Motherboard Chipsets?

I see in some MBs that there are different chipsets spec'd other than AMD or
Intel (i.e. nForce, VIA). What are these chipsets?
Thanks
Reply to
Edge
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One could write for hours about the relative merits of various current chipsets, not even to mention very fine chipsets of the recent past. Look in TomsHardware.com or Anandtech.com or Motherboards.org for some good info.
Chipsets control a lot of what goes on in a motherboard, and how. Some chipsets have been designed for specific forms of memory (RAM) and others to allow the use of more than one type (e.g., Rambus, SDRAM, DDR RAM) and differing speeds of the PC bus. Specifically right now Intel and nVidia (nForce) and SiS all make dual-channel memory architecture chipsets for the Intel CPU line, and VIA and SiS make great chipsets for the Athlon line. Maybe nVidia too (don't know) for the Athlon CPU boards.
'Spork'
Edge wrote:
Reply to
Sporkman
Are nForce, VIA etc. ancillary chipsets that work with the CPU or are they third parties modifying the design and/or manufacturing the CPU itself? Some of the MB manufacturer's list the alternate chipset model (i.e nForce) to replace the CPU model (i.e 845PE)?
Not to get of topic here, but are there other credible CPU bench mark tests for CPUs in addition to Toms hardware?
Thanks
Reply to
Edge
The ancillary chipsets are all the additional circuitry that your CPU needs to function. Not to get into microprocessor design, but a PC needs quite a bit of "glue" logic to be able to do things like talk to peripherals, memory, video cards, etc. The chipsets provide this glue logic. Once upon a time it was all done discretely with TTL logic. Compare a IBM PC-XT motherboard and a modern motherboard. There are hundreds more chips on an XT motherboard which has significantly less capability than a modern mobo.
Good luck,
Chris
Reply to
Chris Dubea
"Edge" wrote in news:hsf0b.104664$ snipped-for-privacy@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net:
*wistful sigh* I remember the good ol' days when the only spec you based your motherboard purchase on was CPU support (and maybe # of RAM slots).
Now, the list of considerations has grown quite long and complicated.
But then again, this is what enthusiasts crave--more options.
Reply to
Joel Moore

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