"Cheap housing"

I posted this on the MR forum and thought I'd ask for suggestions here as
well. Does anyone have a solution for affordable HO housing for their model
cities/towns/villages? Plastic kits today seem to be hovering around the
$20 mark and I need enough of them that that is kind of expensive. :
( I was just wondering if anyone knew of any off-brand for good houses.
It's funny that we have industrial kits for everything from blast furnaces
to pet shops, but normal HO houses seem to be few & far between. Afterall,
our HO citizens need to live somewhere, don't they???
Thanks!
dlm
---------------------------
Dan Merkel
Reply to
Dan Merkel
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Use CAD and your computer printer to turn real houses into models.
Reply to
Gregory Procter
Go to
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and search on "cut and assemble". They publish a number of books printed on heavy cardstock that make up into full color buildings in HO scale, including Victorian houses, New England village, New England seaport, western town, etc. You may not want them right along the front edge of the layout, but they are very good to fill in the middle distance and background. They are also great to initially populate a layout while you build your FSM and laser-cut kits. Gary Q
Reply to
Geezer
GP> Dan Merkel wrote: GP> GP> > I posted this on the MR forum and thought I'd ask for suggestions here as GP> > well. Does anyone have a solution for affordable HO housing for their model GP> > cities/towns/villages? Plastic kits today seem to be hovering around the GP> > $20 mark and I need enough of them that that is kind of expensive. : GP> > ( I was just wondering if anyone knew of any off-brand for good houses. GP> > It's funny that we have industrial kits for everything from blast furnaces GP> > to pet shops, but normal HO houses seem to be few & far between. Afterall, GP> > our HO citizens need to live somewhere, don't they??? GP> GP> Use CAD and your computer printer to turn real houses into models.
Someone posted an URL to a website of PDF files meant to be printed on card stock and then cut out and put together to make a number of little houses. The PDF files were 0 scale, but it should be possible to re-scale them (by 1/2) to get H0 scale houses.
I think there are some (commercial) supliers of 'card stock' buildings out there as well. These are *much* cheaper than plastic kits.
One of the reasons there are many kits for *industrial* building and few for *houses* is that few people build single-family housing in the midst of the train tracks. *Often* industrial buildings and train tracks share space. So, for "housing" most modelers just include a *backdrop* someplace with the houses (in the background), with the rail line in the foreground, complete with *industrial* sidings and *industrial* buildings.... Or else it is in a high-density cityscape, typically in the 'warehouse' district (which rarely has many 'houses').
GP> GP>
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Reply to
Robert Heller
Try
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Jim McInnes
I posted this on the MR forum and thought I'd ask for suggestions here as well. Does anyone have a solution for affordable HO housing for their model cities/towns/villages? Plastic kits today seem to be hovering around the $20 mark and I need enough of them that that is kind of expensive. : ( I was just wondering if anyone knew of any off-brand for good houses. It's funny that we have industrial kits for everything from blast furnaces to pet shops, but normal HO houses seem to be few & far between. Afterall, our HO citizens need to live somewhere, don't they???
Thanks!
dlm --------------------------- Dan Merkel
Reply to
ONRTNO
Any plastic kit of the complexity of a "simple house" will cost around $20, and may cost more if the market will absorb at most a few thousand copies. That's just the economics of making plastic kits. I think you're transferring the model railroader's natural low rating for houses ("they're just background for the _real_ action") to the pricing of kits. Unfortunately, the price of the kit is based on its costs, not our valuation of it.
Sigh.
Reply to
Wolf Kirchmeir
Try "Rix" and "City Classics" or "DPM" (Design Preservatiuon Miniatures). (I forget which of the latter two has a series called "camany houses)
Both have older small houses under $10.00
Don
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Reply to
Trainman
Dan=A0Merkel) I posted this on the MR forum and thought I'd ask for suggestions here as well. Does anyone have a solution for affordable HO housing for their model cities/towns/villages? Plastic kits today seem to be hovering around the $20 mark and I need enough of them that that is kind of expensive. : ( =A0 =A0 I was just wondering if anyone knew of any off-brand for good houses. It's funny that we have industrial kits for everything from blast furnaces to pet shops, but normal HO houses seem to be few & far between. Afterall, our HO citizens need to live somewhere, don't they??? ----------------------------------------------- Some of the IHC (Internaional Hobby Corp.) houses retail for around $10 and several DPM (Design Preservation Models) are less that $10, I believe.
Bill Bill's Railroad Empire N Scale Model Railroad:
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Reply to
Bill
I tend to grab a bit of .040" thick plastic stock and do the basic house and then cover with .010:" thick if special stuff is needed, Then again, I buy my styrene from a large plastics house in .010, .020 and .040" thicknesses in large ( 3'x4' sheets) at a very low cost and failrues are easy to amortize towards a better product.
-- Why isn't there an Ozone Hole at the NORTH Pole?
