Still playing with ideas ... 009+00

Anyone hereabouts built a layout/tracks where narrow gauge lines actually cross standard gauge ones? In essence is it possible/practical to build such
trackwork, how difficult is it and does anyone know of any on-line examples?
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All the best,

Chris Wilson
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wrote:

I would have thought it would be the same as building any other trackwork, you'd simply build one part of the crossing at a different gauge. :)
You could try the Tillig range of track. They do RTR dual gauge flexi track as well as dual gauge pointwork. I'm sure they'd have a standard gauge/narrow gauge crossing as well.
Pete
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...
Cheers Pete/Spyke and Phill,
I've googled for Tillig but failed to find a comprehensive listing in English. No matter I doubt that the crossing angles I have in mind won't be available commercially anyway. I'm more in the market for pics and such like of how it's done ... in any event I'm still just at the "toying" stage ... last minute jitters before I'm finally committed to my existing plan. ;-)
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Give this a try...http://www.tillig.com/cgi-bin/tillig.pl?templ=tillig-pl/index.html Then click on the english flag. I see turnouts, but no crossovers. I'm considering some of their three rail track pieces to allow me to build my little mine railway.
Chris Wilson wrote:

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I've not had any experience building such a layout (although I have seen a couple). I think there is, however, a company that produces mixed gauge track and turnouts (designed for HOe/HO, but the same in principal). I only had a brief look at some of the products briefly at an exhibition, and can't remember the name, but I suspect they probably do HO/HOe crossings as well, and no doubt someone here can point you in the right direction.
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Spyke
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Phil: I have tried both 1/ adapting an 00 diamond corssing by cutting it down on 1 axis, and then 2/ by buying off-the shelf crossings available on the continent. No prizes for guessing which worked 8-)
Also Tillig/Tilling (east germany) produce combination track - mixed gauge and entry/exit or with point entry/exit in both HOm and 009 gauges.
My crossings are HOe/oo9 and if the HO/OO track is 'upright = I then the NG crosses with a backslash \ May be Roco?? not sure, maybe an american make
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Phil Spiegelhalter: snipped-for-privacy@fillin.co.uk
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On Tue, 17 May 2005 15:49:54 +0100, "Chris Wilson"

I have built such things in the past, once you can build track you can build anything, this would not be more or less difficult than any other track. Maybe a good place to start would be the pointwork for your storage roads, no need to worry about the cosmetics basic copperclad sleepers and Bullhead rail will do nicely, cost around 3 per turnout and you can fit your awkward space exactly, and after that you will have no fear of track anymore. Keith
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wrote:

such
examples?
Makes sense, any recommendations, late last year I was looking at C&L (for components), looked a bit pricey but worth it for "display" stuff ... anyone else I should be looking at?
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Chris Wilson
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On Tue, 17 May 2005 21:17:48 +0100, "Chris Wilson"

Its the chairs that push the price up for areas that are on show, for hidden storage yards you can ignore all that, enables you to concentrate on learning the basics, filing up frog vee and blades and laying to gauge. For this I would definately use copperclad sleeper strip and bullhead rail and space the sleepers at about twice normal spacing except for the frog area where you need three or four at the normal spacing. Use bullhead rail as its much easier than flatbottom hence best for a beginner and for hidden tracks even if you want modern flat bottom track in visible areas. Rail from C&L 4RA101A 10 metres "BS95R" bullhead rail Code 75 - nickel silver 6.00 The size of turnouts you are looking for will use less than a metre each, so max of 60p for rail. Sleeper strip from Mainly Trains SC1038 (Scaleway) Copperclad Sleeper (18x1ft) Strip 2.20 You would get at least 4 of your hidden sidings points from that so max 55p for sleepers. Then you need some solder, iron track gauge and files, my original 3 was very generous.
For visible points, if you want chaired bullhead you have essentially three choices, 1. The Brook Smith method using ply sleeper strip, rivets to solder the rail to and then cosmetic chairs, this is the original P4 system but works equally with 00, materials I think now only from the Scalefour or EM gauge societies and the cosmetic chairs put the cost up. 2. The C&L plastic components 3. Masokits using copperclad with etched chairs, I havebn't worked out his prices but you can get the catalogue here <http://www.grovenor.dsl.pipex.com/masocat/masocat.zip
If you want flat bottom track you can just use copperclad sleepers and flat bottom rail, no need for chairs although etched baseplates can be had from here <http://www.proto87stores.com/p87stores/frtrck.htm#ULTIM if you want a de-luxe job.
To design the turnouts before building you can use paper and pencil to draw them or for a de-luxe version try <http://www.85a.co.uk/
Keith
Make friends in the hobby. Visit <http://www.grovenor.dsl.pipex.com/ Garratt photos for the big steam lovers.
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wrote:
You're a gent, thanks. I have all the tools, just lacking on the raw materials.
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Chris Wilson
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wrote:

I have a couple of Judith Edge kits about twelve inches away from where I'm typing that have the same effect on me ;)
Pete
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Phil: In these days on On-Board cameras - there is no such place a s a 'hidden siding' 8-) (PS - Cameras are also a very good way of checking trackwork from the locos point of view!
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Phil Spiegelhalter: snipped-for-privacy@fillin.co.uk
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Here's an Example at Porth Penrhyn http://www.trevbowden.dsl.pipex.com/test.htm
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"Trev" <trevbowdenATdsl.pipexDOTnet> wrote in message

No sooner did I post that then I remembered where the one I was looking for was
www.trevbowden.dsl.pipex.com/test2.htm

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On Tue, 17 May 2005 22:10:16 +0100, "Trev" <trevbowdenATdsl.pipexDOTnet> wrote:

Excellent pics!
I have to show my ignorance here. Can anyone explain to me how on the second pic the standard gauge wagons would cross the narrow gauge track? There's clearly no break in the NG track, or frogs etc. The same thing is visible on the narrow gauge turnouts, bottom left, on the first pic. No frogs, just solid running rail.
Did they just use brute force to get the stock across or something?
Pete
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mutley wrote:

<trevbowdenATdsl.pipexDOTnet>
looking for

track?
thing is

No
You can clearly see in the first picture that the point levers connect to two different parts of the points. It looks like part of the frog swivels about it's centre.
MBQ
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If you had scrolled down and read the caption you would have seen that the crossing in question swung out of the way.
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"Trev" <trevbowdenATdsl.pipexDOTnet> wrote in message

Forgot. The narrow gauge turnouts are for double flange wheels so they use stub points her the blades and the leading part of the frog move. The wheels are free to slide in and out on the axels (not on Locos) as the gauge was very variable in side quarry's. depending on which way it was kicked last
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On Wed, 18 May 2005 13:02:06 +0100, "Trev" <trevbowdenATdsl.pipexDOTnet> wrote:

Aha! scrolling down.... new fangled technology... lol!
Yes, now I can see that the NG track is simply sitting on top of the SG track. Thankyou :)
Pete
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"Trev" <trevbowdenATdsl.pipexDOTnet> wrote:

Somewhat like the complex manually-flipped switches on the Mt. Washington Cog Railway, New Hampshire.
http://www.mountwashington.com/cog/tour/ - items 12 and 23.
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Martin S.

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