which would look smaller - oo or ho?

snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:


Some other possibilities for HO stock on EM track - Finland, Russia, Portugal, Spain and parts of the Australian network (where they have std. and 3'6" gauge main lines too).
David Belcher
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On Tue, 16 May 2006 05:28:48 -0400, Christopher A. Lee

And the Glasgow Subway :-)
Jim.
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Now there's a thought: model it in its original, cable-haul condition and use DCC to control the application and release of the Grips..
There's a challenge for someone.
--
Andy Breen ~ Not speaking on behalf of the University of Wales, Aberystwyth

"Who dies with the most toys wins" (Gary Barnes)
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On 16 May 2006 14:34:54 +0100, snipped-for-privacy@aber.ac.uk (Andrew Robert Breen) wrote:

Not much of a challenge - no pointwork and a prototypical crane shunt :-)
Jim.
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And the Bradford tram system; Birmingham used 3ft 6in gauge.
--
Martin S.

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wrote:

Most of the West Midlands used 3ft 6in I think? Coventry certainly did till the tramway was destroyed in 1940. The 3ft 5in tramcars also had distinctive open balconies as demanded by the Home Office and rigid four-wheel chassis.
(kim)
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IIRC Bradford had through trams to Leeds, which would be fun to model, as Bradfod was on the 4' gauge and Leeds on 4'8.5".
"Gauge Narrows" sign, anyone?
Tim
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"Tim Illingworth" wrote

Hmmm? I don't recall through trams between the two, although I do remember travelling on a Bradford trolleybus which overran the overhead at its terminus. I suspect the driver wasn't too well thought of for that incident, although I doubt it was a rare occurrence.
John.
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It was before your time, or mine, John. I rode the trolleys to school in Bradford in the early 1950s.
There was a large turning circle on Thornton Road that had fairy lights strung so that drivers could follow the wires in fog or darkness.
Huddersfield had a trolleybus turntable cantilevered over a cliff. I wouldn't like to overrun that one!
--
Martin S.

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Yes, there was a gauge transition in either Dewsbury or Pudsey. The wheels were unlocked and allowed to slide along the axles, then relocked.
I remember the "Tram Pinch" signs in Leeds.
Blackburn also had 4' gauge.
--
Martin S.

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Hi:
Here's some info from part of a scale and gauge spreadsheet I've been adding to. Hope this is of some use.
SCALE SCALE 1 FOOT = 1 FOOT = GAUGE GAUGE COMMENTS NAME RATIO ? inches ? mm (inches) (mm) OO 1:72 0.167 4.23 British Matchbox size OO 1:76.2 0.157 4.00 0.650 16.50 UK scale. Track gauge is too narrow for the scale 1:76.2 0.157 4.00 USA Matchbox size EM 1:76.2 0.157 4.00 0.709 18.00 UK - An OO varient that has a gauge close to scale, but still not there exactly. P4 1:76.2 0.157 4.00 0.741 18.83 UK - An OO varient that has a gauge exactly to scale. Aka Protofour, 4 mm Finescale, and S4 P4i? 1:76.2 0.157 4.00 0.827 21.00 UK - P4 finescale gauge for 5' 3" Irish track gauge. OO/HO 1:76.2 0.157 4.00 0.650 16.51 OO scale train on HO track. OOm 1:76.2 0.4724 12.00 OO 1 meter gauge OOn3 1:76.2 0.157 4.00 0.472 12.00 OO scale train on 12 mm gauge track (simulated 3 ft / 914 mm track) OO9 1:76.2 0.157 4.00 0.354 9.00 OO scale train on 9 mm gauge track (N track)(roughly simulates 2 ft gauge track) OOe 1:76.2 0.354 9.00 Proto gauge = 650 mm / 25.59 inches OOi 1:76.2 0.256 6.50 Proto gauge = 400 mm / 15.75 inches OO 1:90.26 0.133 3.37 0.625 15.88 Original OO gauge. (specified scale interpolated from 0.625 track) HO 1:87.1 0.138 3.50 0.650 16.51 Sometimes referred to as 5/8" gauge. HOm 1:87.1 0.138 3.50 0.452 11.48 Narrow gauge. European 1 meter between rails. HOn3 1:87.1 0.138 3.50 0.414 10.52 HO scale, narrow gauge. 3 ft between rails. HOn30 1:87.1 0.138 3.50 0.345 8.76 Narrow gauge. 30" between rails? Uses HO scale rooling stock running on N scale track. HOn2 1:87.1 0.138 3.50 0.276 7.01 Narrow gauge. 2 ft between rails. HOe 1:87.1 0.3543 9.00 Proto gauge = 650 mm / 25.59 inches HOi 1:87.1 0.2559 6.50 Proto gauge = 400 mm / 15.75 inches
Wayne New Jersey USA
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wrote:

Isn't describing P4 as AKA S4 slightly more risky than filling a room will religious fundamentalists and saying "hey. it's all just the same god, isn't it....?"...

OO on train on HO scale track is OO, at least in Britain! (does anyone use 19mm gauge in the USA?)

And exactly represents 2'3" (eg Talyllyn Railway).
--
Arthur Figgis Surrey, UK

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It looked much better when I sent it. If anyone wants it as an EXCEL attachment, let me know.
Wayne
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Mike Smith wrote:

Yes, the Glasgow Underground.
--
Regards

Kevin Martin
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Whilst the 5ft.3 inch (1600mm) gauge is correctly called Irish gauge, it is doubtful if that term is used in other parts of the world that use that gauge. Here in Victoria and in South Australia, 1600mm gauge is always called 'broad gauge' and I've never heard anyone, modeller, rail fan or railway man refer to it as 'Irish gauge'. The only other place that I know of to use this gauge is Brazil, and I suspect that there, too, it is called 'broad gauge'. Regards, Bill.

16.5mm
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