do the regs cover coil guns

He's lucky he did it 15 billion years ago... there would be no way the fire marshal would approve the storage for that much stuff these days!
-dave w
Reply to
David Weinshenker
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I believe I stand corrected about the aluminum. I learn something new everyday. Read Rick's post to mine...
Anyway, the rest is still rather unweildy at this point. I have yet to see someone with something very portable that would acheive a worthy altitude.
~ Duane Phillips.
Reply to
Duane Phillips
Thanks Rick! Truly enlightening, and I stand corrected.
How did you handle a 75" diameter alminum pipe? That had to be some project.
~ Duane Phillips.
Reply to
Duane Phillips
But that is not federal law and that matters. One can always leave a blue state to be free.
Reply to
AlMax
No a full auto weapon is a Class three Weapon, not a class 3 destructive device.
I can get a Class three permit for a full auto weapon much easier then it took to obtain the leup, since I don't have to have storage for the Class 3 weapon. The fed requirements are easy if you are clean.
Now if you are in a blue state, expect added state & local measures to make it more difficult, if not impossible.
But in my state, they are pretty a matter of route to obtain for the true law abiding.
Reply to
AlMax
Not unlike a discussion with my HS religion teacher. He retired from teaching after the semester.
Teachers were not happy to have me. A bit later, after seeing my chemistry test papers, my father wound up having a few educational sessions with my pimply-faced, just-out-of-college high school teacher.
Dad had a PhD in the subject, and the teacher never dared mark me wrong on something without his approval thereafter.
Reply to
Scott Schuckert
Sorry, you are wrong. I am in the firearms business. Class 3 is Class 3. You DO have to have proper Fed approved storage for Class 3 items no matter what they are. You also are subject to inspection and the approval process as are LEUP holders. You storage must be approved by ATFE. I know, I've been there.
Reply to
Mark & Deborah Lewis
Hi Alan,
Does/did the fact a history was involved make it more approved to you ?
I don't say this to disrespect, but if you only respect something because of a history of doing it, then what made it proper back in the day ?
something should be just as proper doing it today if it never was done before.
Reply to
AlMax
No Disrespect Mark.
Ok, please describe the required storage for a suppressor for a .22 long handgun ?
The storage requirements for Class 3 full auto require you to have a distance requirement ?
I don't want a debate,
my point is that getting a class 3 is alot easier then a leup in most (39?) states.
you can even find an easy work around for the chief authority if running a business.
Reply to
AlMax
So since you are talking guns, (I am not a gun owner), never wanted them.
What guns can a minor directly own, or own with adult purchase?
Jerry
Reply to
Jerry Irvine
Not to me. However, I do appreciate learning new interesting bits of knowledge and history.
What makes that historical bit interesting to me is that, it may have some bearing on our legislators. The same legislators that allow us up to 50 lbs or PB for use in antique firearms, etc. may approve of using BP for historical reenactments of anvil launching as well.
Alan
Reply to
Alan Jones
Dad must own the firearm today. back in the old days JR could.
JR can use the firearm under Dad's supervision.
National Firearms purchase rules, you need a national background check to buy and own them.
JR can have a bb gun running around loose in the woods in my state, but not in the state up north from me. But Dad must by the BB gun. (CSPC again here since BB guns are not firearms ?)
Reply to
AlMax
A minor under the age of 18 cannot legally own a firearm. A minor may possess a firearm in the presence and supervision of an adult who is legally able to own a firearm. Minors over the age of 18 may own(purchase) a long gun(rifle or shotgun). This can vary state by state according to state law. A person must be 21 or older to purchase a handgun.
Some states and local municipalities require registration and permits for any firearms. Check with locals for restrictions in your area.
Reply to
Mark & Deborah Lewis
Ok here is where it gets dicey, supressors are an odd animal. First, is the suppressor assembled or in componet pieces? If it is in componet pieces the there is no requirements due to the fact it is not a suppressor until it is assembled. If it is assembled then the same requirements are for full auto weapons and destructive devices. A permanent (a 500# gunsafe quallifies as permanent since it would take heavy equipment to move it)strong box capable of denying anyone access to the device but the one who holds the liscence(locked). This box must be diagramed as to it's location in the structure where it is stored. This diagram must be included with the application and will be inspected before the liscence is issued. The box is subject to approval by ATFE agents. This may be inspected quarterly or yearly at the field office's discretion and capability. There are no distance requirements.
Anyway, I agree with you that in some states you have less hoops to jump through to own full auto weapons and various other restricted weapons. LEUP is just another attempt of the Feds to regulate law abiding citizens. Obviously Terroists are not going to get one to store explosives anyway. This only affects those of us who wish to enjoy this hobby. It will have no impact on those with evil intent. Like the People's Republic of New Jersey you need a permit for a paintball gun. Ridiculous.
No offense taken. Just wished we were talking about something else. My son is in Iraq right now fighting for these rights we enjoy and now our government is slowly eroding the rights my son is ready to lay down his life to defend.....I'm a little testy. My appologies.
Reply to
Mark & Deborah Lewis
Perhaps if we only used our "explosive" materials to reenact historical events (such as the Mercury or Apollo launches) they'd leave us all alone?
Reply to
Scott Schuckert
I remember ninety grade at a small rural high school, in Iowa about 1970. Many of the kids were hunters and shooters. Some hunt before and after school and keep guns, mostly rifles and shotguns, in cars parked in the school parking lot. They would go around school all day openly talking about guns. This school also seemed to have a high rate of bullying and fighting. Yet I can't recall a single incident there involving guns. I'm not saying that it was legal, or even the norm, but it was not a problem.
Alan
Reply to
Alan Jones

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