Newbie question re filling gaps in model and painting

Hi, silly question here, but I'm in the process of putting together the Walthers kit "Bud's Trucking Co." background building.
As part of putting this together, there is a section they call the weather bellows, where two sections glue together. I've glued it nicely, but there is still a joint between the two pieces.
What should I use to fill the joint? I need something that I can airbrush and won't look different than the rest.
Thanks, Scott
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hi
contact any model shop and ask for a plastic filler to suit your requirements
Cheers
Steve

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Scott spake thus:

Nope, not silly at all.

The usual stuff suggested (and I suppose used) is putty; a lot of people use a product called "Squadron". You can also get fillers for auto-repair purposes that are a lot cheaper. They all do basically the same thing: fill gaps. They stick pretty well to styrene (the plastic most kits are made of), and can be filed, shaped, sanded and painted.
Here's another type of filler you can use: I call it "styrene goop". All you need to do is dissolve some styrene (pieces of sprue from the model you're bulding will work fine) in a suitable solvent: the solvent cement you're using (Testors, Plastruct, etc.), or MEK (methyl ethyl ketone). Make a nice goopy mix, which you can then apply to the gap by brush, toothpick, or other tool. After it dries it will bond to the plastic and be as hard as it.
Just don't breathe too much of the solvent. Not good for you.
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On Sat, 10 Jun 2006 01:39:49 -0700, David Nebenzahl

Excellent advice. I used to work at a plant that manufactured auto a/c units. The various cases and ducts were made from ABS plastic that were thermoformed from sheets. We then ground up the excess and spoilage for resale to the plastic suppplier. The assembly dept would put some of this scrap along with some MEK in a kitchen blender with a metal container to make a concoction that was used for gluing and sealing various seams on the plastic cases; a great job for stoners. (this was pre OSHA)
fl@liner
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