Best electrode to handle vibration?

Planning to weld a square tube trike chassis.
Is 6013, 6011/6011, 7014, or 7018 the best electrode to withstand bumps
and vibration?
I would like both a qualitative and a quantitative response.
Ductility, toughness, or whatever.
Also, what experience have you on the subject?
BoyntonStu
Reply to
BoyntonStu
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6013
Rob
Fraser Competition Engines Chicago, IL. Long Beach, CA.
Reply to
RDF
6013
Boynt> Planning to weld a square tube trike chassis.
Reply to
RoyJ
I think I'd stick with a 7018 on something like this. A very tough deposit, not particularly hard.. 7018 is a good choice for frames and such that will experience considerable flexing.
John
Reply to
JohnM
I am sure any of the electrodes listed would do just fine. What is more important for vibration is the care you take finishing off your welds. You have to make absolutely sure there is no undercut along the edge of your welds and that all craters are filled. Any notches or sharp edges at joints will cause a stress concentration. That little notch or crater will be the start of a fatigue crack. There is little difference in ductility etc at conventional temperatures. If you were building a trike that was running in the dead of Winter I would go with E 7018 because it has a better impact value at low temperatures. There are Charpy impact values for each rod on the electrode container. Randy
Planning to weld a square tube trike chassis.
Is 6013, 6011/6011, 7014, or 7018 the best electrode to withstand bumps and vibration?
I would like both a qualitative and a quantitative response.
Ductility, toughness, or whatever.
Also, what experience have you on the subject?
BoyntonStu
Reply to
R. Zimmerman
Thanks for the Charpy information.
According to Lincoln's data, they all are pretty close with 7014 the narrow winner.
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With the data in mind, and considering that I live in Florida, I would choose the electrode that I had the most confidence in using.
At this point I lean towards 6013 for light gauge mild steel up to 0.125".
BoyntonStu
Reply to
BoyntonStu

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