Bachmann and DCC

anyone know which of the modern image bachmann range are dcc ready?(youknow
the dcc chipjust plugs in so says the bachmann site please someone say 08's
20's and 37's
anythign else thatcould make a scottish tmd home?
Reply to
Rob
Loading thread data ...
24 /25 - yes.
HTH
Reply to
David Skipsey
"Rob" wrote
ready?(youknow
There's a very useful article on fitting a DCC decoder to a Bachmann 08 at:-
formatting link
Steve Jones makes it look like a piece of cake.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
Who wants an 08 that looks like a piece of cake? ;-)
Reply to
MartinS
"MartinS" wrote #
Anne Boleyne thought the populous of England might!
John.
Reply to
John Turner
Blimey... tenuous, John!
Reply to
Jim M
John,
Haven't we got the queen, and the country mixed up? - Marie Antoinette and France :-)
Jim.
Reply to
Jim Guthrie
Same with Marie Antoinette in France.
Reply to
MartinS
In message , John Turner writes
I thought that was Marie Antoinette and the population of France.
Reply to
John Sullivan
anyone know which of the modern image bachmann range are dcc ready?(youknow the dcc chipjust plugs in so says the bachmann site please someone say 08's 20's and 37's
anythign else thatcould make a scottish tmd home?
Rob, It does (or Did) say against each loco on the Bachmann web pages.. I guess you just missed it... The 08 No, but not too difficult to do. 37 and 20 Yes P'N'P.
Andy
Reply to
Andy Sollis- Churnet Valley model Railway Dept.
"Jim Guthrie" wrote
Nah, was that was M.A. with orange jam! They gave her this when she was ill (imported from England) as they said "My lady is ill" which is "Ma melade" in French! and it made her well again... Must be the Vit C :-)
Andy
Reply to
Andy Sollis- Churnet Valley model Railway Dept.
In message , Andy Sollis- Churnet Valley model Railway Dept. writes
And there was I thinking that marmalade derives from the Portuguese word for quince (marmelo), since the first marmalade was made from quince originally.
Reply to
John Sullivan
In message , Andy Sollis- Churnet Valley model Railway Dept. writes
And there was I thinking that marmalade derives from the Portuguese word for quince (marmelo), since the first marmalade was made from quince originally.
Reply to
John Sullivan
In message , Andy Sollis- Churnet Valley model Railway Dept. writes
Andy, what's all this I read in Model Rail about a leaking manifold?
Reply to
John Sullivan
"John Sullivan" wrote Andy, what's all this I read in Model Rail about a leaking manifold?
Reply to
Andy Sollis- Churnet Valley model Railway Dept.
In message , Andy Sollis- Churnet Valley model Railway Dept. writes
Since you ask: What is all this rubbish about "0-16.5"?
As I recall it, terms such as "0-16.5", "009", (together with such miscegenations as "SM32", etc.) were invented by Peco because they were unable to cope with the previous narrow-gauge designations of 00n3 or 00n2½ etc., which usually ran on the same gauge track even though the prototypes ran on different gauge track. It's odd how they can cope with 4mm scale models of Irish prototypes running on 16.5 mm. gauge track instead of 21 mm., and British standard gauge running on 16.5 mm. instead of 19 mm. without different designations.
I was thinking of building a narrow gauge line to go with my standard gauge line in the garden. I was thinking of modelling a 3' 6" gauge line, but running it on track that is 7.5 inches too wide. Nobody should object to this considering my standard gauge track is 7 inches too narrow. Obviously I need a name for the track gauge, and the only thing to call it is 00-16.5. Dual-gauge trackwork might be a bit difficult to construct, but I think I can cope with that.
Incidentally, you don't see overseas magazines referring to narrow-gauge lines as "0-16.5", "H0-9", etc.
Reply to
John Sullivan

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.