole trimming, glue dispensing) 5 robots run that way in the energy industry. (hydro turbines repair welding and grinding)
Reply to
marchenchuches

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