Ernie and Reynolds 531

Ernie said:
I have welded a frame for a 1967 Ferrari. It was 4130 Chrome/moly tube. I used Hastelloy W, but Inconel 625 would also work.
Keep amperage as low as possible.
The aerospace alloys like Hastelloys, Inconels, Haynes Alloys, and others are Nickle based super alloys. They melt at lower temperatures than steel and bond to damn near anything iron, nickle, or cobalt based.
Hmm, I have O/A and was thinking of brazingit whileit was still on the ca (firmly bolted to attachment points to keep alignment). any thoughts on this?
Also have friend with Mig. But I thought that this would not work.
I suppose I can scratch around and find a stick machine if I have to.
thanks, Tenant
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Brazing will work. A lot of older brittish race car frames were gas brazed with a Nickle bronze filler.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You could try asking quality bike frame manufacturer, Jaguar e type rebuilder or ask Reynolds themselves. 531 is a Manganese Molydenum tubing rather than Chromium Molydenum and was never welded when used for bike frames due to the damage to the grain structure and therefore strength of the cold worked tube. It was brazed or silver soldered with lugged joints. A number of frame makers do make lugless frame and do so using brass filler or silver based filler with high build capability. IIRC Jaguar E type used 531 tubing for the front chassis and it was brazed.
tenant wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.