No fuel required

How about building and rallying one of these next season ;-)
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Reply to
Nick H
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Sounds too good to be true
Reply to
The wild eye
Taking a cynical stance, brought about by being with most of you lot :-)), I think this is a quick money earner cos some idiot is going to buy one. Martin P
Reply to
Campingstoveman
Tw> Sounds too good to be true
Surely not!
nickh=== Posted with Qusnetsoft NewsReader 2.2.0.8
Reply to
nickh
Sir Isaac Newton would be very interested to see they working - who knows, he might find a sixth law. You know what they say - if it looks like being too good to be true, likely it is!
That said - he said cautiously, being very aware of his audience - I remember reading about a hub centre steering experiment in the thirties in which the caged ball race wheel bearings repeatedly collapsed with every appearance of spalling from compression in the centre of the track. As the only forces that could be discovered were centrifugal with a thrust moment when the wheel was steered, the reporter was nonplussed by this totally unexpected failure.
With seventy years of science between then and now, anyone got any ideas???
Regards,
Kim Siddorn.
Reply to
Kim Siddorn
As the Yorkshire saying goes :- 'You don't get owt for nowt'.
Andy M
milestones snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com
Reply to
Andy Milestone
Ought for nought
Reply to
Andy H
Hi Andy, the correct Yorkshire is, Hear all, see all, say nowt. Eight all, sup all, pay nowt and if tha ever does owt for nowt allus do it for thi sen!
I am Lancashire not Yorkshire but I have a Yorkshire Wallet. -- Dave Croft Warrington England
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Reply to
Dave Croft
HI Dave, I am an exiled Yorkie but sadly my wallet is open to all via my missus, it should definitely be pronounced "nought" not "nowt" on the eastern side of the Pennines though Cheers, Andy
Reply to
Andy H
This, however, appears to be true! Just another day on the river ......
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Regards,
Kim Siddorn.
Reply to
Kim Siddorn
You've reminded me of a piece in the Manchester Evening News a couple of weeks ago (at
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which stated that 7% of western countries' GDP is spent on replacing ball bearings. Can it really be anywhere near as high as this??
David Mack
Reply to
David Mack
I could maybe see 0.07% of GDP but never 7%, that is a hugely wrong figure in my own view.
I did look at the article and there is mention of £20m saving in a mine, but no specifics and no connection with the 7% of GDP either.
Probably a journalistic error. Peter -- Peter A Forbes Prepair Ltd, Luton, UK snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk
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Reply to
Prepair Ltd
Probably written by a journalist who wouldn't know the significance of a decimal point, except maybe one in his expenses claim
Cheers Tim
Dutton Dry-Dock Traditional & Modern canal craft repairs Vintage diesel engine service
Reply to
Tim Leech
"Kim Siddorn" wrote (snip):-
Not quite sure how this relates to perpetual motion claims but they say every (failed) bearing tells a story (the one we had returned from an onion bhaji factory certainly did - pooh!). Most likely reason for premature failure showing an even wear band right around the middle of the raceway is preload from excessive interference fit on shaft and/or housing. Seems unlikely though if the designer was doing his job properly, more usually seen when a standard bearing has been used as a replacement for a 'loose fit up' C3 or C4 part (e.g. Lister D mains should be C3).
useful site:-
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Reply to
Nick H
"Nick H" wrote (snip):-
Sorry Nick, I should have been clearer. There appeared to be centripetal forces at work on the collapsing bearings, something which could be very useful in the search for perpetual motion.
- and possibly the Phoenix, the Unicorn & the Philosopher's Stone!
Regards,
Kim Siddorn.
Reply to
Kim Siddorn

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