This will make you folks laugh

Recently I admitted to being no fan of diesels - I now am hoping to get a
little more edumuckated about them and am hoping some kind soul could
explain the CO CO and BO BO terminology when referring to same.
I can just see some chaps giggling behind their hands at my ignorance! But
no matter - if I dunno sumpin' I akss.
many thanks
Steve
Reply to
mindesign
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CO: 3-axle bogie/truck with all axles powered BO: ditto for 2-axle bogie A-1-A: 3-axle bogie with the 2 outer axles powered 1-CO: bogie with 3 powered axles and an unpowered pony axle
CO-BO: loco with one 3-axle bogie and one 2-axle bogie.
Reply to
MartinS
You could try . . .
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Skip down to Diesel classification, numbering and headcodes
Diesels used in the UK
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HTH
Mike
Reply to
Mike Smith
Just out of interest, are there any wheel arrangement classification standards for non-powered rolling stock, ie carriages and wagons...?
Ian J.
Reply to
Ian J.
MartinS said the following on 07/06/2006 22:09:
Just to expand on that a bit further, the "o" means that each axle is individually powered, so a class 47 with each axle driven by a separate motor is a Co-Co, whereas a Western, with the same number of wheels driven, is a C-C because the axles are linked together within each bogie.
Reply to
Paul Boyd
It's an alphamumeric code for how the wheels are laid out, and it'll work for anything, not just diesels: an example would be a Gresley A4 or Stanier Duchess, either of which would be a 2C1. A Riddles 9F would be a 1E.
Carrying axles get numbers: 1 carrying axle gets a 1, 2 get a 2 and so on. Driving axles get letters. One driving axle is A, two together B. three C. If they have individual drives (electric motors, individual single-action steam engines, hamsters in cages..) they get an o suffix, e.g. Bo If two groups of drivers (each in a single frame, such as a bogie) have a direct coupling between the bogie frames (ie. not through the bodyshell or underframe then there's a "-" between the groups. There's also a "+" linker, but I can't remember off-hand what it represents.
So... A Stirling 8' single would be 2A1 A Midland 4F would be C (like an 08 diesel shunter) An LM&S Beyer-Garrett would be 1C C1 (and a Peak-type diesel 1Do Do1 And the MR Paget locomotive (with steam motors on all axles) would be 1Co1 :)
Reply to
Andrew Robert Breen
Andrew Robert Breen said the following on 08/06/2006 16:40:
A Peak surely is a 1Co-Co1, according to everything I've ever seen.
Reply to
Paul Boyd
Of course it is. It's been a long hot day.
On reflection, "+" denotes a separate driving group in an entirely separate frame, linked through a coupling? So a steam example might be that mobile parade of steam machinery. Harrison's 'Hurricane' on the GW in the early days: 1A1+3, while a more modern and electric example could be the Swedish Dm3s: 1D+D+D1
Reply to
Andrew Robert Breen
And we don't bother with the small "o" on this side of the pond as every single loco has one motor per powered axle, with no linked drives. Thus, it's C-C, B-B, D-D, A1A-A1A.
-- Cheers
Roger T.
Home of the Great Eastern Railway
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Reply to
Roger T.
Most Americans get it wrong - they call any 6-wheeled truck a C. Whether they're A-1-A (the streamlined E-units) a genuine C (the Krauss Maffei diseasel hydraulics) or a Co.
Reply to
Christopher A. Lee
The Krauss Maffei diesel hydraulics had a single drive to each truck, with each axle powered. As do some preserved EMD and Whitcombe switchers with side rods on the trucks.
Reply to
Christopher A. Lee
No, you've got it wrong. North Americans (Canadians, Americans, Mexican, Cubans et al) don't do what you wrote.
-- Cheers
Roger T.
Home of the Great Eastern Railway
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Reply to
Roger T.
As each axle was powered, they become a C-C (?). I can't recall if they were two or three axle trucks.
I don't recall how they were described. My "Diesel Spotters Guide" is not to hand.
Reply to
Roger T.
Thanks for ALLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL the replies
:)))
I am no longer confused, though have to admit that if I was forced to recite all the designations at this time I would probably just throw myself into the 4-6-2
Reply to
mindesign
"mindesign" wrote in news:jpLig.3106$ snipped-for-privacy@nasal.pacific.net.au:
LOL!
Bloody colonials, what's wrong with the good old 4-4-2?
Mind you the 2-6-4 is nice at this time of the year but looking further afield the 4-6-4 may still be a little cold.
Reply to
Chris Wilson
No, you've got it wrong. North Americans (Canadians, Americans, Mexican,
However, as this is UK.rec etc , I suspect most of us don't really care about Americans.
Reply to
Rob Kemp
nothing wrong with a 4-42 at all mate ..... I love them too
They're just not called Pacific's so I am at a loss as to how I could squeeze a joke out of using them in this thread
:))))))
Steve
Reply to
mindesign

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