Producer Gas Plants

A large number of gas engines have luckily survived and are with us in all their glory today. Sadly though the same cannot be said for the
producer gas plants that used to acompany many of the engines. I understand that a side effect of the process was that it was very damaging to the plant. I have only ever seen the remains of the plant at the Pitstone farm museum which is installed in the same building as the museums Crossley GE11. It has Campbell Halifax on the casting. Are there others in preservation and more to the point any in servicable condition. This would surely make a very interesting project for one of the large museums (usual discalimers on funds and time apply).
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I shudder to think what carcinogens were being produced in gas producer plants - coal tar being but a minor one, I'd think.
I know that the ground at the old gas works in Cannon's Marsh in the middle of some VERY expensive building land in the centre of the old Bristol docks area is still unrecovered. The soil has soaked up so much stuff over the years that it will need the whole lot to be removed. I understand that planning permissions are constantly turned down because putting in a trench would mean local evacuation and road closures!
Regards,
Kim Siddorn
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On Thu, 5 Feb 2004 15:44:50 -0000, J K Siddorn wrote:

And toxins.

Yep, did some filming in there many moons ago, ISTR that the principle contaminant was (is...) Aresnic but there is also a great long list of heavy metals as well.
I wonder how long it will be before the value of that land (and it's quite a big site) out strips the reclaimation costs?
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Cheers snipped-for-privacy@howhill.com
Dave. pam is missing e-mail
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Macdonald Smith wrote:

I may be wrong here but I think the amberly chalk pits has a set which gets a run occasionally
Maybe someone else here can comment.
Jon
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Correct Jon, there is one at Amberley, but I doubt it is in working condition. The engines in the shed behind it run and their exhausts deliver into the covered, open sided shed containing the gas engine and its producer which might make you think it was working. It is a Tangye I think.
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John Ambler

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On Thu, 5 Feb 2004 17:19:36 +0000 (UTC), Jon hutchings

Do you mean the Tangye, with the hand cranked blower to fire up the gasifier? If it still runs I'd love to see it working.
AJH
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Producer gas technology for biomass (wood chips), has gotten very clean. If the gas is clean, would the stationary engine work well? Would make a great renewable energy generating plant. Bill
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It needs scrubber too :-) There is a wonderful group of Frenchmen who usually demonstrate a producer gas engine at Dorset. It worked well in the early 1900s and under the new technology and materials the technique is much the same. ttfn
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Roland Craven
nr Exeter Devon, UK
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