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What do you suggest other than a generator then?
Reply to
R D Gravy
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Pumps. I 've always thought that we don't make enough of squirting water up in the air.
Usually, it just runs out of a pipe & into a tank, but there must be better ways to exhibit flowing water without resorting to ducks and waterwheels.
regards,
Kim Siddorn
Reply to
Kim Siddorn
On Wed, 12 Mar 2008 16:43:45 -0000, "Kim Siddorn" finished tucking into their plate of fish, chips and mushy peas. Wiping their mouths, they swiggged the last of their cup of tea, paid the bill and wrote::
I think the most innovative display I saw was an engine, which powered a water pump, which pumped water into a header tank about 6' off the ground, which powered a hydraulic ram, which looks something like the one at:
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. All the water ended up in a "sump" from whence it was pumped around again.
Brian L Dominic
Web Site:
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Newsgroup readers should note that the reply-to address is NOT read: To email me, please send to brian(dot)dominic(at)tiscali(dot)co(dot)uk
Reply to
Brian Dominic
Kim,
I would love to squirt water up in the air but I cant justify the 30ft dia tank to catch it or the umbrella's for my neighbours.
Martin P
Reply to
campingstoveman
Didn't you have a small dynamometer.....
Peter
-- Peter & Rita Forbes Email: snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk
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Reply to
Peter A Forbes
Many moons back I gave Martin a little electric washing machine. It was basically a large pan with a motor and stirer mounted through the lid. The idea was you put your washing in, placed it on the cooker to heat the water and the stirer did the work. It was a wonderful piece of antiquity that would combine Martins interests in stoves and engines (driving a generator). It should be possible to cut a vision panel into the side of the pan to see it working as they do with milk coolers. It conjours up a wonderful vision of the Perman smalls being washed in full view on a rally field. The generator could also power a spin drier and an iron to press the resulting items Surely a unique piece of eminently practical showmanship. On the longer shows, there's even the oportunity to earn a little beer money by taking in laundry. Have you still got it Martin?
John
Reply to
John
Now in my shed... Plan is to use it to provide a load for the big Crossley FOE1 when I eventually get it installed :-)
Cheers
Dan
Reply to
Dan Howden
I have seen a brick crusher in operation which would be good for display although you would need a large quantity of bricks at hand.
Reply to
R D Gravy
BD> I think the most innovative display I saw was an engine, which powered BD> a water pump, which pumped water into a header tank about 6' off the BD> ground, which powered a hydraulic ram, which looks something like the BD> one at:
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com/main/rampumpleaflet.htm . All BD> the water ended up in a "sump" from whence it was pumped around again.
BD> Brian L Dominic
That is exactly the set-up which sprang to my mind when Kim mentioned making more of pumping water. Don't suppose you remember where you saw it because I'm blowed if I can.
nickh=== Posted with Qusnetsoft NewsReader 2.2.0.8
Reply to
nickh
yes
Reply to
campingstoveman
There used to be one working at the Centre for Alternative Technology. They certainly have details of them (at a cost) either paper or for download. If anyone's in the area, it's worth a visit.
John
Reply to
John
Why think small in the 60s there was a hydralic supply in Liverpool which powered lifts and hoists in the wharehouses.
Reply to
vic the barge
My father-in-law had limited mobility and had a chair to move him into and out of the bath. It was lifted hydraulically by mains water pressure. With a few ducks in the bath, you'd have the best of both worlds, apart from the poor wet sod on the seat that is.
John
Reply to
John
On Wed, 12 Mar 2008 22:58:35 +0100, nickh finished tucking into their plate of fish, chips and mushy peas. Wiping their mouths, they swiggged the last of their cup of tea, paid the bill and wrote::
Neither can I!
Brian L Dominic
Web Site:
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Newsgroup readers should note that the reply-to address is NOT read: To email me, please send to brian(dot)dominic(at)tiscali(dot)co(dot)uk
Reply to
Brian Dominic
A decent sized centrifugal pump with the in and out piped together with a gate valve in the pipework and filled with thick oil doesnt half make them work when the valve is nearly shut!!
Reply to
Charles Hamilton
"John" wrote
It was still there when I visited last Summer.
Nick H
Reply to
Nick H
"R D Gravy" wrote
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Great link - I had no idea the system was so extensive, nor that it lasted until 1977!
I remember seeing a small reciprocating 'water motor' apparently intended for organ blowing exhibited at the '1000' engine rally a few years ago and I have a turbine type (£10 on the club sales stand at the same event!) which would make an interesting display driven from an engine powered pump.
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Nick H
Reply to
Nick H
As did Manchester
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Reply to
brightside S9
Aren't all the lock gates a still operated from the same hydraulic system? I don't think the new Cumberland Basin bridge is though.
Inside the orginal victorian pumping station building, not the 1950/60's one adjoining, at the Victoria Reservoir in Clifton is the steam powered beam engine, or was about 20 years ago. The coal yard for the boiler was a carpark then.
Reply to
Dave Liquorice

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