Figures

A few weeks ago there was a bit of a debate hereabouts about the lack of
suitable figures. Well it caused me to have a bit of a think and as I used
to make wargame figures and accessories I?ve chopped in my plans to go DCC
and I?ve made a modest outlay in respect of casting kit. (Oh and I also
need some castings for my layout and they'd be best made by myself).
May I trouble folks who don?t have anything better to do to assist in a bit
of market research ...
What figures would folks most like to see, period, poses etc
Are white metal or hard resin most preferred
What pack size would be preferred
And what would you be prepared to pay for good quality, unpainted figures
TIA to one and all ...
... and of course a Merry Xmas (spare a thought I shall be working Xmas
day)
Reply to
Chris Wilson
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If it were me, I'd be after modern 4mm scale figures, i.e. contemporary to fashion today, as I reckon that's probably one of the most neglected periods (the Victorian being another), probably due to it changing on a regular basis. An element of the comic in their poses always appeals to me too :-)
I am interested in several different periods of railways (c1962, 1987, current) but my layouts always end up with an aspect of a preservation railway in them, so contemporary figures are the most appropriate.
I'd always prefer to see a figure moulded in whatever material allows the most accurate detail, and I have to say that white metal never quite seems to do the task for me. But I don't really know resin well enough to say if it's better.
Pack sizes are really variable, from the ones and twos for very specific little scenes, to the twenties or thirties for larger populating tasks.
As for cost, I really don't know. I know that Noch figures, painted, in packs of 15 or so are about £18, so for unpainted I'd probably be looking at about £10 for 20, or about 50p a figure, or in smaller packs of 1-5 figures, about £1.00 per figure, but again I just don't know the market well enough to know if that's even a reasonable value, either too high or too low.
HTH, happy christmas and merry new year and all that jazz,
Ian J.
Reply to
Ian J.
A range of drivers and fireman in different poses would be nice. Could be a good bread & butter seller as well. OK how do I say one you can sell a lot of without appearing to suggest a model of sandwhich man ? 4mm of course. Cheers, Simon
Reply to
simon
Uniformed and workmen always seem to go well, not least as they tended to change slowly. But station staff, porters etc would be good, as would engine crews and angine shed men, even a permenant way gang. Another one I can suggest would be a vicar, there always seemed to be one on a station.
Reply to
estarriol
And the drunk Scotsman for the buffet car as installed at build?
Cheers Richard
Reply to
beamendsltd
Chris Wilson said the following on 18/12/2007 22:01:
Definitely not "action" poses, so people sitting, leaning against walls, standing around - that sort of thing. Nothing looks worse than figures frozen in mid-action as a train goes by. For me, the period would be 1930s bog-standard people. There's too much cameo-type stuff about already. I don't ever, ever want to see another wedding/funeral/vicar on a layout :-)
White metal, because to a degree it can be formed so arms and legs can be moved about. Resin is nasty, horrible stuff!
10/25/50/100 options. 100 *different* people would be nice :-)
I look at it the other way around. If I see something I like, I look at the price and have a think about it, with due regard for the overall effect on the layout. Really, all I can suggest you do is to work out a cost you're happy with, and let the punters decide. If you turn out good quality stuff, people will buy it.
Altogether now....aaahhhhh!!
Good luck with your venture.
Reply to
Paul Boyd
S'funny, cause I actually like to see some action poses, in amongst the static ones :-)
Ian J.
Reply to
Ian J.
Everyone always forgets the tea can and bags when doing traincrew!
Cheers Richard
Reply to
beamendsltd
"Ian J." wrote in news:13miau7javaje67 @corp.supernews.com:
Er ... I already have a master for an "Uncle Ernie" with one hand inside his trench coat. ;-)
Reply to
Chris Wilson
Chris Wilson wrote in news:Xns9A0AE0608A89Fulmbritwarcouk@62.253.170.163:
Thanks to everyone for the feedback ... and any more that comes in, all very well recieved. i
Reply to
Chris Wilson
As in this set?
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Reply to
MartinS
MartinS wrote in news:4769d8cc$0$47134$892e7fe2 @authen.yellow.readfreenews.net:
Oh buggar.
Reply to
Chris Wilson
A painted figure with the exact pose you described was featured on BBC's "Car Booty" this morning. Then resident valuer bet £10 nobody would buy it. I didn't watch long enough to find out, was more interested in the first edition Corgi 007 Aston Martin.
(kim)
Reply to
kim
Bloody hilarious. I better get that one!
Reply to
Rob
buggar - is that the posh version.
Cheers, Simon
Reply to
simon
"Modern" - I know fashions change [1], but people who aren't wearing long coats and hats would be a good start (why are modern figures always dressed for winter, but layouts set in summer?). Men in suits, women with shorter-than-ankle-length skirts, that sort of thing. In fact, just including women would be a good start. A large proportion of passengers are female, yet models have one or two token women in the pack. No hats, no umbrellas.
As for poses, relaxed, bored, standing around waiting for a train poses. Passengers frozen in midair -
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- just look silly on a layout. Poses which are too distinctive become too common on layouts, ruining the illusion, a bit like every layout having the same Peco hills and castles backscene.
I've never used a resin figure, so don't know.
Ah. I'm from Yorkshire.
Cheaper but "reasonable" quality would be better than expensive "model in its own right" figures for filling platforms and hacking around to make something different.
[1] well, okay, I don't, but people tell me they do.
Reply to
Arthur Figgis
Arthur Figgis wrote in news:13mq0hhq2idtl08 @corp.supernews.com:
You have my deepest sympathies, coming from Lancashire as I do I know how difficult it's been for your lot since you lost the war. That and not having a decent cricket team ... :-)
Thanks very much for your feedback, "modern" figures will be at the bottom of my list as it's not my era and I want to populate my layout first but your comments are very well received.
Reply to
Chris Wilson
Perhaps if you told everyone what precisely *is* your era Chris, they could make more suitable suggestions? Also scale which I assume would be 1/76th?
(kim)
Reply to
kim
"kim" wrote in news:XdydnQG_g_okVu snipped-for-privacy@giganews.com:
Well yes, 4mm ->' but I was interested in what other folks look for in figures, after all I know what I want.
But, and this is a big "but" a centrifugal casting machine costs around £650 new, add plates at £100 - £150 a throw per single set add in mould rings £40 to £50 and that's a fair investment. (The last time I made figures we generally had 3 - 5 sets of plates in use at any one time)
I can use the old camping gas stove (indeed today I have done just that to make some test casts of figure blanks) but if I'm using a casting machine a melting pot would be a good investment - say £350 for a decent one for small runs, add another £100 if I am to use several plates and set up a short production run.
Then add in the hidden costs such as time taken to make the masters, electrictity, the price of the rubber to make the moulds and all of a sudden that's an awful lot of money.
So the plan is - once I'm happy with the quality and figures are capable of popping of the old production line I'll go back to selling figures. The plan being to recoup my costs.
Hence this little impromptu market research and hence my comment about modern figures being at the bottom of my list. Note *not* off it, the constructive feedback so far has been very helpful.
Reply to
Chris Wilson

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