what does convolutely-wound mean?

Exactly what does the term convolutely-wound mean? Can you back it up with a web reference? I have received several different definitions.
Ted Mahler
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On Tue, 20 Jun 2006 15:14:43 -0500, "Ted Mahler"

Start here - http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=%22convolute+wound%22
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A jelly roll is convolutely wound.
A barber pole or candy cane is spiral wrapped.
Cardboard model rocket motor casings are convolutely wound.
Model rocket body tubes are spiral wrapped.
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Except for BT-30 and BT-40...
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So,,, parallel wound is the same convolutely wound.
Ted
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Good question. I know they're talking about rolled up tubes. But the terminology stumps me. I keep trying to connect it to: integral[(f(tau)g(t-tau)dtau]
Somehow I don't think that fits :)
Doug
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The formula you gave is for a mathematical operation known as convolution. It is used to calculate the response of a dynamic system given the input signal and the impulse response of the system.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Convolution
http://www.see.ed.ac.uk/~mjj/dspDemos/EE4/tutConv.html
How did this get convolved with the term "convolutely-wound"? Are you trying to translate a technical paper from a foreign language?
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Doug Sams wrote:

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<vbg>
No, it's just that whenever the topic of BT-30 comes up, so too does the term "convolute wound". Whereupon I think of the convolution integral (which was a royal PITA for many EE students).
More seriously, I do wonder how the term "convolute" came to be applied to a parallel wound tube. It hardly strikes me as being convolved. (I forego the ly suffix since I rarely see it used, but my inner grammarian wants to append it.)
And BT-30 certainly doesn't appear to involve forcing functions or impulse responses in any way :)
Doug
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http://www.pptube.com/products/prod_convolute.html
Doug Sams wrote:

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Thanks. Good info. I was inspired to look it up at dictionary.com . Basically, convolute and convolved both mean rolled up. So the mathematical use of the term appears to be a morph from the earlier meaning.
That makes sense now, but I don't think I ever heard (any variation of) the term until Professor Yeh first put it on the chalk board.
Doug
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