Reply to
Bob May
WK> Dan Merkel wrote: WK> > I posted this on the MR forum and thought I'd ask for suggestions here as WK> > well. Does anyone have a solution for affordable HO housing for their model WK> > cities/towns/villages? Plastic kits today seem to be hovering around the WK> > $20 mark and I need enough of them that that is kind of expensive. : WK> > ( I was just wondering if anyone knew of any off-brand for good houses. WK> > It's funny that we have industrial kits for everything from blast furnaces WK> > to pet shops, but normal HO houses seem to be few & far between. Afterall, WK> > our HO citizens need to live somewhere, don't they??? WK> > WK> > Thanks! WK> > WK> > dlm WK> > --------------------------- WK> > Dan Merkel WK> > WK> > WK> WK> WK> Any plastic kit of the complexity of a "simple house" will cost around WK> $20, and may cost more if the market will absorb at most a few thousand WK> copies. That's just the economics of making plastic kits. I think you're WK> transferring the model railroader's natural low rating for houses WK> ("they're just background for the _real_ action") to the pricing of WK> kits. Unfortunately, the price of the kit is based on its costs, not our WK> valuation of it.
Right. Manufactured kits are fine for one- or two- of. When, as a modeler, you need a lot of something, it is going to be cheaper to mass produce it yourself -- eg. bulk plastic sheets will be cheaper for example. Even, 'hand' mass produced from plastic sheets is not super cheap (and can be rather labor intensive). Fortunately, technology has come to the 'rescue': PCs, CAD software (or PhotoShop/GIMP), and color inkjet printers. All you need is some medium card stock and you can *print* your houses. Cut them out and with a little Elmer's, you are done. Instant H0 suburbia -- yes, you too can put up an H0 suburban housing pod with super cheap materials. :-)
WK> WK> Sigh. WK>
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Reply to
Robert Heller
I've heard about this... I guess there are even "home design" programs that are available that have the ability to print 3-D models in HO scale.
Has anyone tried any of these home design programs for this purpose? It seems that the ones I saw at Staples were Punch Software offerings. How do the models turn out? How does the computer handle roof lines? In my limited scratchbuilding efforts, it has always been the roof of a building that has caused me problems, especially where that roof intersects with another oneat a weird angle or different pitch.
Any input would be appreciated...
Thanks!
dlm
Reply to
Dan Merkel
And by the time you pay for the ink, what have they cost you?
I printed some window scenes for a block of stores and was amazed at how fast I used up an ink cartridge.
Reply to
Larry Blanchard
Bob -
Where are you located and what is the name of the large / bulk plastics house from which you obtain the 3' x 4' sheets?
Thank you.
Reply to
Jim McLaughlin
LB> LB> > Fortunately, technology has LB> > come to the 'rescue': PCs, CAD software (or PhotoShop/GIMP), and color LB> > inkjet printers. All you need is some medium card stock and you can LB> > *print* your houses. Cut them out and with a little Elmer's, you are LB> > done. LB> > LB> And by the time you pay for the ink, what have they cost you?
Even so, it will be less than $20+ per kit...
LB> LB> I printed some window scenes for a block of stores and was amazed at how LB> fast I used up an ink cartridge. LB> LB> -- LB> Homo sapiens is a goal, not a description LB>
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Reply to
Robert Heller
Hi- Here is my attempt. It worked out ok, but not great.
I think this would work if people put the time into making them look more realistic. I tried to modify the brick work in my building so it wasn't so sterile.
The best example of this was a barn, where it was constructed from actual pictures of a barn by Bob Boudreau. They are at
A good project would be to photograph some oter buildings and post them to a site ;-)
David
Reply to
David P Harris
Was it the cartridge that came with the printer? They're notorious for being only partially filled, since making money on the cartridges is why they sell them so cheap.
Reply to
Steve Caple
I know people who buy cheap printers and throw them away when the cartridges are used up, because it's cheaper than replacing the cartridges.
You might also consider the refill kits, or professionally refilled cartridges...
Reply to
Brian Paul Ehni
On Tue, 23 Nov 2004 10:12:57 -0800, Larry Blanchard purred:
Try a Canon printer. I get over 500 colour sheets from a cartridge. Besides you can refill ink and save as well so the per page cost is minuscule, well under 3 cents US.
cat
Reply to
cat
In The Newsgroup rec.models.railroad, (article ), Brian Paul Ehni at snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net says...
Cheap printers are also known for cheap quality, so I went against that notion when I bought my printer, I just replace one of the four tanks (one for each color, plus black) and/or the printhead.
Alan
Reply to
Alan Gilchrist
In The Newsgroup rec.models.railroad, (article ), cat at snipped-for-privacy@c> Try a Canon printer. I get over 500 colour sheets from a
Also make sure if you buy a Canon printer, that you get one with the Thinktank ink system, then you just replace whatever color you run out of.
Alan
Reply to
Alan Gilchrist

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