Wood structure kits: sealing & painting

The 2nd volume of the new video series from MR shows a segment on putting together a laser-cut wood structure kit. The first step they
show is to spray the sheets of parts with a wood sealer to prevent moisture from warping the wood. This seems very sensible. The question is, where can I obtain such a sealer? I find nothing on the Testor-Floquil website that corresponds to this sealer, nor on the web sites for Home Depot or my local Ace Hardware store. I must be looking in the wrong place or under the wrong name. Can you help? Is such a sealer necessary?
A further question: I would normally paint the models with Polly Scale, a water-based paint. But considering the nature of the wood, should the paint instead be a spirit-based pint like Floquil?
Thanks for the help.
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Find a hobby shop that sells radio control planes. You want a sanding sealer of some kind.
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Frank Rosenbaum spake thus:

Which is just a fancy-schmancy name for lacquer (usually with a higher solids content). Just use any spray clear lacquer or varnish; it's not critical.
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

Or use Zinsser SealCoat. Comes in a spray can. IIRC, I saw it at Home Depot or Loews. It's shellac, not lacquer, and is totally non-toxic.
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Scalecoat has sanding sealer and thinner
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Probably ordinary pink primer would be quite o.k. Regards, Bill.

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snipped-for-privacy@cox.net wrote:

Shellac. Dilute 1 part to 6 parts denatured alcohol. Note: denatured alcohol. You don't want the 70% or 90% alcohol that contains water. You want straight denatured alcohol. Two to three coats should do it depending on the wood. If it's pine, go for at least 3. Use #0000 steel wool between coats if you get a residue. I'd use a brand-new brush and use it for this only.
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Jay Cunnington wrote:

IMO, a better method is to paint or stain all parts of any kit before assembly. This also seals the wood. It's easy enough to scrape/sand paint off surfaces to be glued.
HTH
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wrote:

I would not use sanding sealer at all , even though there are various chemical makesups for sanding sealer , none are compatible with all finishes IE: lacquer based sanding sealer is not compatible with Polyurethane. Thats the only one I can think of , but there are other non compatible combinations. The main use of sanding sealer is to raise the grain of the wood . The sealer has a hard finish so you can sand the wood fibers off after they raise without removing any finsih. After appyling sealer and then sanding you have a very smooth surface on which to apply your finish.
Another reason I would not use sealer is that it limits your finish to basically a painted surface. If you want a stained , more transparent finish, as many do on old structures to get a more weathered look and also show the grain of the wood much better , sanding sealer will not allow you to get this type finish.. If you do want to seal the wood , you can use most any type of paint and seal the wood very well by painting the back side of the walls.
I have wood structures built board by board with 2 x 4's , 2 x6 walls ,2 x 8 and 2 x 10 floor joists and rafters and then sheeted with scale lumber. Most of them have only a stained finish or a washed down paint finish. I haven't had any warping to speak of on anything in the last 30 years or so.
I don't mean to take issue with anyone , but this is what has worked for me.
Ken
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Ken Day wrote:

In what sort of climate does this work? It would help to know that, then your method may or may not be applicable. Wild swings in humidity and temperature would tend to warp wood, especially thin stuff, I would think. A constant temp and humidity would not.
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On Sat, 28 Jan 2006 05:42:18 GMT, Jay Cunnington

I see many models constructed this way from all over the country at regional and national conventions. I don't simply chose NOT to seal , it's just that I can't get the finishes I want if I apply sealer. It certainly wouldn't hurt to apply sealer , especially on large structures with thin sheet wood. I live in West Virginia in the Ohio Valley and the humidity and temperature varies a lot. I don't really know what it would do in some of the more humid areas around the country , but just saying what works for me.
Ken
Ken
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