Drill doctor

I have never used a "drill doctor". Can anyone advise if these are
functional and worth the money? If so also advise if there a certain models
that are best.
Thanks in advance!!
Reply to
Justin Time
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I have a drill doctor 750. It does two things for me:
1) converts dull, chipped, ruined drill bits into functioning drill bits
2) grinds tungsten electrodes
It does both things adequately.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus5533
I have a 750 in my shop that I got new at a convention for $100. I have never plugged it in.
I DO have about 200 drill bits, a couple of them that are sharp. I need to get it out and try it one of these days.
Steve
Reply to
SteveB
They are very functional, and if you do a lot of drilling, they're definately worth the money. I spent a couple of hours with mine, sharpening just about every drill bit I own, and the results were fantastic.
The lower-end models will only do up to 1/2" bits, and only 118° bits. Higher-end models will do up to 3/4" bits, and give you the ability to do both 118° and 135° bits.
If you only have 118° bits, up to 1/2", look at the 300 or 400 series. If you have a mix of 118° and 135° bits, look at the 500 series. If you want up to 3/4" capacity, with 118°/135° capability, look at the 700 series. A DD 750 professional kit can be had online for just over $100.
Reply to
Tom Lawrence
It's one of those tools that makes you wonder why you didn't get one years ago.
Reply to
Stupendous Man
I have one - paid for it by saving several Silver-Deming drills. One was a 3/4 that was chipped such that grinding by hand would be a bear and risk. It took a while but saved the drill.
I then took the drill to the grindstone and finished the grinding. (relief areas). Preforming is just fine. Saving a drill is just fine. Martin Martin Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH, NRA Life NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder
SteveB wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
I have never used one so I cannot write from that. However, I have about 200 twist drill bits (purchased retail for specific purposes and in bulk at auctions and yard sales) all the way up to 1".
I grind by hand/eye on my bench grinder and can get excellent results. It takes a little practice to learn to do this but it can be done. You don't have to be a machinist to have the skill and I reckon any weekender can get it down.
Here is a website that addresses the issue.
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Here is the result of a google newsgroup search on terms "how sharpen twist drill hand". Read down the page a bit where Enginman1 responds to the question. It's quite good I think.
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Best, David Todtman
Reply to
David Todtman
They work great.
B.H.
Reply to
Brian Hill
There seems to be contingent that maintains that the DD is a POS. After a short while of figuring out how best to use it, I find that mine does a nice job of keeping my drills in good shape. Well worth the money.
Peter
Reply to
Peter Grey
I was 100% frustrated until I watched their video.
i
Reply to
Ignoramus21085
I've always been pretty good at sharpening bits by "eye" but when you use them on a mill or lathe, they need to be perfect, and the difference in accuracy proves the machine to be a good purchase.
Reply to
Stupendous Man
Ahh. Well this is relevant to me since I hanker greatly for a lathe. Thanks for the point.
Ciao, David Todtman
Reply to
David Todtman
I've managed to mangle every masonry bit I've tried to sharpen, but all my twist bits have razor edges on them (oh, and they're all split-point bits now... hardly have to center-punch anymore)
Reply to
Tom Lawrence

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