Filling a hole in a plate with weld material

I have a very nice 5x10x3/4" steel plate, out of which I am making an industrial welding table. The only problem, is that there are two
holes in the table appx 2x2 inches. I would like to fill them with weld material and grind flush, so thatr the holes would "disappear".
My idea was to take a graphite plate and use it as a backing bar, and fill with MIG. The graphite would be something like a 1" plate. Would that work, or would the plate crack from thermal stress?
i
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Ig, that's just crazy. Cut some rough pieces slightly thicker or the same thickness as the plate that reduce the amount of weldment you must do. If the pieces are exactly the same thickness, shim them up a little (just a few thou) from the 'bottom', so they stand proud enough to grind flush.
Don't waste your good graphite block on that. A thick piece of aluminum behind the weld will resist bonding of the weldment.
But DON'T waste all that wire! Frag off a piece of scrap, and fill up the holes, sans just a scant 1/16" of clearance all-around.
Clamp the 'slugs' until they're tacked down on four opposing places. If you cannot clamp them, then LIGHTLY tack one side, beat the piece down flush, then lightly tack the other. Repeat at 90-degrees to the first two. Then tack a bit more heavily before really burning in on a full weld.
Lloyd
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On Thu, 10 Oct 2013 18:42:43 -0500, Ignoramus28701

Thats going to take a LOT of wire to fill. You would be better off cutting a couple plugs, beveling top and bottom well..and welding them in, then grinding them flat. In either case...both will be visible under some definition of "visible".
Gunner
"
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I agree with the other guys about cutting a plug for each hole, and beveling the edges for a v-groove around the perimeter. My main problem with it is you are going to cup your plate with all that weld heat, which would defeat the purpose of a big flat weld table.
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I'd leave them to clamp through or make tools that sit through and register on the flats for orientation.
Consider the holes and uses in quality Anvils.
Martin
On 10/10/2013 6:42 PM, Ignoramus28701 wrote:

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Just to be clear, Ig never said these were "regular" holes. They may need tuning to make them useful holes. "Just a hole" may work, but not always.
Lloyd
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On Monday, October 14, 2013 6:29:49 PM UTC-4, Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

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Ernie has an article on making anvils that describes how to make a Hardie H ole. Might be applicable here.
" Pritchel and Hardie Holes The pritchel hole can be drilled.
To create the hardie hole, take 4 small pieces of 1/4 in. plate steel that together form a small tapering box. The interior of this box will be the ha rdie hole. I make mine with a taper from 1-1/4" square, at the top, to 1" s quare, at the bottom, over a 2" drop. By making the smallest size of the ho le 1" square, you can make hardie tools by simply welding pieces of 1" squa re steel tubing to the bottom of your jigs. Once you have the pieces welded together into a box. Torch cut a hollow in the heel of the anvil that allo ws the hardie hole box to be placed about 1/4" proud of the surface of the anvil. Tack weld it in place. Flip the anvil over and back fill around the box till you have completely fused the box to the anvil. If the bottom of t he hardie hole isn't flush with the bottom of the heel, then a short length of 1-1/2" square steel tubing can be used to extend it. Grind it off flush top and bottom, and everyone will wonder how you cut such a nice square ta pering hole in the anvil. It's up to you if you choose to tell how you did it.
The Hardie Hole in the process of being welded into the anvil from the face side. The box is placed so it protrudes through the anvil face by 1/4". To p View
You can drill 1 or 2 pritchel holes, depending on your preferences. I like to have either one hole 3/8" Dia.. or 2 holes, 5/16" and 1/2" diameter. The se are drilled so there is about 3/8" of steel left to the edges of the hee l. Pritchel holes are used for punching holes, bending small bar stock, and mounting plates. If the holes get filled with hardfacing it is possible to clean out the hardfacing with a cutting torch from the underside.
The Hardie Hole with box installed. Bottom View
Drawing showing construction of the Hardie Hole Box and the hole cut in the anvil. Be certain to cut enough from the underside of the anvil to allow s olid welding of the box throughout the anvil heel. Box
View of the Hardie Hole with most of the filler rod welded around it. Best to do this in a few sessions to allow the machine to cool down. I would est imate that it took at least 3 pounds of rod into the hole gap. Bottom View w/Weld
This view shows the short length of 1-1/2" X 1-1/2" thin wall steel tubing that was used to bring the bottom of the Hardie Hole flush with the bottom of the heel. Bottom View w/Tubing
View showing the tubing welded in and ready for grinding. Bottom View Compl eted
The Hardie and Pritchel Holes finished. Hardie & Pritchel Holes I should ha ve made the Pritchel hole the same way as the Hardie. It is very hard to dr ill through the hard face - almost impossible. "
Again this is part of an article on how to make an anvil by Ernie.
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Yeah...what I said...
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On Mon, 14 Oct 2013 19:47:43 -0700, Ernie Leimkuhler

Why do I detect a slight blush and some toe scratching in the dirt?
--
""Almost all liberal behavioral tropes track the impotent rage of small
children. Thus, for example, there is also the popular tactic of
  Click to see the full signature.
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On Thursday, October 10, 2013 7:42:43 PM UTC-4, Ignoramus28701 wrote:

ustrial welding table. The only problem, is that there are two holes in the table appx 2x2 inches. I would like to fill them with weld material and gr ind flush, so thatr the holes would "disappear". My idea was to take a grap hite plate and use it as a backing bar, and fill with MIG. The graphite wou ld be something like a 1" plate. Would that work, or would the plate crack from thermal stress? i
Kind of sounds like you're talking about a road plate, with a pair of adjac ent holes to allow a hoist to hook onto it...usually "D" shaped, cut with a torch to leave a straight bar between them.
I second the notion of leaving them for clamping. If you wanted to fancy i t up, if anything I'd put in more, but maybe that's just me.
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