Flatten a solid

I'm looking for a solution to the following:
I have a part. It's like a propeller of a prop plane. It's close to the same profile along the length, but twists axially. I need to make
a model that shows what that propellor would look like if it was untwisted as close as flat as possible without distorting the crossectional profile. I've used the deform feature in SW but it does not work. I can change the shape, but the mass changes also. It's more of a geometrical deformation instead of a physical deformation. It breaks laws of physics. I know this is not what those tools were designed to do. My question is, is there a tool in SW that can do what I'm looking for? If not, is there any other software package that can do this?
Thanks.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I have done such things. I requires a working knowledge of descriptive geometry and a lot of patience. The project I did this on was with warped sheet metal and the accuracy of the finished part only needed to be +/-1/16". In other words, there is no automatic way to do this. You have to use the old methods you would have used on the drawing board.
TOP
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Thanks.
For this, I need very good accuracy, and the geometry is very complex. That's why I was hoping there was a package out there that could do it. I ahve heard a rumor that something exists, but have been unable to locate it. Any thoughts would be appreciated!
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On Apr 24, 1:01 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Blankworks, perhaps?
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wrote:

"Blankworks, perhaps?"
Forming Technologies has a range of products for this purpose and they are avaliable directly or as part of Vero Internationals progeressive die design package.
JC
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Just a dumb thought here:
1. create a series of parallel planes that cut the twisted profile. 2. on each plane create a contour of the outline of the prop. 3. using derived sketches stack the profiles on a plane parallel to the original prop. 4. loft (centerline loft) 5. check volume as a sanity check.
How many planes you will need is up to you. There is obvious deformation needed to get what you want. So what is acceptable is up to you.
TOP Sometimes there is just no easy solution.
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Thanks for the many suggestions. Sounds like some good leads here, and I will be investigating all of them. I really appreciate the help.
- Luther
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On 26 Apr, 00:13, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I have done something similar to produce a label for a bottle, I downloaded a 15 day trial version of geometryworks (http:// www.cadcamcomponents.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=products.details_3d) which allows you to extract a curved surface and then flatten it out - you can then use this data to create a solid.
For me it was a one off request - and I didn't buy as it was quite expensive as I recall - However, I think you can now do something similar using Rhino - probably for a lot less expenditure.
Hope this helps,
Kev
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Let us know what works out.
Cheers TOP
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I will let you know how it goes. It will probably be a bit before I have an answer though. Thanks again for the help!
- Luther
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