Auctioning off Kizer Sheet Metal

For those interested, Kizer Sheet Metal is hitting the auction block in McMinnville, OR on Thursday - January 26

Reply to
Mike H.
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I heard a rumor recently that China has been making a lot of sheet metal ductwork and shipping it to this country in containers, and that this is the reason a lot of sheet metal shops on the West Coast are shutting down, particularly in Southern California. Does anyone know anything definitively on this subject? I'm considering routing my teenager to a union apprenticeship program, and I don't want to pick one in a dying trade.

GWE Washington State

Reply to
Grant Erwin

definitively on

apprenticeship

Trouble is, there isnt much of any skill trade that is not subject to the same fate either now or in the future. At least not without some serious changes coming about.

Reply to
Justin Time

I dunno, I think the skilled trades are in danger of losing the easy work to Slave Labor and big ships but the rerally intricate stuff should be able to be replaced until you are dealing with people too skilled to work for $5 per hour

And at that point it becomes better to have certified and insured companies and tradespeople do it

THe >

Reply to
Brent Philion

My own theory is that any activity that can be exported (ie manufacturing, design etc), that does not involve creative and precise thinking, will not pay well for at least two reasons: 1) export and

2) automation.

So, the only ticket to good life is to become educated or work in non-exportable areas like medicine, law, police, repair etc.

i
Reply to
Ignoramus26433

Thanks. I have some interest.

Reply to
Pat

Major problem is the subversion of the free market. Fuel prices are already 2X to 3X what the pump prices indicate because of subsidies, tax abatements, etc. As long a government can shift the public/overt costs [while taking a small cut for the service] between economic sectors/activity, actual costs means very little.

Uncle George

Reply to
F. George McDuffee

Medical (care is big time) - Nurse... , and Civil Engineering - pipeline roads... surveyor... Martin Martin Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder

Just>

Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn

My friends in the San Francisco Bay Area say the same thing. All the simple ductwork is coming out of China. It is making it very hard to find local shops for custom work.

Plumber, Electrician, Tile/Stone setter, Stucco, Finish Carpenter/Cabinetmaker.

All these trades are well paid, and can't be exported easily.

Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler

Problem here with the Plumber, Electrician, Tile/Stone setter, Stucco, Finish Carpenter/Cabinetmaker is not imported goods but imported workers. One of the local cities here is having a hard time controlling all the illegals, they are flooding some of the trades with cheap labor.

Reply to
wayne mak

The thing is trades Are always changing

IN woodowork you have the Carpenter and the Cabinetmaker (I'll claim that the homebuilders who frame houses using a chainsaw and nailgun fit under the realm of the carpenter, or some rough approximation of it.)

there was once upon a time a joiners, coopers, fullers, and hatters were all respected and legitimate trades Who knows the diff between a joiner and a carpenter now?

There was a time when a millwright was closer to a civil engineer/dambuilder and dealt with line shaft shops where one rotating shaft powered every peice of machinery or when there were 2 dozen types of smiths that were common trades that have basicvally been cut down to a blacksmith a goldsmith and a farrier, and they are rare themselves compared to before.

IN a hybrid the Pattternmaker is an endangered species but he does still exist.

And a lot of the metalworking trades and machinists are changing the same way.

But the trades you mention basically require skilled work or repair onsite and those are changing but safe.

Part is change and part is tak> >

Reply to
Brent Philion

The answer is simple: Government!

Military or Civil, Federal, State, County, Municipal, or "District" - all have their roots with a specific nation/state/county/municipality/district.

These positions once were scorned because of pay/benefit levels vis-a-vis private industry but, for the most part, that has been reversed. Today, those positions offer the *best* benefits and, frequently, more-than-competetive pay.

Think of the number of Governmental Functions that can not be sent offshore: Police, Fire, Vehicle Maintenance, Courts, Communications, Tax/Permit/Fee Collection, Airport Maintenance, and many more. All of these functions

*must* be performed locally.
Reply to
RAM^3

========================================= Elected/apointed (not civil service) government positions. New Jersey judge was just complaining that all the state judges need a pay raise. Same for our congress. No h1b visas for senators or representatives, no off-shoring for the courts. Pension plans are secure and 100% funded also.

Uncle George

Reply to
F. George McDuffee

If I were younger..Id go to school to be a medical x-ray tech.

Gunner

The aim of untold millions is to be free to do exactly as they choose and for someone else to pay when things go wrong.

In the past few decades, a peculiar and distinctive psychology has emerged in England. Gone are the civility, sturdy independence, and admirable stoicism that carried the English through the war years . It has been replaced by a constant whine of excuses, complaints, and special pleading. The collapse of the British character has been as swift and complete as the collapse of British power.

Theodore Dalrymple,

Reply to
Gunner

Before sheet metal, ductwork was made out of wood. Nowadays, sheet metal ductwork is being replaced by the flexible "dryer vent" type stuff; I expect this is a major reason for their demise. I expect 10 years from now, copper plumbing will be pretty rare.

Reply to
Ken Finney

Manufactured homes are here now. The problem with building them overseas is the building inspectors have to be in the factories to pass the work as to code compliance. Tom

Reply to
Tom Wait

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